Car tax has changed a number of times over the past few years with rates being adjusted for new cars.

Drivers across the country face paying more to tax their vehicle as a result of the changes.

The most significant of which was in April 2017 which introduced some  affecting a lage amount of motorists in Britain.

This included inflated first year rates and saw a new standardised second rate introduced.

The three standardised second-year rates are:

£140 a year for petrol or vehicles

£130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol, and LPG)

£0 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions

In addition to the second year standard rate, there is also a luxury surcharge which is payable for motorists who owns car over £40,000.

The luxury car surcharge adds an additional £310 a year for the next five years.

First year rates increased significantly meaning that only zero-emissions car that cost under £40,000 escape paying any road tax.

In .

drivers that registered a car after April 1st, 2018 face paying up to £500 more to tax their vehicle.

Essentially drivers will pay one band higher car tax if their vehicle does not meet a new emissions standard.

This Real World Driving Emissions 2 standard will not become mandatory until 2020, meaning most to all new cars will not be able to meet it.

Motorists that registered a car before that date will not have to pay the higher fees.

With so many recent changes to car tax motorists may be unsure what rate of tax they will have to pay. 

There is, however, a quick tool that motorists will be able to use that can inform them on how much tax they really have to pay.

Drivers can use the ‘Car fuel data, CO2 and vehicle tax tools’ on the Vehicle Certification Agency website, accessible through the DVLA site.

The ‘Find vehicle tax information on a new or used car’ will allow motorists to be able to figure out how much vehicle excise duty a motorist will have to pay.

By using this tool drivers will be able to specify when the car was registered which in turn informs motorists how much VED they will have to pay.

Details about the car’s engine, fuel type, transmission, and model will then need to be entered before the cost of VED is generated.

Daily Express :: Cars Feed

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