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Car insurance WARNING: You could be invalidate your cover making this fault with your pet

Brits love their pets and often treat like one of the family, but doing so in your vehicle could land you in trouble.

Drivers are required to restrain their pet while in the car to keep them and passengers in the vehicle safe.

Rule 57 of the Highway Code offers some paws for thought, stating: “When in a vehicle make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you, or themselves, if you stop quickly.”

A new survey commissioned by Ford shows that 32 per cent of dog-owning drivers admit to not securing their pets safely in the car.

Of the motorists that did not secure their pet 32 per cent said it was because the animals did not like it and 31 per cent claimed there was no need when undertaking short journeys.

A further 14 per cent said they did not have room in their vehicle for a dog create meaning stowing them safely in the boot was not possible.

Over a quarter of drivers who carry their dog unsecured also admitted that their pet would poke its head out of the window.

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Some owners admitted that on occasion their pet had jumped out of the window which led to injury or death.

Owners and also revealed that due to the distraction their pet had called they had been involved in an accident.

A dog training expert has revealed his guidance for helping keeping your pet safe on the roads.

“If you have a pet, please think of its safety in the same way you would about any other member of the family,” said dog training expert, Graeme Hall.

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“I always carry my dog Lily in the boot in her crate. She can comfortably move around and everyone’s safe. I believe that’s the best solution.”

Insurance claims can be invalidated if your pet is not safely restrained in your car.

Scarily, research suggests that if a car crashes at a speed of 40 km/h (25 mph), an unrestrained dog can develop projection forces that are 40 times its weight.

An alternative to a boot box is a which is inexpensive and attaches to a seatbelt. This solution could work more effectively in a car which has limited room and are also significantly cheaper.

Tips to help keep your pet safe.

  • Do regular short journeys with your pet restrained on in a box to get them used to the routine of being restrained on a journey. This should help keep them calmer and less disruptive when you’re on the road.
  • Bring treats, blankets and maybe even a toy for them so they are comfortable and preoccupied on the roads.
  • You should also make sure you take regular breaks and let your beloved pooch stretch its legs and have a drink of water to rehydrate.

Source
Daily Express :: Cars Feed
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