5 graphs to visualise the 125,000 lives lost to Covid

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The UK is likely to hit a grim milestone tomorrow – 125,000 deaths from COVID-19. At that point, a UK coronavirus death will have happened every 4.2 minutes, on average. That’s equivalent to wiping out a town like Cambridge, or losing 735 planes full of people.
The number of fatalities from COVID-19 is hard to imagine. To gauge what 125,000 deaths truly means, NimbleFins has visualised the numbers.
The number of people lost to COVID-19 is equivalent to the combined capacities of Wembley and King Power Stadium.
covid 1
Wembley Stadium holds 90,000 fans and is the second largest stadium in Europe. Leicester City’s King Power Stadium has a capacity of 32,273. Together these two stadiums cannot even hold 125,000 people.
A train with 125,000 passengers would stretch 25.32 miles, the distance from King’s Cross St Pancras to Luton Airport.
Covid 2
Assuming a Voyager train car has a capacity of 70 passengers, it would take 1,786 trains to hold 125,000 people. Given a carriage length of 22.82 metres, 1,786 trains would stretch a distance of 25.32 miles (or 40.75 km), like one long train reaching from King’s Cross St Pancras to Luton Airport.
If the entire population of Cambridge, Exeter or Gloucester was wiped out, the number of lives lost still wouldn’t match Covid’s death toll.
Covid 3
We’ve lost an entire city worth of people to Covid.
The U.K. has lost more people to COVID-19 than we have dentists. Or flight attendants (pre-coronavirus). Or pre-school teachers.
Covid 4
walking caravan representing the people who have died of COVID-19 would stretch over 155 miles, the distance from Oxford to Manchester Airport.
Covid 5

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