FDA, CDC recommend pausing Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine due to rare blood clotting issue

1 min


100
15 shares, 100 points
FDA, CDC recommend pausing Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine due to rare blood clotting issue

AUSTIN (KXAN) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are calling for the U.S. to pause the use of the one-shot Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine out of “an abundance of caution” due to rare, severe blood clots.

Officials released the statement Tuesday morning saying there have been “extremely rare” blood clotting issues found in people who took the vaccine. The FDA says more than 6.8 million doses of the vaccine have been administered, and six cases of a severe type of blood clot have developed.

READ MORE: See how many people are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in your zip code

“All six cases occurred among women between the ages of 18 and 48, and symptoms occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination,” the FDA said in a statement.

“Treatment of this specific type of blood clot is different from the treatment that might typically be administered,” the FDA added. “Usually an anticoagulant drug called heparin is used to treat blood clots. In this setting, administration of heparin may be dangerous, and alternative treatments need to be given.”

The FDA and CDC are reviewing data and the cases, and will convene a committee a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on Wednesday to start an investigation. Until that process is done, the agencies said the use of Johnson & Johnson vaccines should be paused “due to the unique treatment required with this type of blood clot.”

READ MORE: Austin neighborhoods most at-risk for COVID-19 infections seeing lowest vaccination rates, UT research shows

The agencies will hold a news conference at 9 a.m. on the FDA’s YouTube channel to discuss the pause. We will stream it live in this story and on Facebook.

The FDA says people who have gotten the Johnson & Johnson vaccine who “develop severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath within three weeks after vaccination should contact their health care provider.”

Billy Gates
This article originally appeared on KXAN Austin

Advertisements

Like it? Share with your friends!

100
15 shares, 100 points

What's Your Reaction?

hate hate
0
hate
confused confused
0
confused
fail fail
0
fail
fun fun
0
fun
geeky geeky
0
geeky
love love
0
love
lol lol
0
lol
omg omg
0
omg
win win
0
win

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.