Great British Sewing Bee journey over for East Yorkshire’s Cathryn


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A cloud fell over The Great British Sewing Bee last night as East Yorkshire’s former dinner lady and amateur stitcher Cathryn Tosler-Waudby, described by the BBC One show’s crew as a ray of sunshine, left the sewing room for good.

After being placed sixth out of the nine remaining contestants in the first pattern challenge of international week, to create a traditional French Breton top, and then eighth in the transformation round, Cathryn had all on to impress judges Esme Young and Patrick Grant with her made-to-measure garment.

But the fun-loving competitor’s “From Russia With Love” shift dress failed to make the grade, even though Esme was pleased with the French seams Cathryn had carefully sewn.

Both judges could not overlook the fact that Cathryn had tried to disguise a seam sewn the wrong way out on one of the sleeves with a strip of fabric, or that the overlay of lace fabric obscured the Russian doll fabric of the dress underneath.

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East Yorkshire contestants Andrew Aspland and Cathryn Tosler-Waudby battle it out for the pick of fabrics in the haberdashery
East Yorkshire contestants Andrew Aspland and Cathryn Tosler-Waudby battle it out for the pick of fabrics in the haberdashery

Patrick said: “I am very, very sad to be sending Cathryn home, but I think between some silly mistakes and just a little lack of ambition, sadly, it is her time to leave.”

Cathryn said she totally agreed with the judges, her concluding remarks on the show being: “Sewing is a very solitary hobby, we have all been locked down for so long haven’t we, so it was like being let out and then being able to share and amongst such talented people, it was amazing.”

Earlier in the show, Cathryn had trouble matching the stripes on her Breton top and also accidentally snagged the fabric with the overlocker machine, making holes in the garment, telling show host Joe Lycett she had made “a bit of a boo-boo”.

The transformation challenge, to turn two sarongs into a garment for any age or gender, saw Cathryn initially aim for some trousers, with Joe enquiring if they were for Peter Crouch as they were so long.

But Cathryn reworked her idea into a dress instead, which led the judges to comment that it was still too much like a sarong, during their appraisal.

Earlier in the series, viewers learned that Cathryn enjoyed a bit of grime music and her allotment, when she was not sewing.

Still flying the flag for the East Riding in the show is Hull maths teacher, Andrew Aspland, who has survived for week five, which will be children’s week.

Andrew said he had been looking forward to international week because there would be so much colour.

Cathryn Tosler-Waudby, centre, learns she is to depart The Great British Sewing Bee after week four
Cathryn Tosler-Waudby, centre, learns she is to depart The Great British Sewing Bee after week four

“I’ve never made anything international, really, it will be a bit of an adventure,” he said.

He was pleased with the fabric he chose for the three-hour pattern challenge – “it is screaming French at me” – and came second in the transformation round with only 90 minutes to complete his ambitious collared shirt.

“This is a sprint, but a shirt without a collar isn’t a shirt, is it?” he said. “I hope Patrick doesn’t look at the collar points too closely.”

But Andrew need not have worried because Savile Row’s Patrick thought it was “a terrific, completely radical transformation” that earned Andrew third place.

In the made-to-measure round, with the stitchers inspired by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, Andrew rushed to complete his skirt and top leaving Patrick to judge the overall effect “really untidy”.

Author: [email protected] (Deborah Hall)
This post originally appeared on Hull Live – Celebs & TV


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