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Spain holidays: Tenerife heading for ‘highest alert’ amid calls for harsher restrictions

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Spain holidays: Tenerife heading for ‘highest alert’ amid calls for harsher restrictions

Tenerife has been refused permission to reimpose a night-time curfew to try and stop the spread of coronavirus. The Supreme Court of the Canary Islands says it cannot condone a limit on mobility between 12.30am and 6.00am in a bid to avoid illegal parties and fiestas.

A judge said the measure was “not duly justified” and that there was insufficient evidence to suggest “risky behaviour” was more dangerous if carried out at night rather than in the day.

The court ruled that the Canary Islands government had other means at its disposal to clamp down on parties or any other situations which presented a risk to public health.

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Health officials are concerned about rising cases of coronavirus, particularly in Tenerife, which has been placed on level three alert with various restrictions in place, including time and capacity restrictions in pubs, restaurants, shops and other public places.

Sales of alcoholic drinks after 10.00pm is banned and beaches, parks and squares have to close between 8.00 pm and 6.00am.

READ MORE: Travel testing rules could be axed for fully vaccinated Britons

In its ruling announced today, the Supreme court said: “We do not doubt the suitability of the curfew measure to reduce contagion without affecting economic and labour activity but the end does not justify any means and the adopted agreement is excessive and at the cost of serious damage for the vast majority of the population, including young people, who comply with the regulations in order to avoid these breaches.”

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The court said individuals must take responsibility and exercise self-control in order to safeguard their communities.

Currently, the Canary Islands are on the UK’s amber list, meaning Britons returning from the nation face 10 days of quarantine.

However, the islands are welcoming back Britons as long as they can provide evidence they have been fully vaccinated or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of travel.

In some parts of the Canaries, a negative PCR test is required regardless of whether or not a holidaymaker has been jabbed.

For those who are visiting the region, the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office(FCDO) advised Britons to “refer to your travel operator and the local authorities in your final destination for guidance on domestic entry requirements.”

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Travel to the Canary Islands could be set to open up further to double-jabbed Britons from July 19.

As of July 19, UK holidaymakers who have received both doses of their Covid vaccine will be able to side-step quarantine on their return from an amber list country.

However, they will be subject to restrictions in place in their destination at the time of travel.

“Regional governments retain legal powers to ease or tighten restrictions within their region if deemed necessary to control the spread of the virus,” warns the FCDO.

This includes “partial lockdowns; limiting the capacity and opening hours of retail, hospitality establishments and public events.”

The FCDO adds: “Local and regional restrictions may be introduced at short notice.

“You should consult regional incidence levels, refer to the advice of local authorities in your destination and ensure you are aware of the specific measures in place prior to travel.”

Additional reporting by Rita Sobot.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express

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Spain holidays: Tenerife heading for ‘highest alert’ amid calls for harsher restrictions
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