Fortnite's controversy is discussed by a number of us devs
Impostors mode

Fortnite’s controversy is discussed by a number of us devs Impostors mode

Fortnite's controversy is discussed by a number of us devs
Impostors mode

Some people from indie rock Among Us spoke out about Fortnite’s new Impostors mode.

Yesterday, Fortnite developer Epic announced a new game mode for its all-encompassing battle royale that has an uncanny resemblance to 2018 online multiplayer social deduction game Among Us.

Fortnite Impostors features 10 players, 8 agents and 2 impostors playing their respective roles aboard a submarine. The agents perform routine tasks, and the impostors sabotage facilities to eliminate players. Teleporting players can be done by impostors to hide their tracks or disable assignments.

Agents can also call to have a conversation, just as with Among Us. They can report an agent who has been eliminated or interact with the panel. Imposters and agents can exchange information during discussions via emotes. A brand new quick chat menu allows them to ask contextual questions and make accusations about suspicious candidates.

Agents and imposters vote at the conclusion of every discussion to either remove someone or vote no.

Some of those behind Among Us were disappointed by the news that the new mode was being announced online.

“It would’ve been really, really cool to collab haha,” tweeted Among Us community director Victoria Tran. It was a sad hour rn.

Then: “Like game mechanics fine, those shouldn’t be gatekept, but at the very least even different themes or terminology makes things more interesting?”

Adriel Wallick (Innersloth’s Unity program lead), expressed disappointment through a webcomic.

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“Anyway – just feeling pretty bummed today,” she added.

“Everything was already overwhelming in this world, so it was just another reminder how small we are all.”

Gary Porter, a programmer, also contributed:

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InnerSloth co-founder Marcus Bromander took to Twitter to point out the company did not patent Among Us’ mechanics because “I don’t think that leads to a healthy game industry”.

Is it that difficult to give it your personal spin?

Responding to a Twitter user who pointed out the viability of patenting Mafia, the influential live party game that inspired Among Us, Bromander replied: “If WB can patent a Nemesis System and Square can patent the ATB system we could patent the tasks system for example.”

It’s not surprising that Fortnite’s Impostors Mode is a collaboration with third-party IPs to sell character skins. Tran told PC Gamer Innersloth did not work with Epic on the mode, confirming: “although we would have liked to, and found out about it the same time as everyone else.”

Bromander later said on Twitter: “Worst part is we’ve been actively trying to collab with them.”

Epic’s representative told Eurogamer that Epic has nothing to comment on this matter.

Epic isn’t the only one to have taken inspiration from different genres and incorporated it into Fortnite. Epic introduced battle royale to Fortnite in the first time. PUBG Corporation claimed that Epic copied ideas from PUBG. Epic owned the Unreal Engine, and PUBG was working closely with Epic engineers in order to build battle royale.

Epic was criticised for cherry-picking popular culture, particularly Fortnite’s dance emotes.

Publiated at Wed 18 August 2021, 11:13.20 +0000

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