Home U.K. Coronavirus map LIVE: 'Local lockdowns' could be BANNED after new evidence from...

Coronavirus map LIVE: 'Local lockdowns' could be BANNED after new evidence from scientists

New research from the Independent Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours (SPI-B) has “strongly recommend national government, PHE, the media and others cease using the term “local lockdown” and instead switch to “area of intervention”. The sub-committee of SAGE, the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, cited an investigation by the LSE Anthropology team of the local intervention applied in Leicester – the first area to be placed into a “local lockdown” in June following a spike in coronavirus cases – and how it impacted the locals. SPI-B said: “The language of a “lockdown” is inherently punitive. It is critical to start to reframe the issue by moving away from this punitive language as well as from an overall punitive approach.

{%=o.title%}

]]>

“Areas experiencing the reintroduction of restrictions should not be subject to “blame”.”

The sub-committee added: “The “lockdown,” because of its name and its targeting on Leicester was understood as a “punishment”.

“People felt that they had been “forgotten” but also had become the “Lepers of Leicester” or the “Pariahs of Leicester”.

“They felt “ashamed” and like a “laughing stock” because they were still “in lockdown” after the national day of lessening of restrictions on 4th July.”

- Advertisement -

The term ‘local lockdown’ could be banned as the UK continues to tackle the coronavirus pandemic (Image: GETTY)

The SPI-B also said the investigation into Leicester supported several other problems with the arrangements of local lockdowns, such as unclear messaging from the Government, confusion over lockdown geographical boundaries and exacerbation of divisions in society, particularly among different ethnicities.

LSE Anthropology said: “Overall, Government decision-making that led to the intervention divided opinion on perceived legitimacy.”

Leicester was placed into a local lockdown on June 30 after coronavirus infections surged well above the national average.

Several other hotspots throughout England, including Oldham, Blackburn and Darwen have come dangerously close to suffering the same fate dye to a rise in cases.

FOLLOW EXPRESS.CO.UK FOR LIVE UPDATES:

Leicester was the first area in England to be placed into a local lockdown (Image: GETTY)

- Advertisement -

1pm update: Holidaymakers make it back to the UK with minutes to spare before quarantine deadline

British holidaymakers dashed back from France with minutes to spare before the new quarantine deadline was introduced.

Anyone who arrived from France after 4am on Saturday is now required quarantine for 14 days due to rising coronavirus cases in the country.

This sparked a huge rush for return tickets, which saw some people spending hundreds of pounds to make it back in time.

Matt, a teacher from Manchester, took his car on a Channel Tunnel train which was due to arrive back in the UK at 3.55am.

His family drove for 10 hours to Calais to catch a train and spent a further £66 to stay at a hotel in the early hours before driving on to Manchester.

He told the PA news agency: “We literally got on the last available train… we’d been keeping up-to-date with the chaos at Calais so we were fearing the worst,” the 40-year-old told the PA news agency.

“Luckily, once we got to Calais we sailed through and actually got back at just gone 3am.”

- Advertisement -

12.14pm update: ‘Scotland would be bankrupt!’ Sturgeon savaged as SNP given credit for Boris policies

Nicola Sturgeon has been brutally attacked after being accused of spending Westminster’s money on Scotland and then taking the credit from Boris Johnson’s policies as she desperately attempts to prop up the country’s economy during the coronavirus crisis.

A YouGov poll of 1,142 Scottish adults from August 6-10 found SNP ministers were given positive feedback for protecting millions of jobs in Scotland and the country’s economy – despite some of the measures coming from the Treasury.

In the poll, nearly half of Scots (49 percent) said the Government north of the border had performed well in protecting jobs, while 29 percent said it had done badly.

Half of those quizzed (50 percent) were positive about the work done to protect the Scottish economy during the pandemic, compared to just under a third (31 percent) who had a negative view.

Treasury figures have shown 155,000 people in Scotland have been supported by the furlough scheme, which was designed and implemented by Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

The massive scheme, costing tens of billions of pounds, initially 80 percent of salaries to help employers avoid making workers redundant.

But while Ms Sturgeon’s Government have the powers to change business rates and income tax, key decisions made on VAT, National Insurance and tax allowances are still made by Westminster.

11.14am update: Denmark to make face masks compulsory on public transport

Denmark will make wearing face masks compulsory on public transport from next Saturday (August 22) following a spike in new coronavirus cases, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen has said.

In April, Denmark became the first European country to ease lockdown restrictions as the spread of COVID-19 appeared to have been contained.

But the reproduction rate at which the deadly virus is spreading has surged beyond 1.5 over the past week – the highest reading since early April.

Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP have received credit for policies from the UK Government (Image: GETTY)

10.13am update: China bubonic plague spreads – Beijing orders second lockdown after new horror death

Panic has swept across China’s Inner Mongolia province after a second bubonic plague lockdown was enforced, two days after the first, as whole villages are sealed off.

The plague, which sparked the black death, was reported in Baotou City in Inner Mongolia on Sunday.

It was confirmed on Thursday the person had died from the bubonic plague.

To stop the spread of the virus, health officials ordered the immediate closure of Suji Xincun village where the person lived.

According to a statement from the Municpal Health Commission, the person died from circulatory system failure.

Those in contact with the victim have now been placed into quarantine in order to stop the spread of the virus.

Due to the outbreak in the village, the Damao Banner district – where it is situated – has now been placed onto a level 3 alert plague prevention for the remainder of the year.

It is now the second area in China to have been issued the alert after a case was reported in the city of Bayannur.

9.27am update: Russia starts production of coronavirus vaccine

Russia has started manufacturing its new vaccine for coronavirus as the country continues its fight against the deadly pandemic.

This is according to a report from the Interfax news agency, citing the health ministry.

The vaccine is being developed by the Gamaleya Institute in Moscow and is the first for coronavirus to go into production.

It will be rolled out by the end of this month.

Russia has started production of a vaccine for coronavirus (Image: GETTY)

8.25am update: Lockdown rules change today: What will the lockdown rules be from Saturday?

Lockdown rules are due to be relaxed even further, so what will the new lockdown rules be from today?

A number of lockdown measures were originally due to be eased on August 1.

However, due to a rising number of coronavirus cases in England, these plans were delayed.

The Government has now confirmed many lockdown measures will be eased from Saturday, although there will also be some further restrictions implemented on foreign travel.

8.18am update: Germany reports 1,415 new coronavirus cases

Germany has reported 1,415 new coronavirus over the past 24 hours, with the total increasing to 222,828, the latest data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases has revealed.

A further six people died from COVID-19, with the death toll in the country now standing at 9,231.

8.13am update: New Zealand reports seven new COVID-19 cases after Auckland lockdown extended

New Zealand has reported seven new coronavirus infections over the last 24 hours after a lockdown in Auckland – the country’s biggest city – was extended following the country’s first COVID-19 outbreak in months.

Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield told a media briefing in Wellington six of the seven new cases are linked to a cluster responsible for all the previous community cases.

The lockdown in Auckland, which has a population of 1.7 million, was extended on Friday for nearly two weeks,m after New Zealand reported 12 confirmed cases of coronavirus.

More than 316,000 people have been infected with coronavirus in the UK (Image: EXPRESS)

7.50am update: Brits scramble to get home from France before quarantine restrictions imposed

Tens of thousands of British tourists made a last-ditch bid to return home from France before quarantine restrictions are imposed.

Those who arrived back in the UK after 4am on Saturday will now have to self-isolate for 14 days because of a spike in new coronavirus infections in France.

Plane, train and ferry tickets were snapped up by travellers at hugely inflated prices.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps estimated 160,000 holidaymakers were attempting to return to the UK from France on Friday.

The latest strict quarantine rules also apply to those returning to or visiting the UK from the Netherlands, Monaco, Malta, Turks & Caicos and Aruba.

7.40am update: ‘Local lockdown’ could be banned as term associated with ‘punishment’ and ‘blame’ 

The term “local lockdown” could be banned as the UK continues to tackle the coronavirus crisis because the words suggest “punishment” and “blame”, which left people in Leicester feeling like “lepers” and the “laughing stock of England”.

New research from the Independent Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours (SPI-B) has “strongly recommend national government, PHE, the media and others cease using the term “local lockdown” and instead switch to “area of intervention”.”

The sub-committee of SAGE, the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, cited an investigation by the LSE Anthropology team of the local intervention applied in Leicester – the first area to be placed into a “local lockdown” in June – and how it impacted the locals.

SPI-B said: “The language of a “lockdown” is inherently punitive. It is critical to start to reframe the issue by moving away from this punitive language as well as from an overall punitive approach.

“Areas experiencing the reintroduction of restrictions should not be subject to “blame”.”

“The “lockdown,” because of its name and its targeting on Leicester was understood as a “punishment”.

“People felt that they had been “forgotten” but also had become the “Lepers of Leicester” or the “Pariahs of Leicester”.

“They felt “ashamed” and like a “laughing stock” because they were still “in lockdown” after the national day of lessening of restrictions on 4th July.”

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

- Advertisment -
%d bloggers like this: