Home World Donald Trump defends sharing controversial video of COVID-19 ‘cure’ after Tweet is...

Donald Trump defends sharing controversial video of COVID-19 ‘cure’ after Tweet is deleted

The footage, shared on Monday evening, featured Stella Immanuel, a Houston doctor who has previously also urged people not to wear masks. The video was removed by Twitter as well as other social media sites citing misinformation guidelines.

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Asked about the post on Tuesday, Mr Trump said: “She was very impressive.

“I don’t know which country she comes from, but she said that she’s had tremendous success with hundreds of patients and I thought her voice was an important voice.”

The controversial doctor is seen in the video surrounded by several other people on the steps of the Supreme Court.

In it she promotes the the use of anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine, which Mr Trump has previously come under fire for promoting.

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Donald Trump defends sharing controversial video of COVID-19 ‘cure’ (Image: Getty)

Ms Immanuel said: “Nobody needs to get sick. This virus has a cure.”

But there is currently no known cure for COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus.

In other videos shared to her Fire Power Ministries church’s YouTube page, Ms Immanuel says fasting will cure “family witchcraft”, and that “spirit husbands” and “spirit wives” cause medical conditions like endometriosis and infertility.

After the hydroxychloroquine post was banned, Ms Immanuel tweeted that Facebook’s computers will start crashing until it was put back up.

READ MORE: Lewis Hamilton fires coronavirus warning to British Grand Prix fans

Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a top White House advisor on the Coronavirus Task Force (Image: Getty)

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She tweeted: “You are not bigger that God.

”I promise you. If my page is not back up Facebook will be down in Jesus name.”

Mr Trump defended his stance on the drug, saying he did not know the doctor when he retweeted the post but he still advocates for hydroxychloroquine being used as a COVID-19 treatment.

The President has touted the medicine after taking it for two weeks when he came into contact with someone who tested positive for the virus.

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The vital importance of social distancing (Image: Express)

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Speaking to reporters, he said: “Politically, it doesn’t seem to be too popular.

“You know why? Because I recommend it. When I recommend something they like to say ‘Don’t use it.’”

Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a top White House advisor on the Coronavirus Task Force, has rejected Mr Trump’s claims that the drug can be used against coronavirus.

Speaking on ABC’s Good Morning America on Tuesday, Mr Fauci said: “The overwhelming, prevailing clinical trials that have looked at the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine have indicated that it is not effective in coronavirus disease.”

Donald Trump, in recent interviews, has accused Dr Fauci of being ‘a bit of an alarmist’ (Image: Getty)

Mr Trump, in recent interviews, has accused Dr Fauci of being “a bit of an alarmist” and making “mistakes” in his COVID-19 work.

Asked if he can work while Mr Trump publicly launches such accusations against him, Dr Fauci said: “We’re in the middle of a crisis with regard to an epidemic, a pandemic. This is what I do.

”This is what I’ve been trained for my entire professional life and I’ll continue to do it.”

The Food and Drug Administration has warned against using the medication based on “reports of serious heart rhythm problems and other safety issues, including blood and lymph system disorders, kidney injuries, and liver problems and failure.”

The National Institutes of Health interrupted a clinical trial last month after considering the “drug was very unlikely to be beneficial to hospitalised patients with COVID-19.”

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