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Is it safe to travel to Spain? How to stay safe on your holidays this summer

While the FCO is still advising British nationals against all but essential travel, on July 4 the advice changed to include a list of possible holiday destinations. These travel corridors allow Brits to go on holiday without having to quarantine on either side.

The travel corridor list was published on Gov.uk on July 4 and applied to English citizens.

Spain is one of the countries that English people can go to on holiday now, without needing to self-isolate on return.

The Government in Welsh and Northern Ireland have adopted the list, meaning citizens from these countries may also visit Spain.

Scotland’s list varies, and Scots will not be able to visit Spain freely. If they do, they will need to isolate for two weeks on return.

Technically all Brits are able to travel to and from Spain, but is it safe to do so?

READ MORE- Spain coronavirus: 140,000 residents are ordered back into lockdown

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Is it safe to travel to Spain?: Parts of Spain have gone back into lockdown (Image: Getty)

The reason why First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon did not approve Spain as a member of Scotland’s travel corridor list is due to the virus’ prevalence in Spain.

She said it was a “very difficult decision” to make, but that it was necessary to protect Scotland from a resurgence of the virus.

Sturgeon warned people not to try to “get around” the restrictions by jetting off to Spain via English or Welsh airports since the rules are “here for a reason.”

Scotland has a lower prevalence of COVID-19, which places the country in a different position to the UK as a whole.

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Spain reopened its borders to the EU and Schengen-area countries, including travellers from the UK on June 21.

This is when the State of Emergency, which was declared on March 14, came to an end.

Tourists across the continent have been holidaying in Spain since, boosting the economy and bringing hope.

Tourists are allowed to travel around Spain and move between provinces.

However, this may not be good news for Spain and for Brits hoping to jet off to the country.

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The Spanish Health Ministry confirmed 852 new cases of the virus on Friday– the highest increase since the lockdown ended in June.

Two regions of Spain are back in lockdown: Segria region of Lleida province in Catalonia, and La Marina, north of Lugo in Galicia.

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About 70,000 people are restricted in Galicia and approximately 400,000 in Lleida.

These people are only allowed outdoors to buy food, to go to the bank, or to work if you are a key worker and can’t work from home.

If you decide to travel to an area within Spain that is in lockdown, you are unlikely to be protected with travel insurance.

Is it safe to travel to Spain?

It is not 100 percent safe to travel anywhere at present, with developments on the pandemic remaining uncertain.

When in Spain, you will need to comply with the measures in the country which may be different from place to place.

If a localised outbreak occurs you will need to stay in Spain and self-isolate, which means you may be stranded there until things get better.

The UK Government advises travellers to plan ahead for any delays to your return home and the financial implications or practical arrangements you may need to make.

On entering Spain from the UK, you will be subject to three requirements:
• Provide the Spanish Ministry of Health with mandatory contact information and any history of exposure to COVID-19 48 hours prior to travel
• Temperature check
• Undergo a visual health assessment

At present, people must stay 1.5 metres apart in public, and everyone aged six and over must wear a face mask in public spaces and on public transport.

Bars and restaurants are open with social stanching rules in place and are operating at a reduced capacity, and the same applies for beaches, theatres and cinemas.

However, the rules could change soon in light of new outbreaks.

The Spanish Government is holding an emergency meeting later today to discuss how they will tackle the local outbreaks.

Further measures may be introduced, and according to Spanish media it is not ruling out more drastic measures.

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