Home World Italian village submerged underwater 'to reappear for first time in 26 years'

Italian village submerged underwater 'to reappear for first time in 26 years'

A medieval Italian village submerged in the murky depths of a lake is set to for the first time in 26 years.

The 12th-century site, Fabbriche di Carreggine, in Tuscany, is normally found under the surface of Lake Vagli, which was created after the construction of a dam in 1946.

It only emerges from the lake when it is drained in order for maintenance to be carried out – the last time being in 1994.

Now, Lorenza Giorgi – the daughter of ex-mayor Ilio Domenico Giogi who held the job the last time the lake was drained – claims that it will happen again next year.

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The move could be a boost to tourism in the region after it was hit hard by the coronavirus outbreak and lockdown.

The village lays completely submerged by water
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This is because tourists will be able to visit the site after the water has gone.

It is estimated that upwards of 1million people visited the village the last time the lake was drained, which has only been revealed three times before that, in 1958, 1974 and 1983.

The village has only reappeared four times since it was submerged underwater

Ms Giorgi said in a Facebook post: “I inform you that from certain sources I know that next year, in 2021, Lake Valli will be emptied.

The dam was built decades ago and led to the village being submerged

“The last time it was emptied in 1994 when my dad was mayor. Thanks to his commitment and to many initiatives we managed to welcome more than a million people in one summer.

“I hope that next year, with the past experience of which everyone has a beautiful memory and with help of social networks, we will be able to repeat and overcome the great success.

The village was last drained in 1994
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“I’ll keep you posted when I know exact dates.”

ENEL, the company that owns the dam, has not yet confirmed whether it plans to drain the lake.

Across Italy, numerous archeological sites reopened – including Pompeii, the Roman city buried in volcanic ash.

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