Home Lifestyle Kate Middleton has a ‘key role’ when it comes to rewearing outfits

Kate Middleton has a ‘key role’ when it comes to rewearing outfits

At the start of the pandemic, Kate and William visited health workers in Croydon and The Duchess stunned in an affordable M&S dusty pink suit. 

More recently, Kate recycled the number and wore the pink suit trousers again when visiting parents who have been receiving help from peer support networks during the pandemic. 

The celebrity stylist added: “Considering the impact that Kate Middleton’s fashion choices have across the world and what Kate wears sells out the minute she’s seen wearing it, it’s only a good thing that she’s throwing her support by wearing more eco-friendly and ethical labels such as Faithfull the Brand and Beulah London, proving she has a key role when it comes to being involved in sustainable fashion.”

Rewearing clothes isn’t a novelty for most people and The Duchess has become known for recycling stunning outfits.

- Advertisement -

DON’T MISS:
Queen’s most extravagant brooch cost £50 million [ANALYSIS] 
Kate Middleton’s ‘authoritative’ parenting style [INSIGHT]
Meghan Markle has hourglass body shape while Kate Middleton is a ‘rectangle’ [EXPERT] 

Lalla continued: “Some people might not want to reuse clothing, they might opt to getting the newest styles on the market as fast as possible, snapping them up while they are still at the height of their popularity, and then, sadly, discard them after a few wears, which is why it’s so important for Kate to wear recycled fashion teaching the nation that its better for the environment to reuse clothing than only wearing the piece once and purchasing another piece soon after.

“Recyclable fashion is so important to the plant, as clothes that don’t get recycled end up in landfills that create greenhouse gases so recycling them helps diminish the forces that contribute to climate change. 

“Reusing fabric in old clothes means less resources, both monetary and environmental.”

Royal sources previously revealed that Kate and William are making an effort to be more relatable and rewearing outfits is just one way they are doing so.

The royal bride borrowed her Norman Hartnell wedding dress from her grandmother when she stepped out at her wedding in Windsor in July.

Kate Middleton has been seen in some vintage pieces a handful of times but Lalla explains that this avenue of fashion may be even more powerful. 

Lalla explained: “To see the Duchess of Cambridge wearing vintage clothing sends a very powerful message about sustainability in fashion. One of her most memorable pieces was a beautiful vintage, magenta Oscar de la Renta dress with a ruffled neck and black polka dots which she wore during a visit to Ireland.

“She kept to the retro vibes of the dress by accessorizing with hoop earrings, classic black pumps and a black clutch bag. 

“Some people see vintage as no more than old clothes and don’t see the beauty in the garments, although it is certainly growing as a definable trend.  

“Vintage pieces are one of a kind, making them stand alone garments which are perfect for when Kate attends events. There is something to be said for wearing an item of clothing that nobody else in the world owns, making every garment unique and a treasure. 

“Vintage stores like William Vintage and Rellik both house high-end designer vintage pieces which would suit Kate perfectly. William Vintage stocks the finest vintage clothing in the world in my opinion, whilst Rellik sells fantastic eclectic vintage curated items from the 60s to the present day.”

- Advertisement -

The celebrity stylist explained the Duchess re-wearing clothing or styling vintage pieces may encourage the world to make more conscious decisions.

“I feel the ‘Kate Effect’ would help encourage and guide the public to be more conscious of their fashion choices both with regard to sustainability and uniqueness.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Popular