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Max Verstappen unfazed by Lewis Hamilton’s British GP pace – ‘It doesn’t mean anything’

Championship leader Max Verstappen was left frustrated as he starts from second on the grid for Saturday’s sprint qualifying race, as he battles it out with Lewis Hamilton for pole position for Sunday’s British Grand Prix

Hamilton heads up the grid as he was cheered on by thousands of home fans ahead of the main event at the end of the weekend, as he stunned around Silverstone.

Hamilton was looking to bounce back this weekend, a track he’s won at seven times, as Red Bull have dominated for the past five races.

Verstappen meanwhile was heard complaining on the radio of understeer, as the Dutchman struggle to find any grip in his Red Bull around the Northampton circuit.

Hamilton lit up the timing screens his final run, and was on course to better his time of a 1:26.7706s, but was hampered by a huge slide in the final sector.

Hamilton’s team-mate Valtteri Bottas will line up third on the grid tomorrow, in a 17 lap race that will decide Sunday’s grid for the British Grand Prix, with three Britons in the top ten.

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Yet, clearly frustrated, Verstappen, who had been fastest in the morning practice session, said he wasn’t at surprised by the pace of the Mercedes, who have struggled to hook it up for the past five races.

“No [I am not surprised by Lewis Hamilton’s pace], we need to look at ourselves.

“The car itself was handling quite well but there was a lot of understeer, so I couldn’t really attack too many corners.

“I was waiting for the front to grip up, but It was a weird feeling to drive.

“I don’t think it was set-up or front wing-related, it is what it is, we are still quite close”

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“It’s a bit of a weird feeling, to be honest, you do qualify and you go flat out and actually doesn’t really mean anything in terms of pole position, so we’ll see tomorrow.

“I think we have a strong race car just need to fix a bit the issues we had in qualifying.

“I’ve got confidence we can have a strong race.”

Sprint qualifying gets underway at 4:30pm tomorrow after a second practice session on Saturday morning, with the results deciding the grid for Sunday’s British Grand Prix.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: Sport

Queen ‘anything but frail’ as ‘re-energised’ royal meets Coronation Street stars – video

Queen Elizabeth II, 95, was in Manchester on Thursday where she visited the set of Coronation Street and met some of the soap’s longest-serving actors. Footage from the encounter showed the Queen to be “happy” and “re-energised” despite having had a difficult start to the year with the death of her beloved husband Prince Philip, a body language expert has claimed.

The Royal Family shared footage from the Queen’s visit to the Coronation Street set on Twitter.

The tweet accompanying the video clip read: “Today The Queen is visiting the set of the world’s longest-running soap opera: Coronation Street.

“Last year @itvcorrie celebrated its 60th anniversary.”

During her tour, the Queen met four Coronation Street actors who between them have worked for more than 200 years on the show.

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William “Bill” Roache, who plays Ken Barlow, Barbara Knox who is cast as Rita, Sue Nicholls, who plays Audrey and Helen Worth, who plays Gail, all greeted the Queen with bows and curtsies on set.

Mr Roache told the Queen he had first seen her when she visited Jamaica in 1963 when he was serving as an officer with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

He added: “Thank you so much for coming today.”

Ms Knox told the Queen when she first arrived: “Good morning, Your Majesty, you have brought the sunshine.”

To which Mr Roache joked: “Well, ma’am, you’re the one who has carried on.”

Body language expert and author Judi James analysed the clip of the Queen meeting some of Britain’s best-loved soap stars and shared her insights.

The expert told Express.co.uk: “There are at least four iconic figures in this footage but only one who plays herself for a living.

“Ken, Rita and Audrey line up outside the Rovers and it is so sweet to see Ken engaging HM in conversation while Rita beams and Audrey leans forward, wringing her hands in what looks like a gesture of anticipation tinged with anxiety.”

The Queen looked genuinely delighted to be there, Judi claimed.

She added: “The Queen looks so engaged here and genuinely impressed to be walking the path alongside the famous cobbles.

“All of the much-loved people in this footage have been entertaining and thrilling the country for decades and thankfully all four show no signs of easing off despite their impressive ages.”

Despite having lost her husband Prince Philip earlier this year, the Queen seems to be “re-energised” and “happy”, Judi claimed.

She added: “If anything the Queen has appeared re-energized and even happier recently, showing her fun side that we had always been told she possessed.

“Here she looks anything but frail and truly enthusiastic about meeting some of our TV favourites.”

Author: Frederica Miller
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: Life and Style
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Egypt archaeologist rendered speechless by treasure: ‘Never seen anything like it’

The Ninth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty served during a period of unprecedented prosperity and splendour, where Egypt reached the peak of its international power. His enormous mortuary temple on the west bank of the Nile was the largest religious complex of its kind in its day, but less than 200 years later it stood in ruins. Much of its contents were used by later pharaohs for their own construction projects and so the Colossi of Memnon – two massive stone statues of the pharaoh that stood at the gateway – were the only elements of the complex that remained standing. 

But Egyptologist Professor Joann Fletcher detailed how experts have begun uncovering its secrets during Odyssey’s ‘The Valley Of Kings: The Egyptian Golden Age’.

She said: “We may not have a time machine, but 15 years of work has begun to reveal some of the temple’s former glories.

“Normally these would have been metres up in the air, but to actually engage [with it is amazing], it’s so very tactile, so very intimate to hold hands with the pharaoh.

“This colossus from the temple’s second gateway is flanked by one of the best-preserved statues of Amenhotep III’s principal consort, Queen Tiye, his Great Royal Wife.

“These massive statues were more than just a memorial, each worshipped to guarantee the immortality of the king’s soul.”

The archaeologist was then left speechless after the team pulled a piece of cloth that was hiding one of their most incredible finds. 

Regaining her composure, Prof Fletcher said: “It’s Amenhotep III’s head, three metres tall, carved from the finest white alabaster.

“I don’t know what to say. Over the years I’ve seen many of his portraits, but rarely one as stunning.

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“Whoever controlled Egypt’s religion, controlled Egypt.

“He wore gold from top to toe and he handed it out to his courtiers as gifts, but he also used it as a diplomatic weapon. 

“His clever use of Egyptian gold is recorded on stone scarabs which served as the pharaoh’s news bulletins which he circulated around his empire.

“This tells the story of his new marriage to a Syrian princess and it recounts how, having sent gold to her father, he sent out one of his daughters for the pharaoh to marry.”

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Author: Callum Hoare
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: World Feed

Sonos teams-up with IKEA again, and this one is unlike anything you've seen before

Flatpack furniture maestros IKEA and smart audio brand Sonos might seem like an unlikely friendship, but the two companies have teamed up to create a number of successful products under the SYMFONISK moniker. After the launch of a bookshelf speaker and table lamp with a Sonos speaker built into the base back in 2019, the next addition is here – the SYMFONISK picture frame.

The frame is designed to bring Sonos’ smart speaker technology to parts of your home where you might not want a speaker taking up room. For example, you can have two SYMFONISK picture frames on the wall behind a sofa that pair with a Sonos Arc or Sonos Beam soundbar to bring surround sound to your home cinema set-up. There are a number of different artworks to choose from, with IKEA promising to refresh the picture frame with new pieces of art in the coming months and years.

During the launch event, IKEA said that it “expects customers to personalise the picture frame” but wouldn’t confirm whether there would be a way for customers to add a single photograph from their own collection to the speaker-cum-frame.

IKEA’s new picture frame is designed to be secured to the wall, freestanding on a shelf, or lean against a wall. It ships with small rubber feet to help it stand on its end, with a small cavity around the back to store these feet if you decide to attach it to the wall – helping you to keep your options open. Of course, you’ll need to plug in the SYMFONISK picture frame to power it up.

Ingeniously, if you decide to have two frames beside one another, you can power the second from the first – saving on the number of cables trailing down from the wall.

Like all previous SYMFONISK products, the picture frame can be added and managed within the Sonos app. If you already have Sonos speakers or a soundbar at home, the IKEA products will sit right alongside them. You can add group together Sonos-branded speakers, like the Sonos One, with SYMFONISK-branded ones, like the bookshelf speaker and picture frame.

The Sonos app has a dizzying number of music services available – more than 100 if you’re including radio stations. So, whether you’ve got a subscription with Spotify, Apple Music, Deezer, YouTube Music, or anything else, you’ll be able to bring in your favourite albums, playlists and podcasts to beam wirelessly to all of the speakers around your home.

The SYMFONISK picture frame also includes support for Apple AirPlay 2, which lets you stream with a single tap from a number of apps, including Apple Music and Podcasts. Friends and family on the same Wi-Fi network can add and re-arrange the tracks to collaborate on a playlist in real-time. Since Sonos uses Wi-Fi to stream your music, it has more range than Bluetooth speakers and you won’t have to put up with any interruptions from incoming calls or notifications on the smartphone.

Product Developer at IKEA Stjepan Begic said: “The space-saving picture frame speaker can hang on its own as an eye-catching piece of art, be coordinated with other wall art, placed on a shelf, or even on the floor leaning against a wall. The interchangeable fronts make it easy to choose a style that suits your individual home. As part of the growing IKEA Home smart range, this new speaker contributes to our ambition to enable the many to enjoy a smarter everyday life.”

The Sonos + IKEA SYMFONISK picture frame will be available next month, starting from £179 in the UK. You’ll be able to order online from July 15, 2021. The picture frame speaker ships in both black and white, with extra interchangeable sets setting you back £17 apiece.

It’s clear that the SYMFONISK picture frame looks the part. If you’re unsure about having speakers littered on shelves throughout your home, but still want room-filling sound in every part of your house – the IKEA collaborations provide an interesting solution.

While the SYMFONISK lamp and bookshelf speakers were praising for their surprisingly complete sound when they launched back in 2019, we’ll have to wait to get our hands on the picture frame to let you know whether it sounds as good as the Sonos One SL, which costs around the same. So stay tuned.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Tech Feed

Amazon is giving away £10 to spend on ANYTHING on Prime Day, here's how to get it

Amazon is offering some customers a £10 credit to spend on any item in its upcoming sales event, Amazon Prime Day, later this month. If you’re thinking about splashing the cash during Amazon’s two-day sales, this is a great way to secure a healthy discount. To get your hands on the complimentary tenner from Jeff Bezos’ silk pocket, you’ll need to make an eligible purchase on Amazon between Monday June 7 and Sunday June 20. Amazon will only hand over £10 credit if you buy something from a small business selling on its vast retail site.

It’s a nice helping hand for small businesses that sell their products through Amazon. Thankfully, there’s a really clear “small business” banner that will appear on listings that will unlock the £10 credit, so you won’t be in any doubt whether the item you’re looking at will net you the bonus.

If you don’t have any items in your basket right now, but fancy the discount, Amazon has handpicked some eligible items here. There are multiple lists for popular categories, including homeware, electronics, toys and games, books, handmade items, pet supplies, and more. Amazon also lets you drill-down by region, so you can find a local seller.

Once you’ve made a purchase, Amazon will email you with a link to claim the £10 credit. It will then be ready and waiting on your Amazon account to redeem between June 21 and 22 during the annual Prime Day sales.

For those who don’t know, Amazon Prime Day is like Black Friday… but for Prime members.

The sales event, which started as a single day (hence the name) but has now expanded to a 48-hour shop-a-thon, sees thousands of deals in every department on the online superstore. It’s always a good time to bag a discount on Amazon’s own hardware, including Fire TV, Amazon Echo smart speakers, and its latest tablets and kindles. However, millions of other brands also get in on the action – with price drops to furniture, gardening, clothes, new TVs, video games, and much, much more.

Don’t worry if you’re not yet a Prime member, Amazon is offering a free 30-day trial that will cover you over the two-day sales, so you’ll be able to take advantage even if you’re not sure whether you want to sign-up to become a long-term member.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Tech Feed

GB News' Michelle Dewberry in firm defence of Thatcher: 'I can do anything thanks to her'

Ms Dewberry will be joining the new television channel GB News. The businesswoman and broadcaster will anchor a programme five nights a week connecting with communities across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Born and bred in Hull, Ms Dewberry is a strong advocate of addressing the north-south divide and an outspoken champion of non-metropolitan communities.

Since leaving school at 16, she has founded several start-ups, advised multiple businesses and worked on numerous projects to support the unemployed back to work.

Ms Dewberry stood as a candidate in Hull in two general elections, first as an Independent in 2017 and later for the Brexit Party in 2019 when she secured nearly 18 percent of the vote.

Commenting on joining GB News, she said: “We are aiming to create something different and yes, opinion will feature in that. We will discuss the news, not just report it.”

As anticipation for the channel grows, unearthed reports shed light on Ms Dewberry’s personal opinions.

In 2019, the Apprentice star clashed with author Afua Hirsch on whether Margaret Thatcher should have been honoured with a statue in her hometown.

Ms Hirsch claimed the former Prime Minister helped to “create neoliberalism”, while Ms Dewberry contended that she helped females believe they can “achieve anything”.

During a debate on Sky News’ The Pledge, Guardian columnist Ms Hirsch argued: “She did more harm to equality than any other leader in my lifetime.

“She created the destruction of banking reforms that helped create the credit crisis. She helped create neoliberalism that has made us unequal.

“There are so many of our current problems that began with her.”

Ms Dewberry fired back: “I really do believe I can achieve anything that I want.

“I don’t believe my gender holds me back.

“You might call me deluded but I don’t believe that.”

Ms Hirsch interjected: “I don’t call you deluded.”

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The Apprentice star continued: “I feel like I can do anything and one of those reasons that I have that belief is because of people like Margaret Thatcher.

“The daughter of a greengrocer or whatever he was. She rose up in a significantly male-dominated field to become the very, very top of her industry and field and I respect that.

“She may have made some ridiculous decisions, you know, she did many things that I disagree with.

“But I massively respect the achievement that she made and in this environment where we’re constantly telling little girls ‘you’re going to be discriminated against’.

“We must be showing them areas where they won’t be.”

The heated comments followed a brand new statue of Margaret Thatcher being approved in her hometown of Grantham in Lincolnshire.

The statue is due to be erected later this year, but a date is yet to be fixed.

The council agreed to put it on a 10ft (3m) high plinth to prevent vandalism, making the entire structure more than 20ft (6m) high overall.

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In a report addressed to the committee IN 2019, police said it would not “object” to the statue in the town, but warned of the possible consequences.

The police said: “The divisive nature of Baroness Thatcher due to her political career and policy legacy and the potential for this to result in vandalism has been raised as a concern.

“A threat assessment has been carried out by Lincolnshire Police who consider there is a possibility any public statue of Baroness Thatcher could be a target for politically motivated vandals.”

However, Councillor Matthew Lee, leader of South Kesteven District Council, said Mrs Thatcher deserved the memorial regardless of people’s politics because of her impact on British life.

Mr Lee said: “Margaret Thatcher was an important political figure, both nationally and internationally, and deserves to be recognised in her hometown.

“Whatever your views, the statue will undoubtedly attract more visitors to the town which can only be good news for Grantham’s local economy, bringing benefits and opportunities for residents and local businesses.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: UK Feed

Celebrity Cruises launches new ‘sanctuary at sea’ spa – ‘unlike anything in the world’

Guests will be able to choose between more than 120 destination-inspired treatments.

Celebrity Cruises CEO, Lisa Lutoff-Perlo, said: “Wellness is so fundamental to our philosophy at Celebrity Cruises that we continue to build and grow a truly special onboard experience where it is woven into every aspect of the guest journey from the stateroom to the spa.

“Because we’re doing all of this at sea, which is incredibly therapeutic in itself, it becomes a wonderful wellness journey unlike anything in the world.”

Vice president of hotel operations at Celebrity Cruises, Brian Abel, said: “Now more than ever wellness is top of mind for our guests so designing Celebrity Beyond, we really thought about how we weave in wellness throughout the guest experience.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Ask Us Anything: Why can’t we see more colors?

Is your head constantly spinning with outlandish, mind-burning questions? If you’ve ever wondered what the universe is made of, what would happen if you fell into a black hole, or even why not everyone can touch their toes, then you should be sure to listen and subscribe to Ask Us Anything, a brand new podcast from the editors of Popular Science. Ask Us Anything hits AppleAnchorSpotify, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Tuesday and Thursday. Each episode takes a deep dive into a single query we know you’ll want to stick around for.

A glowing sunset. A field of wildflowers. A rainbow peeking out of the clouds. The world is teeming with colors we see everyday. But humans don’t see every color on the light spectrum. There is a whole world of color that we can’t recognize. 

Why can’t we spot these hues? We see colors thanks to our eyes and brains. Our eyes contain two types of cells called cone cells and rod cells. Rod cells enable us to see in grayscale, which comes in handy at night when hues are more subdued. Cone cells, on the other hand, enable us to see in color. Our two eyeballs contain a total of about six or seven million cone cells. Actually processing and seeing color also requires the use of our brains. When a certain wavelength of light passes through the cornea it hits one of those cone cells. The cells then send a signal through neurons up to the optic nerve which relays a message to the brain and processes that data.

These cone cells only pick up on a select range of colors. It’s likely we can only see this selection and nothing more because honestly, we’ve been able to survive and thrive just fine with just these hues. But it is true that detecting light with shorter wavelengths than we currently can now, for example, would allow us to see more purplish hues. On the other hand, seeing longer wavelengths, like in the infrared spectrum, would enable us to have the ultimate night vision. 

Hear more about the colors we can and can’t see and why on this week’s episode of Ask Us Anything.  

Author: Jess Boddy
This post originally appeared on Science – Popular Science

Oscar predictions: Can anything beat 'Nomadland'?

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Entertainment

Two film writers predict “Nomadland” will take best picture and its maker, Chloe Zhao, will win best director.

LOS ANGELES — Ahead of Sunday’s 93rd Academy Awards, Associated Press Film Writers Jake Coyle and Lindsey Bahr share their predictions for a ceremony that is forging on in the midst of the pandemic.

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BEST PICTURE

COYLE: A contemplative character study made for $ 5 million and populated by non-professional actors, Chloé Zhao’s “Nomadland” is not your typical Oscar heavyweight. And yet it’s overwhelming the favorite, a roundly acclaimed movie from an exciting auteur that has already ruled at the Golden Globes, the BAFTAs and, most crucially, the producers and directors’ guilds. The weirdness of this unending pandemic awards season adds a drop of uncertainty to everything. But as much as I’d like to see “Sound of Metal,”“Promising Young Woman” or “Minari” sneak in for an upset, “Nomadland” is a near-lock, and an eminently worthy winner. But it’s udder madness that Kelly Reichardt’s lyrical “First Cow” never contended here. And how much better would the season have been if Steve McQueen’s explosive “Small Axe” film anthology (which instead will vie at the Emmys) had somehow been in the mix? Old Oscar traditions are eroding, but not quickly enough.

BAHR: You had to bring up “Small Axe,” didn’t you? I would have liked to see “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” go the distance too, but I guess this year there was only room for one contemplative character study made for under $ 5 million — and the one about the rural Pennsylvania teens on a bleak road trip wasn’t it. But it would still be “Nomadland’s” year and that’s only cause for celebration.

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BEST ACTRESS

The Nominees: Carey Mulligan, “Promising Young Woman”; Frances McDormand, “Nomadland”; Viola Davis, “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”; Vanessa Kirby, “Pieces of a Woman”; Andra Day, “The United States vs. Billie Holiday.”

BAHR: The best actress race is perhaps the biggest wild card of the night. Viola Davis won the Screen Actors Guild Award, Andra Day won the Golden Globe and Frances McDormand won the BAFTA. It’s chaos! Day still seems like a long shot and McDormand’s last win still seems fresh enough that it might push voters who would’ve otherwise went for her Fern elsewhere. This year I’m inclined to believe that Davis will walk away with the trophy for her raw portrayal of blues singer Ma Rainey, but I can’t help but think that perhaps Mulligan should win for “Promising Young Woman.” As for who should’ve been a contender, there are so many but two of my favorites include Aubrey Plaza in the criminally underseen “Black Bear” and Han Ye-ri, who gave my favorite performance in “Minari” as the long-suffering, steadfast mother Monica.

COYLE: Chaos indeed! I think this is a toss up between Davis and Mulligan, with the edge going to Davis after her SAG win. Davis has won before, for her titanic performance in “Fences.” But that came (somewhat debatably) as supporting actress. And there is justice in Davis — very possibly the greatest actor alive — taking the top award, especially when you factor in the category’s history. Just once before has a Black woman (Halle Berry in 2002 for “Monster’s Ball”) won best actress. Still, the race would have been all the more interesting if it hadn’t overlooked two of the year’s best performances: Radha Blank (“The Forty-Year-Old Version”) and Carrie Coon (“The Nest”).

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BEST ACTOR

The nominees: Riz Ahmed, “Sound of Metal”; Chadwick Boseman, “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”; Anthony Hopkins, “The Father”; Gary Oldman, “Mank”; Steven Yeun, “Minari.”

COYLE: After some ho-hum years, the best actor category is really strong this time around. I loved all of these performances. Still, this award has — rightly — belonged to Boseman throughout an award season that has doubled as tribute and wake for the late “Ma Rainey” actor. His greatest performance was his last. Some see a chance of Hopkins (who won at the BAFTAs) pulling off an upset for his devastating portrait of a man stricken with dementia. But I don’t. Expect Boseman to become the third actor to win an Oscar posthumously, following Heath Ledger (“The Dark Knight”) and Peter Finch (“Network”). I wouldn’t swap any of these nominees out, but Sacha Baron Cohen’s high-wire guerilla performance in “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” is in a category by itself.

BAHR: Could you imagine if Boseman didn’t win? The grit and commitment in all these performances are worth singing about, though. There were so many others that could have fit in here too, like Delroy Lindo for “Da 5 Bloods,” Mads Mikkelsen for “Another Round” or, while we’re bending categories, even Hugh Jackman for “Bad Education.”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

The Nominees: Maria Bakalova, “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm”; Glenn Close, “Hillbilly Elegy”; Olivia Colman, “The Father”; Amanda Seyfried, “Mank”; Yuh-Jung Youn, “Minari.”

BAHR: In a category where Amanda Seyfried started out seeming like a lock, it certainly seems like the tide has shifted toward Yuh-Jung Youn for her performance as the unconventional grandmother Soonja in “Minari.” It’s a difficult task to be both the comic relief and the heart of a film, but she pulls it off effortlessly which is why she probably will and should win (although Maria Bakalova could sweep in with a possible upset). Both women elevated their respective films and deserve all the attention they’re getting. And Seyfried will absolutely get her Oscar somewhere down the line. I would have also liked to see Talia Ryder advance to this stage for “Never Rarely Sometimes Always.”

COYLE: This has been a shape-shifting race but Youn is definitely in the lead. I’d like to see more love all around for “Minari,” but it’s kind of fitting that Lee Isaac Chung’s film be celebrated through the minari-growing matriarch of the movie. Two other names that I wish were here, both for disarmingly funny, natural performances: Cristin Milioti, MVP of “Palm Springs,” and Dylan Gelula of the indie college romance “S—-house.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

The Nominees: Sacha Baron Cohen, “The Trial of the Chicago 7”; Daniel Kaluuya, “Judas and the Black Messiah”; Leslie Odom Jr., “One Night in Miami”; Paul Raci, “Sound of Metal”; LaKeith Stanfield, “Judas and the Black Messiah.”

COYLE: This seems certain to go to Daniel Kaluuya. For his mighty performance as Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, Kaluuya (a nominee for “Get Out”) has racked up wins at the SAGs, Globes and BAFTAs. A little wrinkle came when Stanfield was unexpectedly nominated here despite being campaigned for as a leading actor — and that could split some of the vote between the two “Judas and the Black Messiah” stars. Stanfield, for me, is the best actor in this bunch. But this is Kaluuya’s year. Stanfield will be back, as will some of the performers who missed out, like Kingsley Ben-Adir, terrific as Malcolm X in “One Night in Miami.”

BAHR: Oh, Kingsley Ben-Adir! If I’m being perfectly honest, I would have been happy if the supporting slate was simply the cast of “One Night in Miami,” plus Kaluuya. I do think Paul Raci has a shot as the Cinderella story of awards season, but it also feels like it’s time to get Kaluuya up on that stage.

DIRECTOR

The Nominees: Chloé Zhao, “Nomadland”; Lee Isaac Chung, “Minari”; David Fincher, “Mank”; Emerald Fennell, “Promising Young Woman”; Thomas Vinterberg, “Another Round.”

BAHR: The directing category is Chloé Zhao’s to lose and I think she both will win and should win for the transcendent “Nomadland,” even if it’s become a forgone conclusion at this point. In an awards season as endless as this one it’s hard not to be skeptical of any film and filmmaker that has thus far swept most awards. But that this tiny movie has had such an ascent is something of a miracle and well deserved. The bonus is that (hopefully) we’ll finally have more than one best director-winner who is a woman. That said, it would have been nice had Miranda July (“Kajillionaire”) been among the contenders as well.

COYLE: I like imaging the Dynes of “Kajillionaire” getting all dressed up and taking multiple bus transfers to the Oscars. But Zhao will win, and it should be a great moment. Not just because she’ll be only the second woman to ever win the award but because she’s an exceptional — and exceptionally humble — filmmaker with a lot of movies ahead of her. More often this award goes to someone who’s been around a while. Pretty soon, we’ll be wondering how it’s possible that David Fincher — maybe the very best Hollywood director of his era — hasn’t ever won.

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DOCUMENTARY

The Nominees: “Collective,” “Crip Camp,” “The Mole Agent,” “My Octopus Teacher,” “Time”

COYLE: With increasing frequency, this is the best Oscar category, and it’s the one with the most snubs. Some of the very best movies of the year — including “Dick Johnson Is Dead” and “The Truffle Hunters” — didn’t make it through the crowded shortlist stage. And still the films that did get nominated are sensational. Probably the only one that I wouldn’t pick — “My Octopus Teacher” — is going to win. Little noticed at its debut last fall, the film’s audience swelled on Netflix, turning it into an out-of-the-blue Academy Awards contender. I would cheer loudest, though, if “Crip Camp” were to win. It would be a triumph for a warm-hearted film, and for the disability community.

BAHR: Even the shortlist itself was brutal, leaving out “The Dissident” and “Acasa, My Home” but the documentary category has long left out some of the medium’s best work (hi “Hoop Dreams”). It is odd that a late-game Netflix sensation like “My Octopus Teacher” somehow became the frontrunner, but I’m trying not to judge what people connect to this year even if I would prefer an urgent piece like “Collective” take the prize.

INTERNATIONAL FEATURE

The Nominees: “Quo Vadis, Aida?”, Bosnia and Herzegovina; “Another Round,” Denmark; “Better Days,” Hong Kong; “Collective,” Romania; “The Man Who Sold His Skin,” Tunisia.

BAHR: This category seems to be a race between Denmark’s “Another Round” and Romania’s “Collective,” both of which were nominated in other prominent categories (director and documentary, respectively). I think this one will veer towards “Another Round” simply because its directing nod gave it a brighter spotlight and a bigger audience and voters have a chance to honor “Collective” in another category. Another film that would have been a worthy contender here is Italy’s “Martin Eden.”

COYLE: “Another Round” is a lock. But “Quo Vadis, Aida?” is really good, too. Jasmila Žbanić dramatizes the lead-up to the 1995 massacre of Bosnian Muslim men and boys by the Bosnian Serb army in Srebrenica. Following a fictional translator (Jasna Đuričić) working for the United Nations, the film devastatingly probes a human rights tragedy.

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The Nominees: “Onward,” “Over the Moon,” “A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon,” “Soul,” “Wolfwalkers.”

COYLE: Pixar, like always, seems to have this in the bag. The studio’s “Soul” is the clear favorite. There’s so much that’s wondrous in Pete Docter’s film that its Oscar victory is hardly something to lament. But you couldn’t find a better underdog than the plucky Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon, which last year released their most enchanting and ambitious film yet. Tomm Moore and Ross Stewart’s “Wolfwalkers,” the culmination of a triptych of Irish folklore, is impossibly stunning. Every hand-drawn frame is a work of art. It’s the Kilkenny-based studio’s fifth Oscar nomination, and it’s time they won one.

BAHR: Disney and Pixar are so hard to beat. Since 2010, they’ve won eight times and the other two were not exactly indie underdogs (“Rango” and “Spider-Verse”). I’m rooting for “Wolfwalkers” but I’m betting on “Soul.”

‘Never seen anything like that,’ market analyst tells Keiser Report about global chip shortage

The semiconductor shortage has been forcing international auto manufacturers to shut production in some countries. The disruption is expected to last for several months, experts say.

Max Keiser interviews Wolf Richter of wolfstreet.com, who has worked for a decade as general manager and COO of a large Ford dealership and its subsidiaries, about the ongoing chip turmoil.

“The semiconductor shortage is a real problem,” says Wolf, adding, “one of the drivers behind it is that we have the sudden boom in durable goods sales in the United States and other countries too.”

He explains that there’s been a historic spike in durable goods and manufacturers just weren’t ready for it. “This goes up the supply chain, there’s all kinds of problems in shipping now.”

“It’s pretty crazy, I’ve never seen anything like that,” Wolf says, pointing out that the semiconductor shortage has hit the car industry particularly hard.

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