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Taito Milestones Is A Collection Of Arcade Archives Titles Heading To Switch

Taito Milestones.JPG© TAITO CORPORATION

The Arcade Archives series has been a huge part of the retro scene on Nintendo Switch, with an impressive range of titles. Taito has had its share of releases, and is now planning to launch Taito Milestones as a collection of some 1980s classics.

Due in February 2022 in Japan, it was initially revealed in Famitsu (thanks, Gematsu), so we certainly hope to see a localised version announced in the future. Made in collaboration with Arcade Archive port masters HAMSTER, it includes the following eight games – only Chack’n Pop is yet to have an eShop release.

  • The Ninja Warriors
  • Halley’s Comet
  • The Fairyland Story
  • Chack’n Pop
  • Elevator Action
  • Alpine Ski
  • Wild Western
  • Front Line

The design of the official website and the Famitsu article highlight the tease that more titles may come in the future; it’s unclear at this stage but it seems possible that it could follow a similar approach to Capcom Arcade Stadium.

Let us know if you’re keen to see this get a release outside of Japan!

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Elvis Graceland archives tour: The King's bling and Lisa Marie's fantastic reaction to it

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Entertainment Feed

The instantly recognisable TCB ring contains 16 carats of diamonds with an 11 1/2 carat solitaire diamond in the centre. TCB stood for Elvis’ motto ‘Taking Care of Business.’

Angie also told us: “His pinky ring size was between an 8 and a 9, his ring finger was around a 10. He wasn’t in to thumb rings.” 

Elvis had always loved to give expensive jewellery as gifts, but in his later years, he started wearing more and more himself.

Angie said: “Elvis never left Graceland not dressed. He was always ready to be seen and that meant to be fully dressed with his accessories, rings, jewellery, necklaces.

“Lisa always said you could hear him coming down the stairs before you saw him. And it wasn’t him walking heavily it was the clangs of the necklaces and stuff.

“When he left the upstairs he was ready to be seen and always fully decked out. He knew as soon as he went out the gate that he was on stage.”

WATCH A PREVIOUS FEATURE ABOUT THE ARCHIVES BELOW

The Overwatch Archives Event Returns with New Rewards and Challenges

Experience the past while fighting for the future during the annual Overwatch Archives event on Xbox One and Xbox Series X|S. Take on story-driven co-op missions from pivotal moments in the past, test your mettle against new deadly new Challenge Mission modifiers, and earn historically-inspired loot from April 6 to April 27.

Overwatch

New ways to play and earn

With the launch of the Overwatch Archives event, you’ll also find a new way to earn weekly rewards. Instead of the “Win 9 Games” system from previous events, you’ll now earn stars as you play games, winning not required. Choosing harder modes and playing the week’s featured mission will grant additional stars. Each new week will also come with new rewards like the Corredor Lúcio (Epic), Subaquatic Zenyatta (Epic), and Camouflage Mercy (Epic) skins.

Overwatch

Up for a challenge?

Set your feet down in familiar territory with some dangerous new twists. Take on brand new Challenge Mission modifiers like invulnerable barriers, bullets that heal whoever you’re not hitting, and enemies that just straight-up deal damage to everything around them. (You’ll need some fancy feet for that last one.)

Overwatch

Level up your collection

Earn an Archives Loot Box the first time you complete each Archives Mission for a chance to unlock loot like the new Legendary outfits of war for Zarya, Genji, Windowmaker, Soldier: 76, and Tracer. Archives Loot Boxes are also available for purchase for the event duration–pick up 50 and get 10 free!

The Archives are now open–we’ll see you heroes in the alleys of King’s Row, the halls of Rialto, and the streets of Havana!

Overwatch® Legendary Edition
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Overwatch® Legendary Edition

Blizzard Entertainment Inc.

☆☆☆☆☆ 425
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$ 59.99 $ 19.79
Online multiplayer only. Requires Xbox Live Gold, sold separately. Join the fight for the future in the Game Awards’ winner of “Best Ongoing Game.” Take your place in the world of Overwatch and choose your hero from a diverse cast of soldiers, scientists, adventurers, and oddities. Bend time, defy physics, and unleash a dizzying array of extraordinary powers and weapons. Engage your enemies in iconic locations from around the globe in the ultimate team-based shooter. This download includes: • The full game • 5 Legendary Hero Skins • 5 Epic Hero Skins • 5 Origin Hero Skins • And more!

Dylan Bates, Editor, Overwatch

Overwatch Archives 2021: When is the Archives event start time in Overwatch?

Blizzard has confirmed that the major Overwatch event for 2021 will be kicking off this week across PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and PC.

Overwatch Archives 2021 is promising new skins and fresh cosmetics to unlock via the returning event loot boxes.

And the development team have been busy teasing the latest designs, with the Mousquetaire Widowmaker the latest to be showcased.

Mousquetaire Widowmaker has an 18th Century vibe, complete with a plumed helmet and matchlock rifle.

Other designs are expected to be teased ahead of the big release date, with gamers getting the new update this week.

WHEN IS OVERWATCH ARCHIVES EVENT STARTING?

Blizzard has confirmed that the returning Overwatch Archive event has a release date scheduled for Tuesday, April 6.

This will be a unified launch, meaning that gamers across all platforms will get access simultaneously.

The one thing to note is that Blizzard never provides an exact hour for when its next patch will arrive.

However, based on previous events, we would expect the Overwatch Archives event release time to be set for around 7pm BST.

For those who never logged in for this particular event, Overwatch Archives gives players the chance to relive important locations and stories from the series’s history.

“Experience story-driven co-op missions from pivotal moments in Overwatch history,” reads the official description.

“While the event is active, earn Archives Loot Boxes containing skins, highlight intros, emotes, and sprays inspired by moments from Overwatch’s past.”

If it’s anything like last year, the Archives missions will contain various modifiers and challenges.

Not only do they make the missions a bit more challenging, but it gives fans the chance to earn some exclusive rewards.

And the official description from last year’s event can be found listed below, complete with previous mission details:

OVERWATCH ARCHIVES

Experience story-driven co-op missions from pivotal moments in Overwatch history. While the event is active, earn Archives Loot Boxes containing skins, highlight intros, emotes, and sprays inspired by moments from Overwatch’s past. And, new this year, demonstrate your tactical finesse with weekly Challenge Missions.

EPIC STORY MISSIONS

Assemble your strike team and relive missions from Overwatch’s past.

CHALLENGE MISSIONS

Archives missions are back—and deadlier than before. Each week brings new modifiers to old missions, adding an increased level of difficulty to your favourite co-op experiences.

UNLOCK SKINS & MORE

Earn Archives Loot Boxes containing skins, sprays, and more inspired by moments from Overwatch’s past, and complete weekly challenges to earn rewards.

RELIVE TRACER’S FIRST MISSION

Journey seven years into the past and join an Overwatch strike team fighting through the streets of King’s Row to quell an uprising led by Null Sector, a rogue group of omnics. There are no reinforcements. Failure is not an option. The future depends on you.

Play as one of four Overwatch agents in Story Mode, bring a hero of your choice into the fray with All Heroes Mode, or endure the deadly modifications introduced by Challenge Missions

Review: Arcade Archives Haunted Castle – The Worst Castlevania? Quite Possibly

Arcade Archives Haunted Castle Review - Screenshot 1 of 5
Captured on Nintendo Switch (Handheld/Undocked)

Back in the early ’90s, Castlevania was mostly known for being a console series, with three entries on the NES, three on the Game Boy, and four total across the 16-bit platforms (assuming, of course, you consider the PC Engine to be a true 16-bit system). But early in the series’ life, Konami released an arcade game, known as Haunted Castle, which wasn’t a port of any other outing but rather an original title. It was a flop and didn’t see much distribution, being sort of a “lost” Castlevania until the advent of emulation in the late 1990s. But Konami has been keen to keep it in circulation recently, including it as both part of the Arcade Classics Anniversary Collection in 2019, and as a separate release in part of Hamster’s Arcade Archives series.

The story in most of the other Castlevania games typically revolved around Simon Belmont (and friends, if applicable) hunting down and beating up Count Dracula, because it was the good and proper thing for vampire killers to do. In Haunted Castle, Simon gets a bit of extra motivation with his wife being kidnapped by the nefarious vampire literally seconds after walking out of the wedding chapel. The goofy manner in which the classic Wedding March song turns sour as the clouds go ominous and Simon’s lady friend is swiped away, leaving him inhis iwhite tuxedo looking mildly irritated, helps set the off-kilter tone of this incredibly frustrating entry.
Arcade Archives Haunted Castle Review - Screenshot 2 of 5
Captured on Nintendo Switch (Docked)

The basics of a Castlevania game are in place – you adventure through six stages across the land, eventually ending up in Dracula’s castle, whipping skeletons, zombies, bats, and other assorted creatures, most inspired by classic Hollywood horror films. But a lot of it just feels wrong. Take for example, Simon’s design. As a muscular, leather-clad barbarian-type, he actually looks reasonably close to how he’s presented on the cover of the original NES game (and the title screen of this one), but it looks awfully strange compared to any of his console counterparts, especially his awkward walking animation. Movement is slow and attacking feels flimsy. This has rippling effects through the rest of the adventure, particularly since Simon’s sprite is so large, making it exceedingly difficult to kill the tiny bat enemies that remain a constant nuisance throughout the whole game.

Unlike most of the other Castlevania games, there aren’t any candles to whip, so weapon upgrades, subweapons, and hearts are dropped by specific enemies. But main weapon upgrade drops are uncommon, and if you miss any of them, you’ll be stuck with the default whip for quite a while. Still, it’s not like any of the weapons are particularly strong, because most enemies take multiple hits to kill. Castlevania fans will probably be familiar with the jumping hunchback enemies, and they make an appearance here, but they also take at least two whacks to dispose of and it’s nearly impossible to clear them out without taking damage, especially since they often attack three at a time. You’ll find your energy draining very quickly in Haunted Castle.
Arcade Archives Haunted Castle Review - Screenshot 3 of 5
Captured on Nintendo Switch (Docked)

There’s sort of a cheat around this; while you only have a single life, you can insert multiple credits to extend your life bar a few times, plus there are checkpoints partway through each stage for when you perish. The original arcade game limited the number of times you could continue, though this version lets you continue as many times as you want. You shouldn’t feel bad for cheesing it, because there aren’t any actual health restoratives, and it’s really the only feasible way to see this one through to the end.

Ex-Konami staffer Masaaki Kukino has revealed recently that the title was completed in just six months and there wasn’t time to balance it properly, and it shows. Arcade games are often designed to suck in coins but Haunted Castle is especially egregious in the way it hurls hazard after hazard at the player, giving them very little chance to respond. Even if you memorise enemy and trap placement, the awkward controls often conspire to kill you. Simply put, it’s not much fun on a pure gameplay level.

And despite how frustratingly designed and poorly balanced it is, Haunted Castle is actually worth at least one playthrough for Castlevania fans. Visually, it’s inconsistent, as noted with the awkward Simon sprite and some other strange-looking enemies, but the background design is generally well done. It predates all of the 16-bit console entries, and has a very different look and feel. And some of the level designs are pretty cool, at least in concept.
Arcade Archives Haunted Castle Review - Screenshot 4 of 5
Captured on Nintendo Switch (Handheld/Undocked)

The first stage begins at dusk and quickly transitions to night. It begins to rain, as a wall comes to life and flings itself at you brick by brick. Then a torch is knocked over and sets the ground ablaze, forcing you to leap over its flames, before entering a mausoleum and fighting against Medusa. The second stage starts in a foggy forest before walking down to a subterranean canal, where the river water is presented with an odd colour cycling effect. After reaching the other side, you emerge to a mountainside under a blood red sky. The next stage, the typical castle entrance hallway area, has a bizarre section where you’re warped away to what appears to be Grecian ruins where you fight off harpies, only to be warped right back when they’ve been killed.

These are the highlights of the game, and the rest of the stages are a little blander. But it’s still cool to see since it has many classic Castlevania tropes but before they were fully formed – after all, this is technically the fourth release in the series, published in 1988 after the MSX2 game and the first two NES games. For example, while the whip has been tied to the series’ identity for a long time, in this game, Simon can actually wield a sword. It doesn’t function any differently, but it sure is a novelty.

There are subweapons like firebombs and a boomerang that doesn’t actually return when you throw it, but also a cross that fires out a series of extremely powerful beams. Some of the ideas that were used in later Castlevania games pop up here – like a gigantic rock monster, haunted dining tables, and a knight made out shattered stained glass window shards. The soundtrack, too, is fantastic. It was composed by Kenichi Matsubara, who also worked on Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest and other classic NES Konami games, and even includes the series’ trademark “Bloody Tears” tune. The synth quality is stellar for a late 1980s arcade game and nearly every track is fantastic, plus some of them have popped up in later games.

Arcade Archives Haunted Castle Review - Screenshot 5 of 5
Captured on Nintendo Switch (Docked)

But what sets this standalone Arcade Archives release apart from the Arcade Classics Anniversary Collection? Well, not much. Both versions were ported by Hamster, so the emulation is basically identical. Both versions let you tweak the difficulty settings a bit, too. That release contained the American and Japanese versions – the American version is significantly harder, with enemies inflicting much more damage. The Arcade Archives release includes those two as well as the European version, which is almost the same as the Japanese version but with an English title screen. The Arcade Archives version also has more display modes, allowing you to customize the scanlines and such, and tweak things like enabling or disabling continues.

There is also the usual Hi Score and Caravan modes found in other Arcade Archives releases, allowing you to post your score online. Due to these options, it’s very slightly better than its Anniversary Collection counterpart… but that version includes previously unseen supplemental artwork, plus seven whole other games, making this one a far weaker value overall.

Overwatch Archives event release date revealed: Start time, NEW skins, story missions

Overwatch developer Blizzard has announced plans to bring back the Archives event for 2021.

According to a Blizzard social media post, the next Overwatch Archives event has an April 6 release date on PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and PC.

There’s no official launch time, but Overwatch events typically kick off at 6pm BST in the UK.

As with pretty much all Overwatch events, Archives runs for three full weeks, ending on April 27.

New skins will likely be revealed in the run up to launch, so keep checking back for Overwatch updates.

Speaking of Overwatch updates, the next major event will almost certainly launch alongside a big patch.

The Overwatch Archives event gives players the chance to relive important events from the history of the series.

“Experience story-driven co-op missions from pivotal moments in Overwatch history,” reads the official description.

A quick preview of the event can be seen in the Archives announcement trailer below.

“While the event is active, earn Archives Loot Boxes containing skins, highlight intros, emotes, and sprays inspired by moments from Overwatch’s past.”

If it’s anything like last year, the Archives missions will contain various modifiers and challenges.

Not only do they make the missions a bit more challenging, but it gives fans the chance to earn some exclusive rewards.

Speaking of rewards, the best part about any new Overwatch event is the ability to unlock special skins and items by earning loot boxes.

The Overwatch Archives event first launched with a special mission involving fan-favourite character Tracer.

“Journey seven years into the past and join an Overwatch strike team fighting through the streets of King’s Row to quell an uprising led by Null Sector, a rogue group of omnics,” reads the official description.

“There are no reinforcements. Failure is not an option. The future depends on you.

“Play as one of four Overwatch agents in Story Mode, bring a hero of your choice into the fray with All Heroes Mode, or endure the deadly modifications introduced by Challenge Missions.”

Tracer’s first mission was followed by a Blackwatch challenge, as well as a pursuit mission on the streets of Havana.