Tag Archives: colour

Ear wax: Can the colour indicate a problem with your health? When to see medical help

How can you prevent earwax build-up?

The best thing to do is to avoid putting anything in your ears that could push earwax further into your ear canal and lead to impacted wax, infection or even a perforated ear drum, said Harrison.

He continued: “It is extremely important not to put things such as cotton buds, ear candles, match sticks, hair grips and pencils (yes really) in your ears to rid them of any build up.  

“It’s also important to keep your ears clean. You should regularly wipe around the outside of your ear, particularly after showering or washing your face.”

So what should you do if your ears become blocked?

Earwax does usually fall out on its own. If it doesn’t and causes a persistent blockage, it’s best to seek professional advice. 

Author: Katrina Turrill
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: Life and Style
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Stacey Dooley flaunts Clairol hair colour after Glow Up 'axe over ad breaching BBC rules'

Stacey Dooley, 34, has appeared to issue a defiant post supporting her collaboration with hair care brand Clairol. The Strictly Come Dancing winner took to Instagram to promote the hair dye kit she created with the beauty brand just minutes after reports emerged that she was “secretly dropped” from hosting Glow Up as her advert breached BBC rules.

Stacey shared a video showing off her signature red locks in view of her 980,000 followers this evening, crediting Clairol for her new look.

The star, who is dating former Strictly pro Kevin Clifton, filmed herself running her fingers through her hair while smiling for the camera at home.

She penned alongside the video: “Box freshhhhhhhhhh.

“My @clairol_uk_ire colour. (YES, I really do use it!)

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“(Obvs have a working relationship w/Clairol but no obligation to post this)

“And trim by the ACE @eamonnhughes.”

Stacey created the post just moments after The Sun claimed that BBC bosses said Clairol commercials starring the documentary filmmaker showed a clear disregard for its strict impartiality rules.

The adverts, which featured Stacey wearing leotard while flaunting her freshly dyed hair, reportedly prompted her to be axed from her hosting role on BBC Three’s Glow Up before being replaced by Maya Jama this year.

“It was a tricky situation as she does other things for the BBC, but they decided she would lose her Glow Up contract.

“It’s a hair care brand, it’s glossy and glam. Glow Up is all about beauty.

“So, basically, the BBC said, ‘You’re sacked from Glow Up, but you can keep making documentaries that air on the BBC’.”

Express.co.uk has contacted the BBC and Stacey Dooley’s representative for comment. 

Stacey fronted Glow Up for seasons one and two.

She then told fans in October 2020 she would not be presenting the third series due to scheduling conflicts.

Stacey congratulated her replacement, Maya, when she was announced as the new host by posting a sweet picture of the pair.

“Well done superstar…!

“Keep shining @mayajama,” the star wrote alongside the snap.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Celebrity News Feed

Statins side effects: The colour of your urine may signal statin-induced liver damage

Statins are a group of medicines that can help lower the level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the blood. LDL cholesterol is a fatty substance that collects on the inside of your arteries – it is a precursor to heart disease. Statins help to prevent cardiovascular complications by reducing the production of LDL cholesterol inside the liver.
Taking statins have therefore had an incalculable impact on millions of lives but taking them is not without its risks.

Like all medicines, statins can cause side effects, and some are serious.

“Occasionally, statin use could cause an increase in the level of enzymes that signal liver inflammation,” warns the Mayo Clinic.

According to the health body, you should contact your doctor immediately if you have dark-coloured urine.

READ MORE: Statins side effects: Three types of fruit to avoid if you’re taking statins

Other signs of liver damage include:

  • Unusual fatigue or weakness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pain in your upper abdomen
  • Dark-coloured urine, or yellowing of your skin or eyes.

“Although liver problems are rare, your doctor may order a liver enzyme test before or shortly after you begin to take a statin,” adds the Mayo Clinic.

It is worth pointing out that the risks of any side effects also have to be balanced against the benefits of preventing serious problems.

A review of scientific studies into the effectiveness of statins found around one in every 50 people who take the medicine for five years will avoid a serious event, such as a heart attack or stroke, as a result.

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How to lower cholesterol without statins

You can also lower cholesterol naturally by making healthy lifestyle changes.

Eating a healthy diet and doing regular exercise can help lower the level of cholesterol in your blood.

In regards to the former, the most important dietary tip is to cut back on foods containing saturated fat.

“Eating too many foods high in saturated fat can raise the level of cholesterol in your blood,” warns the NHS.

The Mediterranean diet varies by country and region, so it has a range of definitions.

But in general, it’s high in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, beans, cereals, grains, fish, and unsaturated fats such as olive oil.

It usually includes a low intake of meat and dairy foods.

The Mediterranean diet has been linked with good health, including a healthier heart.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Fatty liver disease symptoms: The colour of your poo can be a serious warning sign

As the liver becomes inflamed, you may not have any noticeable symptoms. However, alcohol-related liver disease can lead to cholestasis – a reduction or stoppage of bile flow. The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy (MSD) – the world’s best-selling medical textbook – explained further. Pale, light-coloured stools that “smell foul” are a warning sign of this condition.
Bile (a digestive fluid produced by the liver) usually flows between the liver cells and the duodenum – the first segment of the small intestine.

However, when bile flow is reduced or stopped, the pigment bilirubin (a waste product) escapes into the bloodstream.

As this goes on, more bilirubin – waste products made from old and damaged red blood cells – seeps into the bloodstream, accumulating in mass.

Where bilirubin is supposed to be eliminated from the body, signs that it’s not include jaundice.

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More “serious” side effects can include internal bleeding and deterioration of brain function.

“The best treatment is to stop drinking alcohol,” advised the MSD Manual.

The more alcohol a person drinks, the greater the damage to the liver will be.

Miraculously, the liver can continue to function when about 80 percent of the organ is damaged.

However, if the liver damage extends past the point, the person can die from drinking too much alcohol.

There are three distinct phases of fatty liver disease:

  1. Hepatic steatosis
  2. Alcoholic hepatitis
  3. Cirrhosis

Hepatic steatosis

This type of fatty liver disease occurs in 90 percent of people who drink more than the 14 units of alcohol advised by the NHS.

Alcoholic hepatitis

As the condition progresses, the liver becomes inflamed and symptoms may begin to appear.

Cirrhosis

At this stage of the disease, a large amount of the liver tissue is permanently replaced with scar tissue.

This is when liver function is affected, and the liver might shrink in size.

Cirrhosis can lead to further complications such as liver failure, portal hypertension, and loss of brain function.

People with a loss of brain function may become drowsy and confused in everyday life.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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'Add colour to your garden': Best plants & garden tips to make you feel like you're abroad

The Growers is an online plant retailer that has just launched a new collection of plants. Hoping to help Britons recreate a much-deserved holiday abroad in the comfort of their back gardens, the company has introduced a new range of “summer destination” plants.
Customers can choose to be transported to stunning European hotspots including Santorini, Barcelona, Provence, and more – depending which plant box you buy.

Each destination has its own colour theme, enabling you to make your garden look more interesting and unique.

Orange Begonias and leafy Coleus will take you to the white sandy beaches of Madeira, while Dahlias and Geraniums will remind you of the warmth and humidity of the buzzing streets of southern Spanish cities.

Geraniums and Petunias, among other flowers and plants, are often seen growing in Mediterranean countries, but they also grow well in Britain due to their modified leaves.

Andrew Fuller, Head Growing Guru and gardening expert at The Growers, told Express.co.uk more about the colourful plants and how to best keep them alive and well in your garden.

He said: “All of the plants found in our Growing Somewhere Nice destination collections give an amazing pop of colour to your garden.

“Geraniums, Dahlias, Osteospermums and Petunias in particular are available in a range of colours, from pink and yellow to purple and orange, which will give an amazing vibrant splash of colour to your outdoor space,” Andrew added.

“Dahlias have masses of petal-loaded blooms which will help to brighten up your outdoor space, and their compact yet bushy nature will fill your container without crowding out other plants.

“Osteospermums also open to reveal an array of soft tones, with each flower differing slightly in pigment to produce a truly stunning display in your garden borders, containers, and beds.”

Andrew shared his favourite plants in the Growing Somewhere Nice collection, which are the Dahlia Labella Medio Fun Golden Eye, the Fuchsia Jollies Miravel, the Geranium Savannah TexMex Hot Pink, and the Osteospermum Flower Power Pink.

The gardening expert explained that plants need plenty of water to help their growth, saying: “In general, we suggest watering your plants every day.

“However, you should check daily to see how the plant is doing, whether it has too much water or is too dry, and then determine whether or not to water each plant individually.”

He said: “Usually this means your plant is drying out, so if your plant is underwatered, then it definitely needs a good drink of water. You should ensure that water reaches the roots.

“Underwatering can be a cause of brown leaves in outdoor plants, but could equally be caused by scorch from the sun. In this case, if the plant is in a pot, look to move it to a more shaded area of the garden.

“Some plants are more tolerant to direct sunlight than others. If your plant is indoors and you find it frequently dries out, I’d suggest moving the plant to a different space or room, as it could be getting too much sunlight or need more room to grow.”

When it comes to looking after houseplants, as well as watering, Andrew said that “temperature, humidity and ventilation” should also be considered.

He said: “Make sure your houseplants are getting sufficient light, and choose a pot that is an appropriate size for your plant.

“Some summer plants can also be brought indoors for the colder months.

“Plants such as Begonias, Coleus and Geraniums can be kept indoors, in a conservatory for example, over the colder winter months and then all being well, can be planted back outside once the spring frosts have passed the following year,” Andrew added.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Bowel cancer: Change in colour of your poos? Warning of disease when spotting this colour

In most cases, blood in the stool is from piles, especially if it is bright red, fresh blood, according to Cancer Research UK.

Piles are like swollen veins in the back passage. These veins are fragile and can easily get damaged when you pass a bowel motion, causing a little bleeding.

Piles usually come with other symptoms too, so if the only symptom you are experiencing is blood in your stools, it is unlikely to be piles, according to the NHS.

Blood from higher up in the bowel, meanwhile, doesn’t look bright red, but goes dark red or even black.

This can make your bowel motions look like tar, according to Cancer Research, and could be a sign of cancer higher up in the bowel.

READ MORE: Green tea benefits: Cancer prevention and other possible benefits backed by evidence

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Kirstie Allsopp: Location star shares interior warning over ‘unflattering’ paint colour

Another user said: “I love darker tones especially greys as a back drop for paintings, the other colours pop and sing and you don’t notice the grey at all, it’s about balance in my opinion.

“Like in nature the colours are often enhanced by a stormy sky in a breathtaking way and you appreciate them all the more.”

Kirstie responded to this Twitter user too and said: “This is true but it doesn’t work indoors where there is less light.”

For those looking for an alternative grey colour, Kirstie recommended the colour “Pointing” by Farrow & Ball.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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WhatsApp in Pink? Why trying to change the colour of your app could have dire consequences

WhatsApp has stuck with its trusty trademark shade of green for years. But if you’re not a fan of the colour, it might be tempting to click a link from a friend or colleague inviting you to switch to WhatsApp In Pink.

As the imaginative name suggests, this claims to be a version of the world’s most popular messaging service with the green expunged and replaced with a vibrant shade of pink. Unfortunately, this is not a new colour option for WhatsApp users. Instead, it’s a scam designed to wrestle complete access to your smartphone from you.

With access to everything stored on your device, hackers could steal contact information for friends and family – allowing them to send them the link and continue to spread WhatsApp Pink, copy photos and videos from your device, siphon credit card information and other personal details, and much more.

WhatsApp users have highlighted the new scam to bring awareness to the ploy, which is currently being used by cyber crooks worldwide. The link sends users to a webpage to download an APK to their smartphone. APKs are the file used to package Android apps. While it’s possible to download apps from the web to your Android phone, most security experts warn against this practice unless you really know what you’re doing – or who you’re downloading from.

While Google scans every Android app uploaded to its Play Store for malware (and even then, some scam apps manage to slip through the net!), anyone can upload a fraudulent app to the web without any checks – and start sending out the link to unsuspecting users. And that seems to be exactly what has happened with the WhatsApp In Pink attack.

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Internet security researcher Rajshekhar Rajaharia highlighted the latest scam, posting on Twitter: “Beware of WhatsApp Pink!! A Virus is being spread in WhatsApp groups with an APK download link. Don’t click any link with the name of WhatsApp Pink. Complete access to your phone will be lost.”

Unfortunately, for fans of pink, WhatsApp doesn’t allow users to customise the green shade of its messaging app. While you can set custom background images for your chat windows, and choose between a light and dark theme for the entire app… there’s still plenty of green elements to be found within the service.

This article originally appeared on Daily Express :: Tech Feed