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Guide: Where To Pre-Order LEGO Luigi – LEGO Super Mario Adventures With Luigi Starter Course

Update 9th Aug, 2021: Pre-orders for the LEGO Luigi Starter Course and LEGO Bowser’s Airship are live on My Nintendo Store UK.


Where To Pre-Order LEGO Luigi

It might have taken a while (a year to the day, in fact) for Luigi to catch up with his brother, but come August 1 you’ll be able to have a proper fraternal reunion in bricky blocky form. Yes, LEGO Luigi is on the way as part of the new LEGO Super Mario Adventures with Luigi Starter Course set scheduled for release at the start of August.

LEGO Luigi is interactive in much the same way as his brother, with a tiny LCD screens powered by two AAA batteries that react to movement, colour and certain special bricks. His eyes, mouth and belly react to these inputs and a tiny speaker in the figure adds trademark sounds and musical phrases from the series.

Luigi’s phrases are unique to him, of course, and his Starter Set comes with new characters, including a Pink Yoshi and a showdown with Boom Boom. Luigi can also interact with all the other available LEGO Super Mario sets, so you don’t have to worry about compatibility (you can find out more about how they came to be in our interview with the project’s lead designer).

“It’s LEGO Luigi Time! Introducing #LEGOSuperMario Adventures with Luigi Starter Course! Meet up with Pink Yoshi and go face-to-face with Boom Boom.

“Pre-order today! https://t.co/jKB5vhq7ye pic.twitter.com/itcKhyWdRJ

“— Nintendo of America (@NintendoAmerica) April 20, 2021

We’ve scoured the web and tracked down the best options for the LEGO Luigi Starter Set in the UK and US. We’ll update this article with more options and bundles as we find them, so be sure to check back.

Please note that some external links on this page are affiliate links, which means if you click them and make a purchase we may receive a small percentage of the sale. Please read our FTC Disclosure for more information.

Pre-order LEGO Luigi in the UK:

In the UK (and Europe, too), pre-orders for the new Luigi and Bowser sets are now live. Get in! Or, as Luigi would say, er… “Get-a in!”.

Pre-order LEGO Luigi in North America:

Right now we can only find LEGO Luigi up for pre-order from The LEGO Group itself, but we’ll add more retailers if any decent deals present themselves. Bowser’s Airship is up for pre-order at Zavvi.


Can you resist putting down a pre-order on Luigi? Let us know below and don’t forget to check back as we add the best offers when they pop up.

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Read more here >>> Nintendo Life | Latest News

Queen’s Greatest Hits on course for UK No 1 after 40 years: ‘Unbelievable!’ says Brian May

While Roger wrote: “Rumour has it Greatest Hits is currently #1 in the UK midweek charts too. “That’s pretty cool! Thanks to all who are keeping us there! Can we hold it ‘til Friday?”

The Queen drummer also posted a Spotify ad for Queen’s Greatest Hits that’s been digitally displayed in New York’s Time Square.

According to the Official Charts, the album leads by over 4000 sales in the midweek charts.

It turns out the 86 per cent of this is in physical formats, including a collector’s edition of the CD with an exclusive slipcase cover and the limited edition cassette versions available in five different colours.

Author: George Simpson
Read more here >>> Daily Express

Kirsty Gallacher fury: GB News host's outburst at Trump in golf course row

While Kirsty is not widely known for being outspoken, her opinions have become more pronounced since joining the GB News lineup earlier this year. The veteran broadcaster was announced as part of the new channel’s team in March. Many were familiar with her from her lengthy stint presenting Sky Sports News, a role she took on in 1998.

Others will know her as the daughter of Scottish golfing legend Bernard Gallacher who captained a string of Ryder Cup tournaments.

The golf has been a recurring theme in Kirsty’s life and something she speaks about at length in various interviews.

Nothing was different when she sat down with The Daily Telegraph last year and revealed snippets about her personal life.

She noted, however, that one famous Scottish course was no longer a favourite since it had been taken over by Donald Trump.

Kirsty told the publication: “In Britain, I love Gleneagles and St Andrews, the home of golf.

“I used to like Turnberry, before it was bought by Donald Trump.

“Going to St Andrews for the Open is always a wonderful experience.”

Trump bought the entire South Ayrshire complex, including the hotel, from Dubai-based group Leisurecorp in 2014.

JUST INBBC star Monty Don disappoints fan with video request ‘Don’t do that’

This week, she found herself tangled in a row after a viewer accused her of condoning people not being allowed freedom if they haven’t had the coronavirus vaccine.

She and co-host Darren McCaffrey were discussing the rules around travel for British tourists going abroad when she made the suggestion.

One viewer quickly hit out and what they perceived as an “abhorrent” take on the situation.

Writing to GB News on Twitter, the person said: “Utterly disgraceful & abhorrent views from @DarrenGBNews & @TheRealKirstyG on @GBNEWS.

“We’re perfectly happy for some people to be denied their unalienable civil rights & allow the creation of an apartheid state because I had the vaccine so I could go on f****** holiday.”

Kirsty shortly responded to what she believed was a misrepresentation of her words.

She replied: “I absolutely did not say that.

“Please get your facts right.”

“We were merely documenting the government’s proposal.

“I actually have strong views to the contrary.”

Kirsty is appearing on James Martin‘s Saturday Morning today which airs on ITV One at 9:25am.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Celebrity News Feed

Brody Malone on course for Tokyo after 1st night of Olympics gymnastics trials

The Stanford star finished in the top three on four events and leads the all-around with two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak in fourth.

ST. LOUIS — Brody Malone’s rise is no fluke.

The 20-year-old NCAA and national champion surged to the lead at the U.S. Olympic Trials on Thursday night, posting an all-around score of 85.250 to make a compelling case to be on the plane to Tokyo regardless of how things go during Saturday night’s finals.

The Stanford star finished in the top three on four events, putting up the top score on high bar, tying for the best score on floor exercise while finishing second on still rings and third on parallel bars.

Shane Wiskus was second at 84.300, followed by 2017 national champion Yul Moldauer and two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak.

The all-around leader following Saturday night’s finals will automatically earn a spot on the team, with the runner-up also guaranteed a spot provided they finish in the top three in at least three events.Shane Wiskus was second at 84.300, followed by 2017 national champion Yul Moldauer and two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak.

Men’s high-performance director Brett McClure said the emphasis for the four-man team will be on the top all-arounders, and the quartet of Malone, Mikulak and Moldauer have made a pretty compelling case for themselves of the last three weeks.

Malone, Mikulak and Moldauer finished in the top three at the national championships in Fort Worth, Texas, this month. Wiskus was on his way to joining them before a nightmarish turn on high bar in the finals, when he fell three times to tumble all the way to ninth.

There were no major miscues this time around. Not by Wiskus or any of the other top contenders. Moldauer, hobbled by back spasms at nationals that cost him on pommel horse, bounced back by drilling his pommel horse set, his 14.050 the second-highest score on the event of the night.

Mikulak, a six-time national champion, lacked his usual polish on pommel horse and parallel bars. Yet he seemed far more steady than he was during the opening night at nationals three weeks ago.

While Malone, Moldauer, Mikulak and Wiskus appear to be separating themselves, the real drama heading into the weekend might be who gets the “plus-1” spot.

Penn State’s Stephen Nedoroscik, competing in his first Olympic Trials, endured a jittery start. Competing on just one event — pommel horse — Nedoroscik came off early in his set and settled for a 13.650. Not that he seemed particularly bummed about it. Nedoroscik conducted his own post-event interview with a nearby NBC camera, admitting he was “a little lost in the moment” while competing at his first trials.

Alec Yoder had no such issues on pommels. The fans in the stands near him roaring as he powered his way from side to side, Yoder let out a yell as he drills his set, his 15.050 easily the best of the night on an event that has long been a trouble spot for most Americans.

Author:
This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Review: Mario Golf: Super Rush – A Solid Swing, But Par For The Course

Camelot is a studio that has, for many years, dutifully churned out mascot sports games for Nintendo. Players often go back to the retro days when pinpointing the company’s best efforts, though if you go by most recent form — Mario Tennis Aces — the studio is still doing good work. After serving up court-based action it’s now back to the golf course, though Mario Golf: Super Rush feels more like a spiritual successor to Aces than an actual sequel to Mario Golf: World Tour. That’s fine, but Super Rush leaves us with some mixed feelings.

When writing about any game in this series the first task is to assess the story mode, in this case ‘Golf Adventure’. This mode is the ideal starting point and also continues the recent mini-resurgence of Nintendo’s Miis, as you take your little avatar — in this writer’s case an unnaturally chilled out, healthier version of the real person — on a quest to become a pro golfer; there are three save slots, too. There’s actually a story of sorts here, albeit one that goes from being mundane to utterly goofy at the drop of a hat about two thirds of the way through. There’s a very sudden flipping of the script, which is more throwaway than clever. That said, we think young gamers in particular will enjoy the silliness, and we went with it and had fun.

Your Mii starts off in accommodation that’s run by Birdo, meeting up with a few ‘rival’ rookies all keen to be the next big thing. Though you’re typically limited to going from A to B to complete training tasks and challenges there’s a pleasant surprise in how charming the world is, and that this is a game that brings us back to ‘that Switch life’ of buttery smooth 60fps performance in a first-party game. This is achieved courtesy of relatively simplistic visuals, undoubtedly, but ‘chunky’ and ‘colourful’ is perfectly suitable for a Nintendo sports game. You get free movement to explore multiple hub areas / towns and each has its own distinct style. Just remember to visit the shop in each area — the game weirdly doesn’t give any prompts to do this and it’ll help with progress.

So begins a lot of golf, of varying styles, and you very rapidly start to level up. The upgrade system is solid, and occasionally upgrading one stat by two points will lower another by one, so there’s a light amount of balancing at play. Most skilled players will ultimately be able to build a rather impressive all-rounder, but it’s all well implemented; the fact there are ‘speed’ and ‘stamina’ gauges near the top is also a good clue of this mode’s priorities.

It’s simple but effective enough, and as you progress there are some specialised clothes and equipment to pick up that come into play on certain courses. The foundation blocks of adventure and character customisation are there and, though nothing special, it’s absolutely fine and suitable for players of pretty much any level.

The adventure becomes the ideal way to learn about different modes and strategies, with each area and its distinct courses throwing up new ideas or environments to overcome. We will say that the second area introduces ‘cross country’ golf that is downright bad; the idea is that you tackle holes in any order you want, but have to navigate steep changes in elevation and hazards. We can see what the intent was here, but it is not enjoyable, and presumably the development team had an inkling it was a weak point as you never see this style of golf again. So, grit your teeth, clear it, and pretend it didn’t happen.

The rest of the challenges are definitely better, though you won’t be playing much chilled out golf. Some of the progression gets repetitive as you ultimately end up playing timed or speed golf over and over again; this is where the ‘rush’ part of the game and the advertising kicks in.

The gimmick is that you run to the ball after each shot and you are constantly keeping an eye on a countdown. It’s not just about speed, though, as your end score in speed golf, for example, is your completion time plus 30 seconds per shot, so finding the balance between speed and accuracy is important. It’s enjoyable, though we did occasionally want to play a normal round in the story with those cinematic views of shots, as opposed to dashing around constantly.

For chunks of the experience the Adventure feels low on ideas, as you’re told to play 3 holes first, then another set, then a ‘qualifying’ round to upgrade your badge; it’s understandable as it teaches you courses and conditions, but lacks creativity. Then, as mentioned above, there’s a plot twist and you get to learn one of two slightly quirkier techniques and even have a few boss encounters. They’re pretty basic but it is silly fun, and by the time we wrapped up the story the overall impression was positive. This is very B-tier in terms of polish and quality — a topic we’ll revisit in a second — but it is endearing and is a great way to learn the mechanics. There are moments and aspects of the experience that raise a smile, which is mission accomplished.

Depending on ability level, we think the Adventure will take players anywhere from 6-10 hours. You then move onto general play, which is where you can experiment with the varied roster — for example to see what their Super moves do — or jump into multiplayer. After finishing the story we were at the point where our Mii was a stronger option than the actual characters, though you can earn ‘experience’ points to get them up to Star level and improve their clubs. The game falls a little flat here, however. The Solo Challenge area is where you go about levelling characters up, but this merely consists of stroke play or speed golf rounds of courses, and nothing else. There are no intriguing or clever challenges here to make things interesting, which makes levelling up feel like a true grind. The lack of smart challenges — a good feature of its 3DS predecessor — is a disappointment.

There are, however, good options if you want to jump into some customised solo rounds or local multiplayer. Six courses unlock as you play the Adventure or, alternatively, if you want to skip the story the next course will unlock after completing a full round of its predecessor. Standard and Speed golf are featured, and whether setting up a solo or multiplayer session you get good customisation options in terms of how many holes to play, where to start on the course, conditions and more.

Battle Golf is a quickfire new mode that also makes an appearance. This takes place across two arenas, and your goal is to complete three holes before anyone else. You can go for any pin you want, but once a player has completed that hole it disappears from the map, which makes it a rather amusing scramble. When you throw in each character’s star move shots and their impacts — for example knocking your ball away or even transforming it into something like an egg — there’s a nice element of chaotic wackiness to the battles. With only two courses and such short matches, however, it’s not going to hold attention for long.

Nevertheless, playing any of the modes in multiplayer works well, with Camelot covering most bases in terms of control options and deciding how long a round will last. Though the game defaults to (and is easiest to play with) standard button controls, there are also motion controls using the Joy-Con. They’re well implemented and quite intuitive, and the little controller is very accurate in detecting your swing and its power. It’s still far easier to do more complex stuff like applying spin and fade/draw with the buttons but as an alternative that gets you off the couch, the motion controls are accurate and enjoyable to use.

We also got to test the online multiplayer to a limited degree, albeit we had to join a pre-determined lobby and the servers were naturally not under any real strain in the pre-release review period. It was lag free, but that’s not particularly important in multiplayer golf, beyond messing each other up with super shots and limited environmental effects. The setup options are pretty much identical to local multiplayer, and lobbies can also be set for friends only and with or without passwords; you can even add up to two CPU players to fill out spots. If you want to play with family or friends remotely it’s a very competent option, though there’s no in-game communication — not even text messages — so you’ll have to do that through other means. If you still actually use the Nintendo Switch Online app, though, it’ll support voice chat for this title.

Lots of positives then, but there are some disappointing aspects around this title. Wrapping up our thoughts on the online feature-set, it lacks any incentive to compete — if you’re not just playing with friends, there’s not much point to jumping in. There’s no ranking system of any kind and it lacks the basic but enjoyable tournaments of Mario Tennis Aces, which itself was a step back from the excellent online Tournaments in World Tour on 3DS. Super Rush’s portable golfing predecessor setup regular events in which you’d register a score and get a placing (gold, silver, bronze) depending on scores from players around the globe. An equivalent here would have been very welcome.

There’s also an inescapable feeling that, despite a premium price-point, this is a mid/B-tier first-party release from Nintendo. There is a good level of content but it lacks spark, and of the six courses we think only two or three are particularly interesting. In the context of Mario Golf and on capable hardware there’s a lot of variety and environmental manipulation that could have been implemented, but the designs end up being rather safe and uninspired, even in the later unlocks that attempt a little wackiness.

This limited level of creativity is shown in the aforementioned disappointing Solo Challenges, and especially in the Adventure there’s a feeling of corners and budgets cut. There’s poorly used and repetitive voice sampling — the constant ‘Hey Hey’ of the coach irritated this player and others that happened to be in the room — along with basic storytelling. Limited animations of characters and a lack of visual flair for story segments all feel like they come from a discounted first-party effort. The music, also, is rather weak; the core theme is reasonable albeit nothing special, but some clips for between holes (as an example) sound more like royalty-free tracks than something you’d expect to hear in a Mario game.

None of this ruins the experience, not by a long way, and despite these complaints there is still a good amount of content, decent golf mechanics and just enough wackiness to justify having the Mushroom Kingdom cast on board. Those aforementioned irritations do strip away the sense that this is a premium first-party game, though. As enthusiasts, we may have come to expect this in recent Camelot titles, but for those expecting the same quality as other first-party efforts with a $ 60 price tag, they may feel underwhelmed by Super Rush.

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Reviews

Russia issued brutal threat to Royal Navy warship: ‘If you don't change course I'll fire’

The British warship was reportedly warned it would be fired upon unless it changed course. The dramatic encounter came as tensions continue to mount in the region.

More than 20 Russian aircraft and two coastguard ships were said to be shadowing the HMS Defender.

However, Moscow claimed the Royal Navy ship violated territorial waters near the disputed peninsula and opened warning fires.

The UK Government has rejected Russia’s account of the incident and denied that any warning shots were fired.

A BBC journalist who was on-board the British warship said hostile warnings were being issued over radio by the Russian forces.

READ MORE: Russia warship v Royal Navy: Did Russia fire shots at HMS defender?

“No shots were directed at HMS Defender and we do not recognise the claim that bombs were dropped in her path.”

On Wednesday night, Russia released footage filmed from one of its Su-24M attack jets, showing the HMS Defender sailing off the Crimea.

However, no shots were seen being fired in the footage.

The incident is the first time since the Cold War that Russia acknowledged using live ammunition to deter a NATO warship.

The HMS Defender’s Captain, Vincent Owen, said his mission was confident but non-confrontational and insisted he was maintaining course on an internationally recognised shipping lane.

The BBC’s correspondent on the ship, Jonathan Beale, claimed it was a “deliberate move to make a point to Russia”.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: World Feed

US Track reverses course, removes Shelby Houlihan from Olympic trials

It appeared Houlihan, who tested positive for a banned substance, would be allowed to compete Friday. USA Track and Field has since reversed that decision.

EUGENE, Ore — The odds of banned runner Shelby Houlihan running at U.S. Olympic trials diminished sharply late Thursday when the country’s Olympic committee said it would follow all antidoping rules and USA Track and Field received long-awaited official notice of her suspension.

The developments capped a whirlwind day that began with USATF saying it would not bar the American record-holder at 1,500 and 5,000 meters from running in Friday’s preliminary heats until she had exhausted every appeal.

USATF stood by that premise at the end of the day, as well, but said it was comfortable taking Houlihan off the start lists since it had received official word from the Athletics Integrity Unit, which conducted the test that led to the suspension, that Houlihan had been banned for four years.

“Process is important, particularly when individuals’ careers and lives are at stake,” USATF CEO Max Siegel said. “The letter from the AIU, received tonight, formally notifying us of the consequences of the decision is welcomed and, in line with our processes, we will act accordingly.”

Earlier this week, the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld Houlihan’s four-year ban for testing positive for trace amounts of the performance enhancer nandrolone.

RELATED: Runner failed to prove banned substance came from burrito, sport’s court says

RELATED: American record holder Shelby Houlihan receives 4-year ban a week before Olympic track trials

She blamed her positive test on a pork burrito she ate 10 hours before a test in December. Contaminated meats have led to positive tests in other cases, many of which have been dismissed. But Houlihan did not receive any leniency, and her ban would keep her out of the upcoming Olympics and the 2024 Games.

There remains a sliver of hope for Houlihan, but it is very slim. The 28-year-old would have to appeal to and receive fast-track relief from Switzerland’s highest federal court to conceivably be put back in the races.

Her representatives remained quiet about their plans.

But victories in sports cases at the Swiss tribunal are extremely rare, and barring that sort of last-minute reprieve, Houlihan is considered suspended and ineligible to race under international antidoping rules.

“The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, together with USATF, can confirm that we will adhere to the (international antidoping) code and any CAS decisions that govern athlete participation in sanctioned events,” USOPC CEO Sarah Hirshland said late Thursday.

Though USATF runs the Olympic trials, the USOPC has ultimate say on its rules and who it places on the Olympic team.

Houlihan began the day on the start list for both races, which led to phones ringing off the hook at USATF, USOPC, World Athletics and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The main question: Why was the runner, who shared news of her suspension earlier in the week on social media, still on the start list?

“Despite how frustrated people might be with the CAS decision, she is serving a sanction,” USADA CEO Travis Tygart said. “Under the rules, she’s not allowed to compete. It would be illegal for her to do so, unless a court orders differently.”

And so, with only hours to go until the races begin, Houlihan’s slim chances of staying eligible rested on her filing an appeal to the Swiss federal court, and the court issuing an injunction that would allow her to compete while it decides whether to take the case.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Finland election polls: Eurosceptics on course to make huge gains spelling trouble for EU

The 2021 Finnish municipal elections are due to be held on June 13, 2021. Finland’s municipal elections were originally scheduled to take place in April, but were delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to one of the latest polls, the right-wing Finns Party could more than double its vote share compared to the party’s previous election performance.

The last municipal elections held in Finland took place in 2017.

The National Coalition Party won the most votes of any party, with 20.7 percent of the vote.

The Social Democratic Party won 19.4 percent of the vote, while the Centre Party of Finland gained 17.5 percent.

The Green League Party won 12.5 percent of the vote in the last elections, while the Finns Party won only 8.8 percent of the vote.

READ MORE: John Redwood blows top at Brussels’ ‘MAJORITY’ at G7

As per the Helsinki Times, Tuomo Turja, the research director at Taloustutkimus, told YLE: “The Finns Party’s challenge is not so much the other parties, but whether it can get its own supporters to the polling stations.”

The Social Democratic Party, headed by Finland’s Prime Minister, Sanna Marin, are set to get 17 percent of the vote according to the poll.

But the right-wing opposition party, the National Coalition, appeared to have the lead over all rivals in the poll.

The National Coalition could win as much as 19.6 percent of the vote according to the poll, almost a fifth of the vote.

According to the Helsinki Times, Elina Kestilä-Kekkonen, an associate professor of political science at Tampere University, told YLE: “It shows the European trend where confidence in the powers to be was exceptionally high during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Now that the epidemic is losing momentum, the SDP has to step before the public also in regards to other issues.”

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Politico reported that a party ad campaign was recently pulled for discrimination, by suggesting immigrants can jump the public housing queue in Finland’s capital of Helsinki.

He said: “There is no influence in being quiet and nodding.”

After the UK’s exit from the EU in recent years, there have been growing rumblings of anti-EU sentiment elsewhere in Europe.

Anti-EU parties in places like Sweden and Estonia have gained momentum recently.

If momentum continues to grow, other countries could potentially opt to leave the EU behind in the future.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: World Feed