Tag Archives: depression

A new drug could help treat perinatal depression

Until recently, treatment for perinatal depression—an umbrella term that refers to all depressive disorders related to pregnancy and childbirth—was exactly the same as for other depressive disorders. And Matthews says that the conflation of the two kept some people from seeking care. “Mental health and maternal mental health are two different diagnoses,” she says. “And this is where women struggle—we don’t want the Prozacs, we don’t want the heavy drugs without that diagnosis.”

As part of the movement towards treating perinatal depression as its own distinct issue, a new breed of fast-acting antidepressants is popping up. Positive results from a phase III trial of one such option, zuranolone, were published in June, showing that medication might offer at least some hope to those suffering during or after pregnancy.

“I think we’re finally at the point where we might be entering this new frontier of treating postpartum depression, and breaking from the past where we treat it like any disorder,” says Kristina Deligiannidis, who studies and treats reproductive psychiatry at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, and is the lead author on the study. (Deligiannidis disclosed funding from the drug manufacturer, Sage, including grants for the study and private consulting fees.)

Zuranolone is a sister compound to another antidepressant, brexanolone, approved in 2019 to treat postpartum depression. Both are distinct from existing antidepressants in that they take effect within days, instead of weeks. And so far, patients have not reported suicidal ideation as a side effect, a major risk of existing drugs. But brexanolone is delivered by a multi-hour IV drip, while zuranolone is given as a series of daily pills.

In June, zuranolone’s manufacturer released top-line results from another phase III trial that used the drug to treat major depressive disorder. (The results haven’t gone through peer review.) Those results found some initial efficacy that waned over time, at least by one measure of depressive symptoms. But six weeks into the trial, there was no significant difference between those who’d received the placebo and those who’d received zuranolone. By another measure, zuranolone never made any difference. (After the trial concluded, however, blood analysis suggested that some participants hadn’t been taking their medication, which could explain the lack of results. Other trials for depression are ongoing.)

The postpartum trial was much less ambiguous. The drug was effective on multiple measures of depression, and the effect was consistent for six weeks after beginning treatment. In a press release, the company said that it would “discuss next steps” with the FDA.

More importantly for the purposes of patients, says Deligiannidis, at the end of the study, 53 percent of people who took zuranolone were in remission, versus 30 percent who’d taken the placebo.

That may be, at least in part, due to the difference between the broader major depressive disorder and the much more specific perinatal depression.

Although the language of psychiatry refers to major depressive disorder as a single diagnosis, its causes aren’t well-understood. It’s likely that those causes—social, neurological, genetic, and their overlaps—vary from person to person, just as symptoms do, and there are many different “depressions” that fall under the banner of “major depressive disorder.”

By contrast, Deligiannidis says, the triggers for perinatal depression are better understood, and are largely distinct. “I wonder if [perinatal depression] is a more pure subtype overall, in contrast to major depressive disorder in men and women across their lifetimes.”

[Related: Exercise really does seem to help with depression]

“The data so far is that women who develop perinatal depression or postpartum depression have an altered sensitivity to stress during these phases of reproductive hormone variability,” Deligiannidis says. That stress response seems to come from the interaction between a specific neuroreceptor, GABA, and reproductive hormones, but it’s shaped by genetics, previous trauma, or chronic stress. People who develop some form of perinatal depression seem to have GABA systems that aren’t able to adapt to changes in hormones and general stress either during or after pregnancy.

Researchers know that zuranolone, which is closely related to some of those key sex hormones, modulates some GABA receptors, which likely impacts how the entire brain responds to stress. “We know that it’s capable of changing brain function very quickly,” Deligiannidis says, “but that’s kind of the end of what we know.” But it may have something to do with why zuranolone seems to work for perinatal depression.

This lack of clarity isn’t entirely surprising in the field of antidepressants; despite decades of use, it’s still not clear why exactly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, an incredibly common class of antidepressant, alleviate some people’s symptoms and not others.

But even with zuranolone, perinatal depression remains a problem for about 13 percent of people who become pregnant.  Matthews says that was clear as she talked to people she knew about her experience—everywhere she turned, she found friends who could relate to what she described.  Those conversations led naturally into advocacy: she leads an organization that connects women, and especially women of color (who she describes as both under and overdiagnosed) with mental health resources around childbirth.”It affects everyone in their birthing experience, but there’s just not an alignment with conversations around maternal mental health,” she says. “There’s never been anything out there specific to this mental health condition.”

Philip Kiefer

Philip Kiefercovers ecology, the climate, public health, and more from New Orleans. His work has also appeared in Outside, National Geographic, and Sierra.

Author: Sara Chodosh
Read more here >>> Science – Popular Science

Low-Dose Nitrous Oxide Shows Benefit for Resistant Depression

A 1-hour treatment with a low concentration of nitrous oxide, commonly known as “laughing gas,” appears to relieve symptoms of treatment-resistant major depression (TRMD), with effects lasting as long as several weeks, new research suggests.

In a trial with a crossover design, investigators randomly assigned 28 patients with severe TRMD to receive a single 1-hour inhalation of placebo or nitrous oxide once a month over a 3-month period. Participants received an inhalation of placebo; a 25% concentration of nitrous oxide; and a 50% concentration of nitrous oxide. Sessions were conducted 4 weeks apart.

Both doses of nitrous oxide were associated with substantial improvement in depressive symptoms for roughly 85% of participants. However, the 25% concentration had a lower risk for adverse effects, which included sedation, nausea, and mild dissociation, compared to the 50% concentration.

“Twenty-five percent nitrous has similar efficacy, compared to 50% nitrous oxide, and reduced side effects fourfold,” lead author Peter Nagele, MD, chair and professor of anesthesia and critical care, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, told Medscape Medical News.

“We also observed that many patients had a 2-week improvement of depressive symptoms after a nitrous oxide treatment,” said Nagele, who is also a professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience.

The study was published online June 9 in Science Translational Medicine.

Further Refinement

A previous proof-of-principle study conducted by the same researchers demonstrated that a 1-hour inhalation of 50% nitrous oxide had rapid antidepressant effects for patients with TRMD.

The current phase 2 trial “is a follow-up study to our earlier 2015 pilot trial and was designed to further refine the dose of nitrous oxide needed for antidepressant efficacy,” Nagele said.

“An important secondary aim [of the current study] was to determine whether a lower dose — 25% — would reduce side effects, and a third aim was to determine how long the antidepressants effects last,” he explained.

To investigate, the researchers enrolled 28 patients (median [interquartile range (IQR)] age, 39 years [26 – 68] years; 71% women; 96% White) to have three inhalation sessions (placebo, 25%, and 50% nitrous oxide) at 4-week intervals. Twenty patients completed all three inhalation sessions, and four completed ≥1 treatment.

Participants had “sustained and refractory depressive illness,” with a mean illness lifetime duration of 17.5 years and an extensive history of antidepressant drug failure (median, 4.5 [2 – 10] adequate-dose/duration antidepressants).

Some patients had undergone vagus nerve stimulation, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or had received ketamine (4%, 8%, 13%, and 8%, respectively).

The primary outcome was improvement on the 21-item Hamilton Depression rating Scale (HDRS-21) score over a 2-week observation period.

“Stronger Evidence”

Compared to placebo, nitrous oxide significantly improved depressive symptoms in comparison with placebo (P = .01). There was no significant difference between the 25% and the 50% concentrations (P = .58).

The estimated difference in HDRS-21 scores between the placebo and various treatment groups are shown in the following table.

Time 25% Concentration 50% Concentration Combined groups
2 hours −.75 points (P = .73) −.87 (P = .69) −.81 (P = .66)
24 hours −1.41 (P = .52) −1.93 (P = .37) −1.67 (P = .37)
Week 1 −4.35 (P = .05) −2.44 (P = .25) −3 35 (P = .07)
Week 2 −5.19 (P = .02) −7.00 (P = .001) −6.13 (P = .001)

To ensure there where were carryover effects between the two doses, the researchers performed an analysis to ascertain whether order of receipt of the higher dose was related to the 2-week HDRS-21 score; they found no significant effect of trial order (P = .22).

The 20 patients who completed the entire course of treatment “experienced a clinically significant improvement in depressive symptoms from a median baseline HDRS-21 score of 20.5 (IQR, 19.0 to 25.5) to 8.5 (IQR, 2.0 to 16.0) at study completion, corresponding to a median change of −11.0 points (IQR, −3.3 to −14.0 points; P < 0.0001) after the 3-month study period,” investigators note.

The types of treatment response and improvement in depressive symptoms from baseline to study completion are listed in the table below.

Symptom improvement Number of patients
Reduction of ≥ 50% in HDRS-21 points 11 (55%)
Remission 8 (40%)
Improvement in ≥1 category (eg, from severe to moderate) 17 (85%)

There were statistically significant differences in adverse events between the two treatment doses; 47 events occurred following inhalation of the 50% concentration, compared to 11 after inhalation of the 25% concentration. There were six adverse events after inhalation of placebo (P < .0001).

“None of the adverse events were serious, and nearly all occurred either during or immediately after the treatment session and resolved within several hours,” the authors report.

“We need to be remindful that — despite the exciting results of the study — the study was small and cannot be considered definitive evidence; as such, it is too early to advocate for the use of nitrous oxide in everyday clinical practice,” Nagele commented.

Nevertheless, on the basis of the current findings, “the evidence [for the use of nitrous oxide in depression] has become stronger,” he stated.

Rapid-Acting Antidepressants

Commenting on the study for Medscape Medical News, Roger McIntyre, MD, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology, University of Toronto, in Toronto, Canada, and head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, noted that the research into nitrous oxide is “part of an interest in rapid-acting antidepressants.”

McIntyre, who is also the chairman and executive director of the Brain and Cognition Discovery Foundation, Toronto, and was not involved with the study, found it “interesting” that “almost 20% of the sample had previously had suboptimal outcomes to ketamine and/or neurostimulation, meaning these patients had serious refractory illness, but the benefit [of nitrous oxide] was sustained at 2 weeks.”

Studies of the use of nitrous oxide for patients with bipolar depression “would be warranted, since it appears generally safe and well tolerated,” said McIntyre, who is the director of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA).

The study was sponsored by an award to Nagele from the NARSAD Independent Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation and an award to Nagele and other coauthors from the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research at Washington University School of Medicine. Nagele receives funding from the NIMH, the American Foundation for Prevention of Suicide, and the Brain Behavior Foundation; has received research funding and honoraria from Roche Diagnostics and Abbott Diagnostics; and has previously filed for intellectual property protection related to the use of nitrous oxide in major depression. The other authors’ disclosures are listed on the original article. McIntyre has received research grant support from CIHR/GACD/Chinese National Natural Research Foundation; speaker/consultation fees from Lundbeck, Janssen, Purdue, Pfizer, Otsuka, Allergan, Takeda, Neurocrine, Sunovion, Eisai, Minerva, Intra-Cellular, and Abbvie. McIntyre is also CEO of AltMed.

Sci Transl Med. Published online June 9, 2021. Abstract

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This post originally appeared on Medscape Medical News Headlines

Tropical depression likely to form in Gulf Thursday night or Friday

June 16

7 p.m. update
The National Hurricane Center now says “a tropical depression is likely to form by late Thursday or on Friday when the low moves across the western Gulf of Mexico.”

Even if a tropical depression does not form on Thursday, it is possible we will get our first forecast cone for the potential storm. The National Hurricane Center will issue forecasts for a developing system that is expected to become a tropical depression or storm if it is within 48 hours from making landfall.

June 16

1 p.m. update
The National Hurricane Center is maintaining the 70% chance for development over the next 2 days of the system in the Bay of Campeche. Hurricane Hunters are scheduled to fly into the system on Thursday, especially if it begins to show signs of organization. Once a closed low level circulation with thunderstorms surrounding it is located, the system will be designated a tropical depression or storm. Please keep up with the latest since the forecast could change quickly.

June 16

7 a.m. update
The National Hurricane Center now gives the tropical low in the Gulf a 70% chance of developing over the next 2 days and a 90% chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm over the next 5 days.

The potential formation zone extends northward toward the Texas and Louisiana coastlines. Heavy rains could reach the U.S. Gulf Coast as early as Friday.

Impacts here are still “to be determined” based on the exact track the low takes. Once a well-defined low level circulation spins up, we should have a better idea of where it will track and what impacts we’ll get here.

June 15

11:00 p.m. update
The National Hurricane Center now gives the tropical low in the Gulf a 50% chance of developing over the next 2 days and an 80% chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm over the next 5 days.

June 15

12:30 p.m. update
The National Hurricane Center now gives the tropical low in the Gulf an 80% chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm.

June 15

7 a.m. update
The National Hurricane Center gives the tropical low in the Gulf a high (70%) chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm.

June 14

9:45 p.m. update
Tropical Storm Bill has formed off the East Coast. It is no threat to land.

June 14

2 p.m. update
The National Hurricane Center now gives the tropical low in the Gulf a high (70%) chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm.

The potential formation zone has been extended northward toward the Texas and Louisiana coastlines. Heavy rains could reach the U.S. Gulf Coast as early as Friday.

Impacts here are still “to be determined” based on the exact track the low takes. Once a well-defined low level circulation spins up, we should have a better idea of where it will track and what impacts we’ll get here.

June 14

11 a.m. update
Tropical Depression Two forms off the coast of North Carolina. Additional strengthening is expected and this could become Tropical Storm Bill later tonight. This system should begin to weaken by Tuesday night and is expected to dissipate on Wednesday.

8 a.m. update
We continue to monitor a tropical low in the southwest Gulf of Mexico. It is expected to meander around the Bay of Campeche for the first half of the week, then lift northward toward the U.S. Gulf Coast during the second half of the week. The National Hurricane Center keeps the 5-day developments odds at 60% through Saturday evening.

At this time it is still too soon to determine exactly how we will be impacted by it, but if we get any impacts, they will most likely be felt in the Friday to Sunday window of Father’s Day weekend. A tropical depression or storm could form, but a hurricane looks unlikely given the high wind shear expected over the northwestern Gulf.

If it tracks toward Louisiana or farther east, we would be left with hot, dry weather. If it tracks toward the Upper Texas Coast or farther west, we could see some significant rains from it. Once we see where the low pressure consolidates and becomes more organized, then we will get a better feel for where it will track and what our impacts will be.

For now we advise you to stay in awareness mode as the week progresses.

There are two other areas the National Hurricane Center has tagged for tropical development. An area of low pressure off the East Coast has a 70% chance for tropical development during the next 48 hours. This system will be competing to grab the next name on the Atlantic hurricane list: Bill.

A strong tropical wave off the coast of Africa has a 20% chance of tropical development during the next 5 days.

June 13

7 p.m. update
We continue to monitor a tropical low in the southwest Gulf of Mexico. It is expected to meander around the Bay of Campeche for the first half of the week, then lift northward toward the U.S. Gulf Coast during the second half of the week. The National Hurricane Center keeps the 5-day developments odds at 50% through Friday evening.

At this time it is still too soon to determine exactly how we will be impacted by it, but if we get any impacts, they will most likely be felt in the Friday to Sunday window of Father’s Day weekend. A tropical depression or storm could form, but a hurricane looks unlikely given the high wind shear expected over the northwestern Gulf. The next name on the list is Bill.

If it tracks toward Louisiana or farther east, we would be left with hot, dry weather. If it tracks toward the Upper Texas Coast or farther west, we could see some significant rains from it. Once we see where the low pressure consolidates and becomes more organized, then we will get a better feel for where it will track and what our impacts will be.

For now we advise you to stay in awareness mode as the week progresses.

June 13

7 a.m. update
There’s no major change in the modeling or expectations for our Gulf system, but we’re now up to a 50% chance of development over the next 5 days, and there’s high uncertainty as far as any potential impacts to Southeast Texas.

It’s not something you should be overly concerned with at the moment, but it remains an area we’ll continue to monitor.

June 12

2 p.m. update
We are continuing to monitor an area of showers and storms in the Bay of Campeche. The National Hurricane Center gives this disturbance a 10% chance of development over the next 48 hours and a 40% chance over the next 5 days. Slow development will be a possibility over the next few days but it is still way too early to know what impacts, if any, we could see along the Gulf Coast from this disturbance.

7 a.m. update
The area we are monitoring in the Gulf now has a 40% chance of development over the next 5 days. It’s too early for specifics on exact impacts, but the moisture will gradually lift north. For now it’s just something we will be keeping an eye on.

READ MORE: Here’s today’s hour-by-hour forecast and an outlook for the next ten days

June 11

9 a.m. update
The National Hurricane Center has tagged an area of disturbed weather over the Bay of Campeche with a 20% chance for tropical development over the next 5 days.

Slow development will be possible as this system lifts to the north to northwest. It is still too early to determine what impacts our region could see. Residents along the upper Texas coast should keep an eye on the tropics.

June 10

9 a.m. update
No imminent threat for tropical development over the next 5 days.

However, the Climate Prediction Center says conditions may become more favorable for tropical development in the western Gulf of Mexico late next week. Resident along the upper Texas coast should keep an eye on the tropics.

June 9

8 a.m. update
Formation chances with the disturbance in the southern Caribbean continues to be at a 10% chance over the next five days. However, residents along the upper Texas coast should keep up with the tropics. The Climate Prediction Center expects conditions to become more favorable for tropical development in the western Gulf of Mexico late next week.

June 8

6 p.m. update
Formation chances with the disturbance in the southern Caribbean continues to be at a 20% chance over the next five days. However, residents along the upper Texas coast should keep up with the tropics. The Climate Prediction Center says conditions may become more favorable for tropical development in the western Gulf of Mexico late next week.

2 p.m. update
Formation chance with the disturbance in the southern Caribbean has dropped to a 20% chance over the next five days.

10 a.m. update
Some gradual development will be possible with a tropical disturbance in the southern Caribbean over the next few days. Formation chance is just at 30% over the next 5 days, we’ll continue to monitor it.

Regardless of development, this system will produce heavy rainfall across northern Colombia and portions of Central America later this week and into the weekend.

June 7

Our tropical disturbance in the southern Caribbean remains at just a 20% chance of development over the next 5 days, we’ll continue to monitor it.

June 6

There’s a 20% (low) chance of tropical development over the next 5 days in an area just east of Central America in the southern Caribbean Sea. An area of low pressure could develop by the end of the week and may try to gradually strengthen as it moves northwest. We’ll continue to monitor this area.

June 5

No tropical development is expected in the tropical Atlantic in the next 5 days.

However, NOAA is giving us an early heads up with “high confidence” that one or more tropical systems may spin up in the western Caribbean Sea between June 9th and June 15th.

Why?
Because a large area of low pressure known as the “Central American Gyre” is expected to spin up, and these often will produce one or more smaller low pressure systems that can break off and develop into tropical depressions and storms. There’s no way to know exact details at this time and there’s certainly nothing to worry about right now, but we do want you to at least be casually aware of the possibility just in case.

June 4

No tropical development is expected in the tropical Atlantic in the next 5 days.

In the Eastern Pacific, Blanca has weakened to a post-tropical cyclone and is expected to weaken even further as it heads westward into a drier environment with increasing wind shear and cooler waters.

Just east of Blanca, an area of disturbed area is being monitored for potential tropical development. The formation chance is at 60% during the next 5 days. A tropical depression could form late this weekend or early next week while it moves slowly to the west-northwest well off the coast of Mexico.

June 3

No tropical development is expected in the next 5 days.

In the Eastern Pacific, Blanca is now a tropical depression and is expected to weaken even further as it heads westward into a drier environment with increasing wind shear and cooler waters.

June 2

No tropical development is expected in the next 5 days.

In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Blanca continues to move west away from Mexico. It should remain as a tropical storm through midweek but should weaken sometime on Thursday down to a tropical depression.

June 1

Today is the official start of the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season. No tropical development is expected in the next 5 days.

In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Blanca continues to move west away from Mexico. It should remain as a tropical storm through midweek but should weaken sometime on Thursday down to a tropical depression.

May 31

No tropical development is expected as the Atlantic hurricane season kicks off tomorrow.

However, in the Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression Two-E is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm within the next 24 hours as it drifts south of Mexico. This system is expected to remain below hurricane strength and eventually fall apart as it moves over cooler water.

A tropical wave is just west of Two-E and has a slim chance for tropical development during the next five days.

May 26

There are no areas of concern for development for the next 5 days in the Atlantic, Gulf or Caribbean.

May 24

Ana has dissipated and no tropical development is expected during the next five days.

May 23

11 p.m. update
Ana is now a post-tropical cyclone and should dissipate Monday as it moves northeast farther out into the Atlantic.

3 p.m. update
Ana has now been downgraded to a tropical depression with 35 mph winds. Ana is forecast to become a remnant low by tonight as it moves northeast out farther into the Atlantic.

12 p.m. update
Ana is barely holding on as a tropical cyclone in the Atlantic as it churns around 425 miles northeast of Bermuda. Ana’s maximum sustained winds were around 40 mph Sunday morning and was moving northeast at approximately 14 mph. An increase in forward speed was expected in the next day or so. Tropical storm-force winds extended outward up to 35 miles and there are no impacts to land. Ana is expected to weaken and dissipate by Monday.

5 a.m. update
Still plenty of moisture in SE Texas from the disturbance that moved through early Saturday morning, with light rain expected in Houston and heavier rain to our southwest. Elsewhere, 340 miles to the northeast of Bermuda our first named storm, Ana, continues to gradually move northeast over open water. Ana will not make landfall anywhere, and will dissipate early next week.

May 22

11 p.m. update
The tropical disturbance that brought us our rain chance today continues to lift to the north.

Subtropical Storm Ana formed early Saturday and is now making its way northeast out to sea in the Atlantic. It is currently 270 miles northeast of Bermuda and is moving northeast at 9 mph. Ana currently has sustained wind speeds of 45 mph but is expected to weaken over the next 24 hours… eventually dissipating by Monday.

1 p.m. update
Our tropical disturbance responsible for bringing showers to SE Texas today continues to spin through the Hill Country. The moisture that it continues to pump into our area has produced widely scattered showers, especially west of I-45.

SubTropical Storm Ana, our first named storm of the season, is lifting away from Bermuda and poses no threat to land.

10 a.m. update
Subtropical storm Ana formed in the Atlantic Ocean early Saturday, according to the National Hurricane Center. Ana was located about 200 miles northeast of Bermuda Saturday morning with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The system was expected to continue its slow and erratic motion, and then dissipate in a few days, forecasters said.

Here in the Houston area, the Gulf tropical disturbance continues to weaken and move to the north-northwest. Outer rain bands will continue to impact the Houston area today. A wind advisory has been extended for the Bolivar Peninsula, coastal Jackson, Matagorda, Brazoria and Galveston Island until 4 p.m. Coastal flood advisories continue for Chambers, coastal Brazoria, Galveston and Harris counties until 7 a.m. Sunday.

7 a.m. update
The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings for several rivers and streams across the region as rain-swollen banks continue to be impacted by scattered showers today. Impacts from the disturbance continue to include locally heavy rainfall, breezy conditions along the coast, elevated tides and marine hazards. The center of the system should push northwest throughout the day. The highest rain chances through noon should be along and west of the Brazos River. Those rain chances will expand across the area later today.

5 a.m. update
The disturbance in the Gulf moved inland near Port Lavaca, and the National Hurricane Center doesn’t expect any more development. Locally, our impacts remain unchanged from prior updates, scattered showers and storms with breezy 30-40mph wind gusts possible, especially along the coast. The NWS has issued a Coastal Flood Warning through 7 a.m. for our coastal communities.

In a much different part of the world, northeast of Bermuda, we now have our first named storm: Subtropical Storm Ana has formed. This storm will have no direct impact on land, and is only notable for being our first named storm of the year, arriving before hurricane season officially begins.

May 21

1 p.m. update
The NHC is now giving the disturbance in the Gulf a 30% chance of development (becoming a Tropical Depression or Tropical Storm).

The impacts in our area will be minor regardless of development. We can expect scattered showers and storms along with wind gusts over 30 mph overnight and through Saturday, with rain tapering off from east to west on Sunday.

Still, if it makes landfall in Texas at tropical depression or storm strength, it’ll be the first in recorded history to do so before June 1, the customary start of the Atlantic hurricane season.

1 p.m. update
A large area of thunderstorms in the western Gulf is drifting northwest towards the Texas coast.

Conditions are slightly favorable for development and the National Hurricane Center is giving it a 60% chance. Whether it develops or not, it’ll give us at least scattered, heavy downpours overnight and through the day on Saturday.

High rain rates along with the slow movement of the storms means some flooding will be possible. Gusty winds and coastal flooding may also be an issue near the coast.

May 20, 2021

According to the latest NOAA outlook, the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season will be busier than normal, but it’s unlikely to be as crazy as 2020’s record-shattering year.

They’re expecting 13-20 tropical storms, 6-10 hurricanes, and 3-5 major hurricanes.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30, although storms can form before and after those dates.

During hurricane season, ABC13 meteorologists will provide daily tropical weather updates on this page.

RADAR MAPS:
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Montgomery/Walker/San Jacinto/Polk/Grimes Counties
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Author: Travis Herzog

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