Tag Archives: Expats

UK expats may be forced to leave Spain as it misses out on green list: 'Incomprehensible'

Transport secretary Grant Shapps confirmed a list of countries Britons can travel to from May 17. Sadly for many in the UK, Spain did not make the green list.
However, mayor of Benidorm Toni Perez has shared his disappointment at Spain missing out.

He has insisted the Costa Blanca resort is “green” and the decision not to put it on a par with Portugal and Gibraltar is “incomprehensible”.

Mr Perez has demanded a meeting with the UK Ambassador to Spain to find out more on the “reality” of the holiday destination.

Benidorm town hall officials pointed out today the cumulative 14 day incidence per 100,000 inhabitants is just 43 cases in the Valencia region, which includes the Costa Blanca region.

DON’T MISS

In Alicante and Benidorm specifically, the number of cases was 10 points lower.

A town hall statement said: “Benidorm has better data than Portugal (58.9).

“The evolution of vaccination is also going at a good rate in the Valencian Community with the arrival of more vaccines in the last month, with 31 percent of people vaccinated with one dose, and 13.4 percent with the full vaccination schedule.

“For the mayor of Benidorm this situation is incomprehensible.

“He has asked to be able to personally inform the British ambassador about the reality of the Benidorm tourist destination in which the British market accounts for 40 percent of the tourist demand in the city.”

Last month, Mr Perez urged the UK and Spain to allow British holidaymakers to return to the area.

He said: “We know the Brits want to visit our wonderful beaches and embrace our marvellous sunshine — and that day can’t come soon enough for us, too.

“Benidorm without the Brits is just not the same. We are missing you as much as you are missing us.”

Some British expats have been struggling with the lack of tourism in Spain due to restrictions and the country not making the “green” list is the latest blow to their livelihood.

A number of expats have had to receive help to return to the UK as they have not been able to make a living without tourism.

This was the case for mum-of-three Lindsey Evers and her partner Peter Chadwick, originally from Halifax, who have to return to the UK 10 years after emigrating.

Lindsey has not been able to work in her job as a waitress and the family has been surviving with the help of a food bank run by Benidorm’s British Businesses Association while they arrange their return home.

Additional reporting by Natalia Penza.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Expats: 'Floods' of Britons expected to relocate to Portugal in 2021

Portugal is set to see “floods” of Britons looking to relocate to the nation this year after Brexit. According to a recent survey conducted by the Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in the UK, 59 percent of those who took part in their annual survey said they were looking to move there permanently once the Government reopens travel.
The annual June 2020 report from Portugal’s immigration authorities revealed that British residents are the single largest group of foreign residents in Portugal.

The report, by the Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in the UK, states: “Portugal’s 2021 census, currently underway, looks likely to show a large increase in this number, given the twin pressures of Brexit and the pandemic.”

In a bid to deal with what the chamber is describing as “pent up interest”, they are set to host a series of live and virtual Moving to Portugal webinars and events over the coming weeks.

By identifying the data of Britons who have already sought advice from the Chamber, they found 57 percent were looking to move within the next 12 to 24 months.

READ MORE: Holidays ‘Green list’ expected tomorrow – latest predictions

Around 37 percent of respondents were also looking to either move an existing business to Portugal or start a new business there.

The nation’s business opportunities are one of the key draws of the country for Britons according to the Chamber’s general manager Christina Hippisley.

She said: “Every day we are receiving calls and emails from British residents just waiting to get on a plane to Portugal.

“The most common enquiries are about what residency options there are in Portugal for Brits now we are no longer part of Europe, followed by questions about how to move their businesses there and work remotely.

DON’T MISS
Spain to maintain coronavirus restrictions into holiday season [COMMENT]
UK hotels: Inside Devon Four in a Bed featured B&B [VIDEO]
What countries are expected to be on the green list? [FULL LIST]

“Portugal appeals to a relatively wealthy demographic. On top of its existing fan base of older, more established retirees and second homeowners, the country’s growing reputation as a tech investment and manufacturing hub is attracting a new breed of younger, working families keen to live there permanently.”

Previously, some experts have suggested Portugal could overtake Spain as “the place to be” for expats.

According to expatnetwork, Portugal could be set to become more popular due to the onset of new post-Brexit requirements to gain permanent residency in Spain.

“In order to retire to countries in the EU, now that the UK is no longer a member, it is necessary first to apply for a visa,” explained an expert from expatnetwork.

“Those who are thinking about retiring to Spain or who plan to move there but do not intend to work there, can either choose a Golden Visa or the Non-Lucrative Visa (NLV).

“The Golden Visa requires you to invest €500,000 (approximately £433,551) in property and so is out of the reach of many British retirees.”

The NLV, meanwhile, is said to be “causing difficulty” for some British expats – particularly retirees.

“You have to demonstrate an income of €33,893 (approximately £29,388) a year for a couple and €47,451 (£41,144) for a family of four,” continued the expatnetwork expert.

“Portugal offers similar benefits with regard to climate, lifestyle, and low cost of living,” they explained.

“Portugal has a similar visa to Spain’s NLV, the Passive Income Visa, which has a significantly lower annual income requirement – €11,970 (approximately £10,379) for a couple and €16,658 (approximately £14,444) for a family of four).

“The visa also does not restrict you from working or setting up a business as the Spanish NLV does.”

They added: “Add to that the tax advantages and the fact that you can work in Portugal if you want to, and there is a clear case for considering retiring to Portugal instead of Spain if you only have limited income.”

Luckily, there is plenty of support for those eyeing a move to Portugal.

“If you are planning on moving to Portugal, you are following a well-trodden path, which means that there are clear processes in place for how to achieve what you need to,” commented Ms Hippisley, general manager of the Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in the UK.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Spain expats given crucial vaccine update – Benidorm, Alicante & Canary Islands rules

Around 285,000 British expats currently live in Spain. As the vaccination roll-out pushes forward around the world, it may be confusing for expats to know where to obtain their jab – particularly if they aren’t registered to a health centre.
For those living in the Valencia region, which is home to Alicante and Benidorm, the FCDO explains they should go directly to their “local health centre to register”.

It continues: “You will be given a provisional health card to cover the vaccination and any other public health needs.

“You should visit the Valencia regional government health service website to check and update your contact details.”

The FCDO has also added new advice for those living in the Canary Islands.

It states: “We are awaiting further information from the Government of the Canary Islands regarding their vaccine plan for those who do not have public healthcare, and will update this section in due course.

“You should call 012 for information about registering for the vaccine.”

The FCDO continues: “British nationals living overseas should seek medical advice from their local healthcare provider in the country where they reside.

“Information about vaccines used in other national programmes, including regulatory status, should be available from the local authorities.

“We are aware that some people have been able to sign-up to the vaccine list in their region by registering temporarily at their local health centre with their residency document.

“This temporary registration is known as an ‘alta temporal’.

“You should contact your local health centre for further information.”

According to Statista, as of April 28, the total number of COVID-19 vaccines administered in Spain was over 15 million.

Meanwhile in the UK, as of the week ending April 25 an additional 2,941,890 NHS vaccinations for COVID-19, including both first and second doses, were reported in England compared with the previous week.

This took the total number of vaccinations administered as of April 25 to 39,155,196.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

British expats clash over Brexit: 'If you voted Leave, keep your gob shut!'

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: UK Feed

British expats in Europe have become concerned as the Brexit trade deal agreed last year leads to seismic changes to life abroad. Now, like all other foreigners from outside the EU, Britons who were once able to enter and leave European countries on a whim will be limited to stays of 90 days within every 180 days. Those wishing to register as residents in Spain will have to jump through a number of bureaucratic hoops to prove earnings of £2,000 a month — and £500 more for each dependent — as well as acquire Spanish driving licences.

Expats still in Europe have described how many are packing up and heading back home as a result.

But many have also fallen out in the aftermath of Brexit, as highlighted by a report in The Times.

Michel Euesden, owner of Euro Weekly, an English language newspaper in southern Spain, said: “Removal companies have never been busier. There’s an abundance of people leaving.

“We were warning about the consequences of Brexit, but nobody took any notice. Now our lives have changed forever.”

Baz Rhodes, a pensioner and paragliding guide who lives in The Balearics hit out at Leave voters.

He said: “They think they’re the best in the world, these little Englanders. The ones who voted for Brexit should keep their gobs shut.”

Mark Sampson, a former bar owner and fervent Brexiteer, said: “I get Remainers trying to tell me their arguments. I’ve had a few shouting at me in bars.

“I am 6ft tall and 20 stone so no one’s going to take me on in a fight, but if they want to talk about Brexit, I give them both barrels.”

Gareth Thomas, a 69-year-old former RAF engineer from Kent, told The Times that he has faced threats over his views on the EU.

He added: “I have been threatened with violence.

READ MORE: Brexit sends expats into rage as Britons ‘have to give up being Britis

“I was told if I didn’t shut up this person was going to smash my face in. Brexiteers target people like me because they think if we ‘traitors’ had kept our mouths shut, it would have been plain sailing and we would have got a better deal from Europe.”

Daphne Vallins, 64, returned from southern Spain to live back at home in Surrey, is blaming the new bureaucracy for the decision.

She said: “I did not want to apply for residence status. It would mean paying £100 a month in private health insurance, changing my UK driving licence into a Spanish one and having to pay my taxes in Spain.”

A petition to lobby the UK Government to negotiate post-Brexit equal rights for UK citizens with properties in EU countries to those automatically awarded to EU citizens staying in the UK was launched last month in the hope millions of British expats living in the bloc could stay for longer than 90 days in a row.

DON’T MISS
Dominic Cummings’ attack on Brexiteers: ‘Thick as mince’ [INSIGHT]
Sturgeon’s EU crisis – Scotland hard border ‘inevitable’ [ANALYSIS]
EU crisis as Macron threatened to block huge trade deal [INSIGHT]

Britons in Europe are being denied access to bank accounts, jobs, healthcare and university places due to post-Brexit red tape.

Those living in Spain, Italy and France say they have been hit by new rules which are poorly understood by local officials who are now demanding they produce documents which are difficult or impossible to obtain.

Amid the chaos, a UK Government spokesperson said: “The rights of UK nationals to continue living, working and studying in their EU Member State are protected by law. Anyone legally resident before January 1, 2021, can stay but should register their residence.

“The UK Government has been running a public information campaign across Europe to inform UK nationals about the actions they may need to take to secure their rights and access to services.

“This includes outreach events, adverts on social media and in newspapers, and support through our network of Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates.”

Expats: Britons ‘should look to Portugal instead of Spain’ for post-Brexit relocations

Author
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Since Brexit was finalised at the end of 2020, moving to Europe has become quite different for Britons. Though Spain has been a popular choice for those seeking sun, sea, and sand, new visa requirements have begun to cause concerns for those hoping to relocate overseas.
According to expatnetwork, Portugal could be the new destination to replace Spain.

Already a popular haunt for British expats, home to around 60,000 UK citizens, Portugal offers many of the same perks as Spain but might be the easier option in a post-Brexit landscape.

This is largely to do with new requirements, particularly for those who are hoping to relocate after retirement.

“In order to retire to countries in the EU, now that the UK is no longer a member, it is necessary first to apply for a visa,” explained an expert from expatnetwork.

READ MORE: Holidays: Spain, Portugal, France, Italy & Greece latest FCDO updates

“You have to demonstrate an income of €33,893 (approximately £29,388) a year for a couple and €47,451 (£41,144) for a family of four.

“This requirement will rule out the option of retiring to Spain for many.

“Those who are retiring on a basic UK State pension, £9,339 in 2021, will not qualify.”

There is the option to look for a work permit, but this is likely not the route those hoping to retire into the sun are looking for.

“Younger families looking to move to Spain will generally have to look to get a work permit or a visa allowing them to set up a business, as they would have to demonstrate an income of €47,451 (approximately £41,144) from sources other than work to qualify for an NLV,” said the expert.

This is why Portugal is so enticing, according to expatnetwork.

“Portugal offers similar benefits with regard to climate, lifestyle, and low cost of living.

“Portugal has a similar visa to Spain’s NLV, the Passive Income Visa, which has a significantly lower annual income requirement – €11,970 (approximately £10,379) for a couple and €16,658 (approximately £14,444) for a family of four),” they explained.

“The visa also does not restrict you from working or setting up a business as the Spanish NLV does.

“The cost of property and the cost of living in Portugal is around 10 percent lower than in Spain and the icing on the cake is that you also have the potential benefit of the Non-Habitual Resident Scheme which will allow you to pay only 10 percent tax on a UK pension and no tax on some other sources of income.”

Overall the cost of living in Portugal averages out at nine percent lower than in Spain.

“Add to that the tax advantages and the fact that you can work in Portugal if you want to, and there is a clear case for considering retiring to Portugal instead of Spain if you only have limited income,” the expert concluded.

Spain: Foreign Office issues major vaccination update for British expats – regional rules

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) has issued a new update on its Spain travel advice page. It is specifically aimed at British expats living abroad in the country.
In its latest update for Spain, the FCDO explains it has provided “new information on how to get COVID-19 vaccine if you live in Spain but are not registered for public healthcare.”

It reads: “We have received the following information from certain Spanish regional healthcare authorities for those who are not registered for public healthcare (for example, those who have private health insurance).

“Please be aware that this is information from the Spanish authorities and is subject to change.”

The FCDO aims to provide as much insight as possible for Britons, particularly as “some information may only be available in Spanish.”

DON’T MISS
India travel: Nation placed on red list over variant fears [UPDATE]
Flights: easyJet, Jet2, TUI, Ryanair & BA updates [COMMENT]
Can you take a lateral flow test to allow you to travel? [INSIGHT]

The availability of vaccines and how to access them vary depending on which region people are residing in.

The FCDO explains those in Andalusia “should visit Andalusia’s health service website for details on how to register for the vaccine. More information on the campaign is available on Andalusia’s vaccine website.”

For those in the Balearic Islands, a telephone number is provided where expats can “register for the vaccine”. They are also advised to utilise the Balearic Islands health service website.

For those living in the Canary Islands, the FCDO says it is “awaiting further information from the government of the Canary Islands regarding their vaccine plan for those who do not have public healthcare”.

It adds: “You will be given a provisional health card to cover the vaccination and any other public health needs.”

The FCDO is updating its list as more information becomes available in a bid to give British citizens the most up-to-date insight.

“UK nationals living in Spain who do not live in the areas listed above, should contact their local health centre or private insurance company for more information,” continues the information on the FCDO travel advice page.

“The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is the UK authority responsible for assessing the safety, quality and efficacy of vaccines.

“It has authorised the Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford/AstraZeneca and Moderna vaccines for temporary supply and use in the UK.

“British nationals living overseas should seek medical advice from their local healthcare provider in the country where they reside.

“Information about vaccines used in other national programmes, including regulatory status, should be available from the local authorities.”

This article originally appeared on Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Spain: Expats share frustration as 'no clear answer' on getting coronavirus vaccine

Spain[1] is a popular tourist destination, with many Britons often flocking there for summer holidays. Some people who have decided to move there have opened up on waiting to get the coronavirus[2] vaccine.
One woman opened up on her frustration after struggling to find out how to get her vaccination.

“My husband and I are both retired expat residents who have lived in Sevilla since 2017 where we registered with the town hall and are paying our income taxes,” she told The Olive Press.

The expat explained her and her husband are not registered with the public health system and instead have private health insurance.

She continued: “We only want to learn how we can be included in the proper database so that we will be contacted when the vaccine becomes available for our age group.”

She continued to say she was struggling to find out how to register for the vaccine.

DON’T MISS

“I have made appointments with various agencies during the last week and have been asking this question repeatedly,” she added.

“But instead of getting a clear answer, we have been sent from one to another without any result.”

Spain has been rolling out vaccines for all residents this year and is currently on track to give the first coronavirus vaccine to around 70 percent of the population by the summer.

While the expats suggested they were struggling to find out about their vaccine, the Spanish government offered reassurance.

The government stated everyone living in Spain will be able to get the vaccination.

A spokesperson said: “Everyone living in Spain will have access to the vaccine, whether they are registered in the public health system or have private health insurance.

“It is up to the individual regional health authorities to put a system in place to notify them. If in doubt, people should contact their local health authorities to ask how this is being done.”

A spokesperson for the British Embassy in Spain added: “The Spanish government’s vaccination strategy is clear that, as a matter of public health, all people living in Spain are eligible for the vaccine, regardless of national residency status.

“At the current time, those in the priority groups are being vaccinated – irrespective of nationality or type of sickness insurance. The vaccination strategy is updated regularly to include new priority groups as the number of doses available gradually increases.”

The embassy offered further advice for those unsure of how to get the vaccination.

“Those UK nationals who are already registered in the public health system should be contacted by their regional health service to arrange an appointment,” it said.

“UK nationals living in Spain can contact their local health centre or insurer for more information.”

References

  1. ^ Spain (www.express.co.uk)
  2. ^ coronavirus (www.express.co.uk)