Tag Archives: Gardening

Gardening expert shares ‘best way’ to permanently remove perennial weeds from paths

Perennial weeds include brambles, dandelions, stinging nettles, docks and ragwort.

Horsetail, ground elder and bindweed are also perennial weeds that can be hard to remove.

Annual weeds include chickweed, crabgrass, knotweed and groundsel.

Annual weeds can appear in either the cooler seasons or warmer seasons.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening expert shares simple 'biological' method to remove slugs from your garden

Most gardeners will stumble across a slug, or evidence of one, at some point in the garden. Whether they’re hiding under your containers or leaving holes in your plants, they can be a nuisance. However, slugs are so common in British outdoor spaces that gardeners should be prepared for some damage.

Controlling them can be tricky, particularly around young or vulnerable plants.

Fortunately, gardening expert Jane Perrone has shared a “biological” method for deterring the critters.

Jane is working alongside Mash Direct, who have launched a campaign to get people across the country growing their own vegetables and herbs.

The garden pro spoke exclusively to Express.co.uk about how to keep slugs out of your vegetable patch.

She said: “I try not to panic about pests, and I never think of them as having a silver bullet solution that’s just going to knock them all out and they’re never going to be there again.

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“They get inside the slugs – it’s quite bizarre how it happens.

“But the good news is, it’s totally safe.

“If a slug is eaten by a hedgehog, it’s not going to cause a problem for the hedgehog.”

Like any pest control, it’s important you follow the instructions to the letter when using nematode worms.

Jane said it’s also important to note that not all slugs are bad in your garden.

Some of them don’t eat fresh greens, but will only eat decomposing material.

If you come across slugs in your compost pile, they’re probably eating all the decomposing things, so they don’t need to be killed.

“The more you can educate yourself about different kinds of pests and what they’re up to and different kinds of insects on your plot, that helps you understand what you need to do,” she added.

You can purchase slug nematodes online for around £13, depending on how many you buy.

Mash Direct, the award-winning ‘field-to-fork’ vegetable accompaniments brand, is launching the ‘Grow Your Own’ campaign to encourage more people across the UK to grow their own vegetables and herbs and to increase their vegetable intake to harness the associated health and wellbeing benefits.

From May 24 – July 2, Mash Direct is challenging individuals to grow their own vegetables and herbs in their gardens, allotments and window sills.

If they showcase the evidence on social media, tagging @mashdirect and #GrowWithMash, they will be placed in a draw to win free gardening tools and Mash Direct products.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening expert recommends ‘fast-acting’ weed killer that removes them ‘within hours’

It’s often difficult to know which weed killers work best. Some people recommend using DIY methods, while others go for natural or household solutions. Others choose to use chemical weed killers which can be damaging to surrounding plants and their environment.

“Next, crowd out any unwanted weeds by keeping your soils pH level balanced and not mowing your grass too low.

“Growing a densely planted garden lawn can repress any weeds that might not belong.”

Another method, which the expert claimed “keeps weeds from ever popping up” is using corn gluten.

They said: “Use corn gluten to keep weeds from ever popping up.

However, not all corn gluten meal is the same.

Check the label said it’s a pre-emergent herbicide as animal feed products with similar wording are unlikely to work.

“Don’t let weeds get the better of you,” the expert added.

“Use these natural solutions to prevent and get rid of weeds naturally.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening weeds: FIVE dangerous weeds to eradicate from your green spaces

Gardening fans have ideal weather to curate their hobby right now, with glorious wall-to-wall sunshine and temperatures clocking in above 25C. Forecasters don’t expect this to change, giving people a wide window to watch their summer plants blossom. But as they spend more and more time outside, they need to keep their eyes peeled for some shady figures in their Sun-soaked gardens.

Giant hogweed

An infamous plant in the UK, giant hogweed is dangerous to both plants and humans.

Their canopy-like flowers grow high and wide, preventing other plants from getting sunlight.

They also produce an abrasive sap which causes burns and blisters on contact with human skin.

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Wolfsbane

Another pretty plant, wolfsbane blooms with purple blossoms in the autumn and winter.

But much like the other plants on the list, coming into contact with it warrants immediate medical advice.

Wolfsbane can cause laboured breathing, nausea, weak, irregular heartbeats and cold, clammy skin.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening: How to make a plant self-watering system from plastic bottles

Method 2

Another way you can make a slow-release water irrigator from a plastic bottle is by poking four to five holes in the cap of a bottle.

Remove the cap from the plastic bottle, pop it down on a hard surface and using a drill or nail, poke several holes in the cap.

The more holes, the faster the water will flow from the bottle.

Making the holes too big will mean the water will flow from the bottle more quickly, but making them too small could mean they get clogged up with soil.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening: Alan Titchmarsh shares 'vital' tip to grow 'lovely' tomatoes this summer

The expert also shared a very peculiar tip to water the tomatoes, and what he believes is the best way to do it.

“When it comes to watering them, what I like to do with all my outdoor tomatoes is right next to them I dig a hole to sink in an empty flowerpot.

“Quite near the tomato roots.

“And then when you come to water the plant, all you have to do is fill up that flowerpot and the water is going right where is needed, to the roots,” explained the gardener.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening: Alan Titchmarsh explains how to fix bare patches in the centre of your lawn

Alan watered the new patch of turf with a watering can.

He added: “So as well as being house proud, try to be a bit garden proud as well.

“With a little nip and a tuck, you can stop it looking like the aftermath of a pop festival and turn it into something rather more defined.”

The video was viewed over 130,000 times and has received a plethora of positive comments from fellow gardeners.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening: How to deal with slugs in your garden and prevent them from damaging plants

With more people spending time in their gardens throughout the pandemic, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) saw an 88 percent increase in pest and disease enquiries last year. The organisation found that slugs and snails were the most popular pests in Britons’ gardens, and they reached the top spot in its 25th annual pest and disease ranking list.
The RHS stated that one of the most important things to remember about slugs is that they feed at night and leave slime trails and irregular holes in plant tissue, making you aware of their activity.

Slugs enjoy eating a wide range of vegetables and plants, including sweet peas, dahlias, gerberas, and tulips.

They also feed on garden peas, beans, lettuce, celery, and potato tubers.

To stop slugs from damaging your crops you can use a biological control specific to molluscs which has no adverse effect on other types of animals.

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This is available in the form of a microscopic nematode or eelworm that is watered into the soil.

The nematodes enter slugs’ bodies and infect them with bacteria that cause a fatal disease.

To water the nematodes into the soil, the soil must be moist and warm.

Nematodes are available from refrigerated cabinets in some garden centres, or by mail from suppliers of biological controls, according to the RHS.

Traps can also be used as a measure to get rid of slugs from your garden.

Traps can be made at home using a scooped out half orange, grapefruit, or melon skin, which can be laid with the cut side down on the grass or soil.

You can also use empty jam jars filled with a little beer and sink them into the soil near your plants.

The RHS advised checking and emptying these regularly, preferably every morning.

Many gardening experts and horticulturists have advised using the jam jar trick in the past, including Adam Pasco.

In a video for B&Q in 2015, Adam recommended sinking a jam jar filled with a little “bitter beer” in the soil to act as a slug trap.

He said: “What you’ll find is they’re attracted to the smell of the beer they will crawl along, go and have a nice drink and die happy drowned in the alcohol below.

“When you find some slugs in there, again, you can literally put the top on and just throw that away in the dustbin.

“Do also check each day because you can find that little beetles and some of the nice insects in the garden can crawl in there so just hook them out and save them.

“Otherwise, it’s a good way of controlling slugs naturally.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening expert shares jam jar hack to trap and kill ‘country’s number one pest’

Gardening expert Adam Pasco has shared his “natural” tips for removing slugs and snails from your garden. Adam explained how trap and kill the country’s “number one pest” using chemical-free methods and household items. The horticulturalist shared his advice in a video for B&Q in 2015.
“Keep birds away and creates a little mini cloche to help the plants grow more quickly and keeps the pests away too.”

Adam said another way to protect your plants is by cutting up your old compost bags.

You can cut them open and try lying them down onto the soil surface, lawns or borders.

The bags can be secured with stones if there’s windy weather.

He said: “Another thing you can do in your borders, around your delicate plants, on your veg plot, anywhere you like, just dig a hole, sink a jam jar or a plastic yoghurt pot or something into the ground so the rim of the pots is level with the soil surface and top that up with a good, bitter beer.

“This acts as a slug trap, what you’ll find is they’re attracted to the smell of the beer they will crawl along, go and have a nice drink and die happy drowned in the alcohol below.

“When you find some slugs in there, again, you can literally put the top on and just throw that away in the dustbin.

“Do also check each day because you can find that little beetles and some of the nice insects in the garden can crawl in there so just hook them out and save them.

“Otherwise, it’s a good way of controlling slugs naturally.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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Gardening expert shares best way to kill large quantities of perennial weeds

Perennial weeds can be a nuisance and are often very hard to control. Unlike annual weeds, perennials can live for several years with the roots often spreading underground. If you leave even the smallest piece of root in the soil when removing perennial weeds, you could end up with a whole new plant.
Removing them can be a tricky task, with gardeners often resorting to digging them out manually on their hands and knees.

But gardening expert Matt James has shared how to kill large quantities of perennial weeds using a weed killer.

He said in a 2012 video for B&Q that he doesn’t like to use weed killers but often in the “worst case” it’s the best thing to use.

However, if you just have a few weeds dotted about, it may be best to use a hoe.

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“Plants like bindweed or horsetail, identifiable by it’s sort of long bottle brush-like plume of foliage.

“You kind if need to knock them on their head quite hard before you start going in and growing your own.”

Matt said if you are only experiencing a couple of perennial weeds at a time then you can tackle them using a fork.

He said using a fork is a good idea because you can then get the roots out as well and it’s the roots that we need to take care of.

“It kills the roots and that is, as I say, what you want to kill.

“I don’t like using weed killers in a garden.

“I really don’t but if I’m faced with the worst cases of perennial thuggery then I will reach for a glyphosate-based weed killer.

“But once you’ve done it once or perhaps twice, if it’s particularly pernicious, you never need to use them again.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Life and Style Feed
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