Tag Archives: murder

Police comments on yesterday’s murder in Oslo: “The accused is very cooperative”

The man accused of having shot and killed another man on an open street in central Oslo will be questioned on Tuesday. He is very cooperative, the police say.

“He wanted to explain himself,” prosecuting lawyer Rita Parnas in the Oslo Police District told NTB.

On Monday afternoon, a man was shot and killed in an open street by the City Hall in Oslo. 

“The accused 41-year-old called the police himself and was quickly arrested. He is very cooperative,” Parnas explained.

On Tuesday at 3:30 PM, the man was still being questioned by the police, who do not yet have a full and complete picture of the course of events.

Source: © NTB Scanpix / #Norway Today / #NorwayTodayNews

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This post originally posted here Norway News

The man charged with the murder of 25-year-old Marianne Hansen in Oslo has died

The man accused of killing 25-year-old Marianne Hansen at Hellerud in Oslo on the night of June 8 this year is dead, the newspaper VG reports.

The 30-year-old man, a Romanian citizen, died at Ullevål hospital on Friday, police lawyer Børge Enoksen in the Oslo Police District told the newspaper.

He had been hospitalized there since last Monday after he had tried to take his own life in his cell in Oslo prison the same day.

The police have previously questioned the man several times. They will complete the criminal case investigation, but there will be no main hearing in court.

“The accused has given the police a detailed explanation of the course of events and the motive for the murder and the incident on E6,” Enoksen said.

The accused’s defense counsel, Cathrine Grøndahl, has so far not wished to comment on the case to VG.

Killed out of frustration

The accused has explained that he committed the murder on the night of June 8 out of frustration – as the woman did not want to continue the relationship. The murder took place inside the apartment where Hansen lived.

The man has pleaded guilty to the murder. On Wednesday, July 7, the Oslo District Court extended the man’s imprisonment for eight weeks.

The woman got to know the man through their workplaces in Oslo, and they began a relationship a few weeks before the murder on the night of June 8.

Traffic accident

The police found a dead woman in an apartment in Hellerud east of Oslo around 7 AM on Tuesday, June 8. The police searched the address after the man collided head-on with a van on the E6 in Eidsvoll at AM the same day.

The man was also charged with attempted murder by car after the frontal collision shortly after the murder. 

He allegedly drove in the wrong lane on the E6 for about 1.3 kilometers before he deliberately drove into the oncoming car in the 110 zones on the four-lane road north.

Source: © NTB Scanpix / #Norway Today / #NorwayTodayNews

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This post originally posted here Norway News

Sarah Everard trial: Ex-Met officer Wayne Couzens accused of murder to enter plea tomorrow

The suspect pleaded guilty in June to the kidnap and rape of Ms Everard. However, whilst his barrister said “responsibility for the killing is also admitted”, he has yet to answer the central charge of murder.

Ms Everard, a 33-year-old marketing executive, was abducted on March 3 whilst walking home from a friend’s home in Clapham.

She was reported missing the following day by her boyfriend.

Police found the victim’s body inside a large builder’s bag on March 10 in Ashford, Kent.

She was formally identified using her dental records.

Whilst an initial post mortem was inconclusive, later investigation determined she died from compression to the neck.

Ms Everard left her friend’s flat in the Clapham Junction area, on March 3, at around 9pm.

The journey to her home was approximately two-and-a-half miles.

CCTV cameras recorded the victim walking along the route prior to her abduction.

READ MORE: Westminster emergency – Man pinned down by police after punching officer near Parliament

Mr Couzens had worked for the Metropolitan Police’s Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Command.

This unit is tasked with protecting Parliament and foreign embassies across London.

His wife was initially arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender, but will face no further action.

Ms Everard’s death sparked outrage and protests over women’s safety across the UK.

On Saturday March 13 police broke-up a vigil on Clapham Common which contravened coronavirus regulations.

The Duchess of Cambridge attended the vigil to lay flowers.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick later said this was legal because “she was working”.

The future Queen also wrote a personal letter to Ms Everard’s family.

Speaking to the Daily Mirror an insider said: “This was a deeply personal and heartfelt letter, simply to express her absolute sadness at what Sarah’s family and loved ones are going through.

“The Duchess knows that no words can change what has happened, but wanted to let them know that they and Sarah are in her thoughts.”

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Author: James Bickerton
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: UK Feed

Murder suspect dies at Travis County jail, investigation underway into death

TRAVIS COUNTY, Texas (KXAN) — A suspect accused of murder died this weekend in the Travis County jail.

The Travis County Sheriff’s Office reported that staff members found Anthony Ryan Lilley, 31, unresponsive in his cell Saturday morning at the Travis County Correctional Complex. Deputies said employees started CPR and called EMS, who also responded but ultimately could not revive Lilley.

Police arrested Lilley on June 15 following a shooting that killed Travis Ray Clements in southeast Austin.

The sheriff’s office stated an investigation into the in-custody death is underway by the Internal Affairs Unit, the Criminal Investigations Division, the Texas Rangers and the Travis County Medical Examiner’s Office. An autopsy happened Sunday, and the sheriff’s office said the final report is pending toxicology results.

What happened on Todd Lane, according to police

According to the Austin Police Department, a woman called 911 on June 11, saying she had been robbed and shot. When officers arrived at 4123 Todd Lane, police found the woman and her husband, Clements, shot. Clements was unresponsive and was pronounced dead at the scene at 10:29 p.m., police say.

APD says the couple knew Lilley, and drove to the southeast Austin location with their three children to meet with the suspect. During the meeting, shots were fired hitting both victims. Lilley reportedly left the scene.

The children were taken to a family member by crisis counselors. The woman was taken by medics to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries, police say.

Author: Will DuPree
This post originally appeared on KXAN Austin

Pearland librarian's legacy lives on as husband pleads guilty to her murder

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — More than two years after a former Houston Police Sergeant shot and killed his wife, he’s plead guilty to murder and was sentenced to 40 years in prison.

It’s justice for a family still coping with unimaginable loss.

Belinda Hernandez was a school librarian, an educator, and a life-long learner.

In March 2019, her husband, Hilario Hernandez, who was an HPD sergeant for more than 30 years at the time, shot and killed her. He took off and was later arrested not far from the Texas-Mexico border, leaving the couple’s adult children to grieve.

READ ALSO: Husband shot wife over what he perceived was her flirting with another man, court documents say

Christina Foos is their daughter. On Friday, she faced her father, who she now calls Larry, in court.

As her father prepares to begin his sentence, Foos is following in her mother’s footsteps as an educator for Pearland ISD.

“It’s definitely been a long two years,” she said. “A devastating situation for my brother and myself. Essentially, that day, we lost both our parents. Mainly, what I made the focus about was her and her legacy. I made that known in the speech that it is no longer about him and it’s completely about her.”

READ ALSO: Pearland Little League’s decal honors school librarian

Foos is grateful this chapter is closed. Her mother’s memory is a constant reminder of how to live a good life.

“We miss her every day. She is just simply irreplaceable,” Foos said.

Belinda’s legacy lives on at two Pearland ISD campuses, one at which she was the librarian and another at which she taught reading.

There are free libraries filled with donated books, all dedicated in her memory.

Sonia Serrano first hired Belinda more than 20 years ago and mentored her as the mother of two went back to school to become a teacher. She then earned her master’s degree so she could become a librarian and share her love of reading.

READ ALSO: Family friend remembers slain Pearland ISD librarian and HPD sergeant accused in her death

“She had a passion for education,” Serrano said. “She was a life-long learner. She loved books. She loved providing instructions to students no matter what her role was. She took every opportunity available to teach kids life lessons. “

Michelle Kiefer, the principal at Shadycrest Elementary, said she misses Belinda’s spirit, but thinks of her when she walks into the library or when she sees the mural she painted or when she passes the little library built in her honor.

“We just couldn’t be more proud of Belinda Hernandez and the legacy she has created, not only for her kids and her family, but for Pearland ISD and the whole Pearland community,” said Kiefer.

In addition, those libraries mean everything to her children.

“We’re so honored and feel very blessed that she continues to live on in our community,” said Foos.

For the latest on this case, follow ABC13 reporter Tom Abrahams on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Copyright © 2021 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Author: Tom Abrahams

This post originally appeared on ABC13 RSS Feed

Georgetown husband facing murder charge after investigation into wife's disappearance

GEORGETOWN, Texas (KXAN) — A Georgetown man is facing a murder charge after an investigation into his wife’s disappearance this past February.

At last check, Travis Hall is being held in jail on a $ 1 million bond.

His wife, Julie Hall, reportedly disappeared Feb. 19. She was last seen at her apartment and didn’t report for work the following Monday. She was a Hutto Independent School District special education aide.

KXAN has reached out to the District Attorney’s Office to see if Hall’s murder charge is connected to Julie’s disappearance.

According to a previous arrest affidavit, Hall was caught lying about where she and he were and what he did in the days leading up to and after she was reportedly missing.

Hall lied about Julie’s whereabouts to his children and police, the affidavit says, saying she went to visit her sister the day she disappeared. Her sister told investigators there were no such plans and Julie didn’t visit her. He also told police he had gone to Houston on Feb. 20 for a plumbing job, but later admitted to police he had been unfaithful and used a debit card in Julie’s name while in Houston after having dinner with the woman he admitted to having an affair with, the affidavit says.

Hall said he deleted text messages from his phone that detailed the affair and used Julie’s phone to send text messages and lie about her status to other family members, according to the affidavit.

The Texas Rangers found a confession letter in the couple’s apartment days after Julie’s disappearance, which read, “I’m sorry! I killed your mother in her sleep.” The letter was signed, “Dad.”

That letter, which led to a search warrant, also led to the discovery of blood spatters in the bedroom and evidence of a cleaning agent used on the floor.

Hall’s previous charges included tampering with evidence.

Author: Chelsea Moreno
This post originally appeared on KXAN Austin

Houston Galleria crime: Woman accused of renting luxury cars used in violent robberies, murder

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Houston police have charged a Baytown woman in connection to several violent crimes that targeted people shopping and eating in the Galleria area.

Sarah Seay, 30, is charged with engaging in organized criminal activity. She is accused of conspiring to commit aggravated robbery. During one robbery, one man was killed.

“These are egregious allegations in this warrant,” a hearing officer told Seay, who is 7-months pregnant, in court Friday night.

Her bond was set at $ 50,000.

According to court documents, Seay used the Turo app to rent cars that two brothers – one of whom is the father of her children – used to rob people of hundreds of thousands of dollars in jewelry, cash and other items.

READ ALSO: League City yacht dealer killed after being followed home from dinner

Seay rented Cadillacs, an Audi and a Mercedes so that they would blend in when following victims home, according to investigators.

Court records tie those rentals to at least four armed robberies dating back to May 7 and one fatal shooting along Lester Street on May 27. Josh Sandoval, 28, was the victim.

“You’re speaking to a family that is in shock,” said Ashley Prince, Sandoval’s cousin.

His family gathered by video conference Friday night to talk about the loss and also what police call “jugging crimes” that have disrupted so many people’s lives.

READ ALSO: Suspects believed to have followed woman from Galleria Mall before taking $ 5,000 purse

“He wasn’t a stranger to no one. That was the type of person he was. He just enjoyed life,” said his mother, Glinda Martin.

His family gathered by video conference Friday night to talk about the loss and also what police call “jugging crimes” that have disrupted so many people’s lives. Houston police have been chipping away at the violent robbery crews with undercover operations and surveillance.

In Seay’s case, the detective reviewed rental agreements and vehicle tracking to learn that the cars that were used were at both her apartment and the victims’ locations, court records stated.

“This just a bigger part of what’s going on in Houston,” said Omar Sandoval, Josh’s brother. “So many deaths in Houston. It is ridiculous. My brother is a statistic.”

Investigators tell ABC13 they are focused on catching these violent robbers.

Seay is part of the puzzle and more people are expected to be charged.

“If these girls are helping these guys, they need to go to jail, just like they do,” said Queena Simmons, a family friend.

Josh’s family await a murder charge.

“I held his hand in the hospital and I told him we’re going to find justice,” his sister, Aimee Castillo said.

For the latest updates on this case, follow ABC13 reporter Jessica Willey on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Copyright © 2021 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Author: Jessica Willey

This post originally appeared on ABC13 RSS Feed

Derek Chauvin Receives 22 and a Half Years for Murder of George Floyd

MINNEAPOLIS — Derek Chauvin, the former police officer convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd, was sentenced on Friday to 22 and a half years in prison, bringing a measure of closure to a case that set off waves of protest across the nation over police abuse of Black people.

The sentence, delivered by Judge Peter A. Cahill of Hennepin County District Court, came more than a year after a widely shared cellphone video captured Mr. Chauvin pressing his knee on the neck of Mr. Floyd for more than nine minutes along a Minneapolis street. Earlier this year, Mr. Chauvin was convicted of second-degree murder, and the sentence followed emotional statements in court Friday by members of Mr. Floyd’s family as well as by Mr. Chauvin’s mother.

Mr. Chauvin, who spoke only briefly during the hearing on Friday, offering condolences to the Floyd family, has been behind bars since his trial, which ended in April. The judge said Mr. Chauvin would be credited with 199 days already served toward his sentence. Officials said he was being kept in solitary confinement for his own safety.

Before the sentencing hearing, Mr. Chauvin’s lawyer, Eric J. Nelson, had pressed the court for leniency, asking for probation and time served. Mr. Nelson wrote in a memorandum that Mr. Chauvin had not known that he was committing a crime when he tried to arrest Mr. Floyd on a report that he had tried to use a fake $ 20 bill to buy cigarettes. Mr. Nelson also argued that placing Mr. Chauvin in prison would make him a target of other inmates.

In seeking a 30-year prison sentence for Mr. Chauvin, prosecutors had argued that the former officer’s actions had “traumatized Mr. Floyd’s family, the bystanders who watched Mr. Floyd die, and the community. And his conduct shocked the nation’s conscience.”

The killing of Mr. Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, by Mr. Chauvin, 45, who is white, led to a national reckoning over racial injustice in almost every aspect of American life. Calls emerged around the country to defund police budgets, remove statues of historical figures tied to racism and diversify predominantly white corporate boards.

The maximum sentence allowed under Minnesota law for second-degree murder, the most serious charge Mr. Chauvin was convicted of, is 40 years. Under Minnesota’s sentencing guidelines, though, a presumptive sentence for someone like Mr. Chauvin with no criminal history is 12.5 years. The jury, which deliberated for just over 10 hours following a six week trial, also convicted Mr. Chauvin of third-degree murder and manslaughter.

In recent weeks, Judge Cahill had ruled that four so-called “aggravating factors” applied to the case, raising the prospect of a harsher sentence. The judge found that Mr. Chauvin acted with particular cruelty; acted with the participation of three other individuals, who were fellow officers; abused his position of authority; and committed his crime in the presence of children, who witnessed the killing on a Minneapolis street corner on May 25, 2020.

Mr. Chauvin’s conviction was a rare rebuke by the criminal justice system against a police officer who killed someone while on duty. Officers are often given wide latitude to use force, and juries have historically been reluctant to second guess them, especially when they make split-second decisions under dangerous circumstances.

Mr. Chauvin is one of 11 police officers who have been convicted of murder for on-duty killings since 2005, according to research conducted by Philip M. Stinson, a criminal justice professor at Bowling Green State University. The lightest sentence has been just less than seven years in prison, while the harshest was 40 years. The average sentence has been 21.7 years.

Mr. Chauvin’s sentencing on Friday, while a significant milestone, does not end the legal proceedings concerning Mr. Floyd’s death. Mr. Chauvin still faces criminal charges in federal court, where he is accused of violating Mr. Floyd’s constitutional rights. And three other police officers face a state trial, scheduled for March, on charges of aiding and abetting. Those officers, too, were indicted by a federal grand jury as well.

Author: Tim Arango
This post originally appeared on NYT > Top Stories