Tag Archives: OLED

Talking Point: Nintendo Switch OLED, Worth The Upgrade? Team NL Has A Chat

Switch OLED© Nintendo

A while back we shared a chat between a couple of Team NL’s members talking about the topic of “what is a game ‘developer'”? That was a nice little back and forth format in which we were chatting over a virtual cup of tea – or virtually but with actual cups of tea and coffee… you get the idea. We decided to revisit the format for a little chin-wag about the Nintendo Switch OLED Model, now that the dust has settled and many will have decided whether to bother chasing after pre-orders.

For this chat we have Gavin Lane, Kate Gray and Tom Whitehead talking semi-seriously about Nintendo’s latest Switch iteration. What do we think? Who will buy it? Does it look like a stormtrooper?

Let’s get right into it.

Gavin: I should preface everything I’m about to say with the fact that I’m the dude who bought four 3DSs. I am that idiot. I traded in my original Aqua and my subsequent red XL to upgrade, but have since gone back and got them again. I may have a problem. How many 3DSssss did you two buy?

Kate: Two, technically, but I swapped one in for the New Nintendo 3DS… XL… plus??? I have technically owned three Switches: One was an impulse buy (from NL Director Ant, four years ago); one was an impulse buy because it came with a ton of supermarket loyalty points (which I spent on a fancy toothbrush) but then I immediately felt guilty and sold it; the third is the one I got for work because the first one is Drift Central. I should not be allowed to have a credit card.

Tom: I had the original, which I then traded for an XL, then got the ‘ambassador’ little New 3DS that gives me hand cramps but has Xenoblade coverplates and coloured buttons, so the cramps are worth it.

Gavin: Okay, so varying degrees of idiocy… sorry, enthusiasm for Nintendo products, then! First up, after all the rumours and hype, what did you think when the ‘new’ console was finally revealed?

Switch OLED Tabletop© Nintendo

Tom: I’d actually expected an ‘XL’, because anything with new chipsets is a no-go this year for practical reasons, so I wasn’t ‘disappointed’ as a result. I just thought “oh dear, that won’t go down well”.

Kate: Mostly, I just thought, “oh no, everyone is going to be so angry.” And I was right about that, at least!

But personally, I just got a new Switch, so I’m good for the time being. Hopefully the base Switches miiiiight be cheaper now?

Gavin: I think the main barrier to price reduction on the ‘base’ model at the moment is that, from a business perspective, there’s zero reason for Nintendo to reduce the price — Switch is still selling huge numbers. The hardware itself is getting prettttttty long in the tooth, but there’s still huge demand so I don’t see a blanket reduction in the near future. Perhaps we’ll see some deeper discounts and bigger deals on the regular version come Black Friday and Holiday season, though.

I bought the ‘Slightly Better Battery’ Switch using the excuse that my mum could buy my old one off me to play Animal Crossing. Cheap, I’m not a monster.

My first thought seeing it was “ooo, sexy new dock”, actually.

Tom: Funny you noticed the dock, as the OLED is really all about handheld play. As someone who plays portable 90% of the time it’s hard not to consider a trade-in upgrade, but if you play on a TV there’s pretty much no point. It is a pretty dock though.

Gavin: I play maybe 75% docked… which makes the OLED Switch make even less sense for me! As established above, though, I‘ve got a problem. I bought the ‘Slightly Better Battery’ Switch using the excuse that my mum could buy my old one off me to play Animal Crossing. Cheap, I’m not a monster.

Kate: I’m also 90% portable, but as you might have read on my piece about burn-in… I’m a bit too afraid of burn-in. I know a bunch of people said it’s not a problem, but I don’t want to be anxious about it!

Tom: No Tik-Tok on Switch, you’ll be fine!

Gavin: I totally understand that anxiety. I’ve had an OLED TV for a few years now, and I’m pretty active when it comes to changing channels and running the in-built pixel shifter program. Feels like I’m having to nurse the tech at times. Worth it, though. I’m still amazed when it displays black and you can’t tell if the screen is on or not.

What are our feelings on the price?

Kate: I already forgot what the price was. $ 50 more? That seems reasonable to me; it’s a new model with a few minor but much-needed updates. I’m mostly relieved to see that grille at the top getting more fins, that was the bane of my life.

I have a theory that Nintendo was going to announce this during E3, as a minor upgrade that helps them keep up with Switch demand, and then they saw the hype, and just… completely backed out.

Tom: I think the price is fair for what should be a good screen upgrade (albeit, predictably, there’s ‘surprise’ that Nintendo is making a profit on each unit), as it’s a bit bigger, higher quality and combined with other small improvements. It’ll be interesting to see how sales go, especially if Nintendo does Black Friday deals and game bundle promotions with the original model. Maybe the OLED will be the ‘premium’ one that ultimately does less numbers because of that extra $ 50. I doubt Nintendo will phase out the original in any way, for example.

Kate: I have a theory that Nintendo was going to announce this during E3, as a minor upgrade that helps them keep up with Switch demand, and then they saw the hype, and just… completely backed out. I feel a bit bad for them, because there’s no way they could have lived up to it.

Tom: Yeah, that seems very possible. Especially when you see those white Joy-Cons, almost a very deliberate Metroid Dread tie-in that would have slotted into the finale of the Direct. But the internet speculation may have spoiled it.

Gavin: It’s a bit much when you see some people blaming poor performance in third-party games on Nintendo for not supplying the extra juice of a Switch ‘Pro’ which the devs were apparently ‘relying’ on!

Kate: I wonder if they’re now scrambling to make the Pro… 👀

Tom: The internet chatter won’t significantly affect hardware development and strategy, in my opinion. Sales of the system are still massive, so the ‘noise’ online is a small percentage of the real world market. There’ll likely be an upgrade in the next couple of years, because the Switch is getting old, but I strongly believe the online talk will have had little impact on the end-product, it’ll be more about what major partners want, what research says will succeed etc.

Switch OLED BOTW2© Nintendo

Gavin: Agreed. I don’t see Nintendo getting jittery or riled up by internet hopes and dreams, or reports that conflated this SKU with whatever else is in the works. Certainly not while huge bundles of cash continue to roll in from the current console, anyhow.

And that really is what Switch OLED is: the current console with a bit bigger screen. My first reaction on seeing the Neon Red/Blue Joy-Con version was “Who the heck is going to buy that version?”, forgetting that there are still loads of people who don’t own a Switch, people who may well pick one up over the next couple of years. Nobody I know, but millions of people.

Kate: I thought, “who on earth would buy a Fortnite console?” and the answer is me, for work. There’s always someone.

Tom: Those Joy-Con colours are nice, mind!

Kate: I’m not won over by the white, personally… on a console, it’s fine; on a HANDHELD, it’s gonna get greasy. I know people in the comments are always quite upset that I’m implying they are all filthy beings, but humans are greasy! It’s just natural! Of course, you can take good care of it, or wear gloves, but who knows what’ll happen. It might yellow in the sun (it probably won’t).

Tom: At least the console is still black, and when the Joy-Con sticks pack-in after eight months we’ll buy different coloured ones anyway…

Gavin: Ha, sad as it is, getting fresh Joy-Cons is one of the big attractions for me. I gave my Slightly Better Battery Switch ones to my mum with my old console (see, told you I’m not a monster!) For me, I kinda like how the white dock will sit nicely next to my TV and blend with the living room a bit better. I’m paranoid about my gaming stuff spilling out of the office and taking over the whole flat. I saw a pic with the white PS5 and the Xbox… *thinks* Series S! They made a nice trio. I don’t own either of those consoles yet, but I like the idea.

Kate: I wonder if the people who do custom paint jobs are happy about having a white Switch, which probably makes a much better canvas…

Tom: Weirdly it was the only thing that nearly put me off, as every other box and gadget in my living room is black. Then I figured the dock would look nice and stand out, like a rebellious throwback hitting us with exciting new things like an ethernet input.

Kate: It looks like a stormtrooper. That’s the opposite of rebellious!

Tom: Oh no, now you’re putting me off it again!

OLED - Stormtrooper Edition© Nintendo

Gavin: For a moment while watching the reveal trailer, I thought the Switch logo on the front lit up!

Tom: Pro feature confirmed!

Gavin: Okay then, the billion dollar question(s): Will you be getting one, and why?

Kate: Nah. If I still had my Original Launch Switch™, I would consider the minor upgrade; as it is, I’m good. I miiiight get the Joy-Cons if they sell them separately, because my drift on the Old Switch is so bad that I can’t play games at all. I tried to fix it, but it just changed the direction of the drift

Tom: Oof, that’s not good. I will be, but it only makes sense doing it with a trade-in to take the edge off the price. As I said earlier I play almost exclusively in handheld, in fact my dock was only used for the first time in ages when grabbing docked screenshots for a review. So with that in mind I have some favourite games I’d like to play on a better / bigger screen, plus Metroid Dread of course!

Gavin: Oooh, Dread… Well, having established my idiocy from the off, of course I’ll be getting one. For me, as a package that comes with new Joy-Cons, a sexy new screen and a second dock (which I’ve wanted for my office for years now), it offers just enough. For sure, Nintendo knows what it’s doing by injecting this marginally premium version into the market, and I’m certain I won’t be the only father eyeing the new SKU and using the kids as an excuse to splash out come October time. They can have the old one, I’ll upgrade!

My kids are a tad young and I’ve got a few 3DSs knocking around, but you know. Any excuse.


Those are some of our thoughts on the OLED, but where do you stand? Are you thinking of getting one? Do you think it’ll sell well? Does it look like a stormtrooper? Let us know in the comments.

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This post originally posted here Nintendo Life | Latest News

Nintendo Switch OLED pre-orders now live at Amazon UK today

The Switch Pro also comes with a new dock which has a wired LAN port, if you’d rather connect your console online that way.

It has long been rumoured that Nintendo would be releasing a mid-generation upgrade for the Switch, which previously was rumoured to be called the Switch Pro.

It was believed the Switch Pro would have a beefier graphics chip and would support 4K gaming in docked mode.

However, the Switch OLED doesn’t have these features – with the console not shipping with more RAM or a new CPU compared to other models in the Switch family.

It remains to be seen if another version of the Switch further down the line could boast these features or not.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express

Nintendo Switch Oled pre order starts today: Latest Gamestop, Best Buy, GAME news

The Nintendo Switch Oled model is coming out later this year, and gamers can start pre-ordering now.

However, like with other big product launches in 2020 and this year, gamers are struggling to find an option to buy one.

The good news is that Nintendo Switch Oled pre-order options have started today in North America and have already begun in the UK.

Argos has an active page offering the Nintendo Switch Oled console that appears to allow you to add it to your trolley.

So that might be the first place to try when trying to buy in the UK this month and later in 2021.

The official GAME UK page states that console hunters can sign up to get updates regarding availability, adding:

“We’re currently out of stock of the Nintendo Oled Model. Enter your email address below to sign up to receive email updates when stock becomes available again.”

But like those customers who have been trying to buy Xbox Series X and PS5 consoles in 2021, it looks like this new Nintendo product is going to sell out quickly.

Gamestop revealed on Twitter today that they would begin selling Switch Oled consoles today as part of the pre-order process.

And if you check the site right now, it states that the $ 349.99 console is currently not available to pre-order.

The only consolation is that gamers could receive updates regarding when the new Nintendo Switch console is available to buy via Twitter messages and official sign-ups.

The Switch OLED Model features a host of improvements over the original model, such as a wider adjustable stand for tabletop mode and a LAN port for improved online performance.

With 64BG of internal storage, the Nintendo Switch OLED Model can hold more games – although you’ll probably still need an SD card if you download lots of games.

Finally, Nintendo has confirmed that the Nintendo Switch OLED Model will feature improved audio thanks to the beefier speakers.

Elsewhere, the stylish new console will launch with a brand new colour scheme, as well as the classic Neon Red and Neon Blue set-up.

Fans will be able to purchase a white model, complete with white Joy-Con controllers, a black main unit and a white dock.

Unlike the Switch Lite, the OLED Model will support both handheld and docked gameplay, meaning it can be played at home on the TV, and on the go.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: Gaming

Nintendo Switch OLED in stock at Argos: Pre-order now to avoid PS5-style disappointment

Nintendo Switch OLED Model is shaping up to be one of the must-have devices of 2021.

The newly announced OLED Model features an improved display, as well as additional storage and a superior stand.

Fans can purchase the OLED Model alongside Metroid Dread on October 8.

However, if the launch of the PS5 and Xbox Series X/S has taught us anything, it’s that pre-ordering is essential.

With Christmas following shortly after the launch of the OLED Model, demand is sure to be high for the new Nintendo release.

Unfortunately for fans in the UK, Nintendo Switch OLED pre-orders aren’t widely available.

Argos is one of the few retailers to let customers pre-order the device at the time of writing. You can purchase the OLED Model from Argos for £309.99. Click the link below to pre-order now.

Elsewhere, fans can’t actually pre-order the console, but can register an interest ahead of launch.

This includes GAME, where customers can enter their email address in order to be informed when it will be back in stock.

“REGISTER YOUR INTEREST FOR NINTENDO SWITCH OLED MODEL,” reads a post on the GAME website.

“We’re currently out of stock of the Nintendo Oled Model. Enter your email address below to sign up to receive email updates when stock becomes available again.”

The Nintendo Store is also selling the OLED Model for £309.99, although once again, you’ll have to enter your email address to register interest.

Finally, Amazon has a page for the OLED Model, but no ability to actually pre-order the device.

The Switch OLED Model features a host of improvements over the original model, such as a wider adjustable stand for tabletop mode and a LAN port for improved online performance.

With 64BG of internal storage, the Nintendo Switch OLED Model can hold more games – although you’ll probably still need an SD card if you download lots of games.

Finally, Nintendo has confirmed that the Nintendo Switch OLED Model will feature improved audio thanks to the beefier speakers.

Elsewhere, the stylish new console will launch with a brand new colour scheme, as well as the classic Neon Red and Neon Blue set-up.

Fans will be able to purchase a white model, complete with white Joy-Con controllers, a black main unit and a white dock.

Unlike the Switch Lite, the OLED Model will support both handheld and docked gameplay, meaning it can be played at home on the TV, and on the go.

Nintendo Switch OLED Model: Major design flaw is bad news for shoot ’em up fans

After months of speculation, Nintendo announced the new and improved Switch OLED Model earlier this week.

The new Nintendo Switch OLED Model will launch alongside Metroid Dread on October 8.

The headline new feature is the OLED display, which features more vibrant colours, as well as a higher contrast compared to the current Switch and Switch Lite. 

While the console is similar in size to the current model, fans will benefit from a larger 7-inch display.

Unfortunately, however, it’s not all good news, especially if you’re a fan of shoot ’em ups.

The Nintendo Switch has a vast library of new and classic arcade shooters, including recently released CAVE shmup Mushihimesama.

Thanks to a device known as the Flip Grip, fans can play supported shooters in vertical-mode, just like the arcades.

Sadly, according to Flip Grip creator Mike Choi, the device doesn’t appear to be compatible with the Switch OLED Model.

“PSA: I’ve seen a lot of people asking if the new OLED Switch is Flip Grip compatible,” Choi tweeted.

“Due to the lack of the back cents the Flip Grip registers against, the OLED model is NOT compatible, at least from my initial observation.”

On the plus side, the Switch OLED Model features other improvements, such as a wider adjustable stand for tabletop mode and a LAN port for improved online performance.

With 64BG of internal storage, the Nintendo Switch OLED Model can hold more games – although you’ll probably still need an SD card if you download lots of games.

Finally, Nintendo has confirmed that the Nintendo Switch OLED Model will feature improved audio thanks to the beefier speakers.

Elsewhere, the stylish new console will launch with a brand new colour scheme, as well as the classic Neon Red and Neon Blue set-up.

Fans will be able to purchase a white model, complete with white Joy-Con controllers, a black main unit and a white dock.

Judging by the recent launches of the PS5 and Xbox Series X, it’s worth getting in early if you want to secure a console at launch.

Unlike the Switch Lite, the OLED Model will support both handheld and docked gameplay, meaning it can be played at home on the TV, and on the go.

Talking Point: Should We Be Worried About Screen Burn-In With Switch OLED?

Switch OLED BOTW2

It’s time for an embarrassing admission: I apparently use TikTok so much that the app’s UI has burned into my phone screen.

But let me just redeem myself a little: I don’t have the kind of For You Page (that’s TikTok’s algorithmically-generated stream of content) that’s full of viral dances and teen boys being kinda creepy, although I do enjoy the dances from time to time — I’ve managed to train the algorithm to show me mostly really good food, extremely absurd musical comedy, old house renovations, and Jacob Collier.

But my point is not that I’m very cool, actually, please like me — it’s that my phone has burn-in, something that can happen on OLED screens.

So, what’s the problem exactly?

Burn-in can occur with various types of displays if they are made to show the same static image for long enough. It happens to phones, TVs, and generally anything with a screen. It’s not just TikTok, either — the icons displaying battery, wifi, volume, and the fact that my phone is always set to vibrate are all there too, ghost-like apparitions on the top-right of my screen. On the left, there’s a quite-creepy amalgam of every single time that I’ve looked at my phone, represented by a permanent spectral clock, plus an irritating reminder that I have way too many unread emails and messages, because there’s all these notification-shapes up there too.

An example of screen burn-in on an amber CRT monitor
An example of screen burn-in on an amber CRT monitor (Image: Piercetheorganist, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

I have a Google Pixel 2XL, by the way, which — according to Wikipedia — has a P-OLED screen (the P, in case it’s important to you, stands for “polymer”). Reports of screen burn-in on these phones were recorded as early as 2017, just months after it was released. Similarly, with the PlayStation Vita, many owners reported burn-in, especially if they left the screen on for long periods of time (i.e. while playing games, or leaving the console on pause).

So, of course, when the Nintendo Switch (OLED Model) was revealed to be largely the same as the old Switch, but with — you guessed it — an OLED screen, concern over burn-in began to spread.

As highlighted in CNET’s piece about burn-in on TVs, manufacturers — from Apple to Google to LG — are aware of the curse of burn-in, and seem to respond largely by telling their customers how to avoid it, making fun of the companies that tell customers how to avoid it, or just flat-out denying that their TVs have the burn-in problem, despite evidence to the contrary.

One trend emerges: if you have screen burn-in, these companies say, it’s your fault — for watching videos with static UI, or playing video games for too long. Just stop doing those things, and you won’t have burn-in. I’m sorry, you want me to avoid video games with static UI? That’s all of them. That’s all the video games.

An example of burn-in on an airport screen (airports are a great place to see it)
An example of burn-in on an airport screen (airports are a great place to see it) (Image: Gustav Broennimann, CC BY 3.0 CH, via Wikimedia Commons)

Now, manufacturers have started anticipating OLED from their side, rather than denying its existence. Apple’s new iPhones have “special algorithms that monitor the usage of individual pixels to produce display calibration data,” which is to say that it self-adjusts brightness to stop burn-in, although they say that burn-in is just an “expected behaviour” with OLED screens. It’s a risk-reward thing, but you can mitigate the risk, at least.

Consoles, like the Xbox, try to reduce burn-in on their side by having things fade to a “dim” setting after a while. The current Switch has a “Screen Burn-In Reduction” mode too, which does a similar thing after five minutes of inactivity. These settings protect the user’s TV from getting burn-in, even though that’s not really the responsibility of the console manufacturers. Nice!

What does Nintendo say about burn-in on Switch OLED?

Screenshot 2021 07 06 At 2.36.11 Pm

But the question is not “will the Switch leave burn-in on my OLED TV” but “will the Switch leave burn-in on itself”. The new OLED screen is part of the console, and is clearly designed for better-looking handheld play. As someone who largely plays Switch in handheld mode, I want to know: Is it going to have perma-health bars and mini-maps seared into the screen?

Well, CNET isn’t worried about burn-in on the Switch’s OLED screen, at least. Here’s the statement that Nintendo gave them:

“We’ve designed the OLED screen to aim for longevity as much as possible, but OLED displays can experience image retention if subjected to static visuals over a long period of time.

However, users can take preventative measures to preserve the screen [by] utilizing features included in the Nintendo Switch systems by default, such as auto-brightness function to prevent the screen from getting too bright, and the auto-sleep function to go into ‘auto sleep’ mode after short periods of time.”

To summarise: they’re not denying that burn-in is a problem, and their statement seems to imply that, yes, eventually, it might happen — but you can prevent (or postpone) the issue with careful usage of brightness levels and auto-sleep.

So, should I be worried about burn-in with the Switch OLED?

CNET themselves list a few things that have assuaged their fears about burn-in: first, different games have different static features, so unless you’re playing the same game for hours, the OLED Switch will be fine. Plus, unlike phones, the Switch doesn’t have an always-on menu element like battery or a clock, and it does have that automatic sleep mode that we mentioned.

But, of course, there are gamers that play the same games for hours at a time — games like Fortnite, Minecraft, or Tetris 99. Obviously, those players will be at a way higher risk of screen burn-in, and even Nintendo isn’t denying that.

It should be said that OLED technology has advanced since the Vita days, as have built-in solutions and measures to mitigate the problem and improve the life of any screen you buy that’s likely to get prolonged and daily use. That doesn’t mean burn-in couldn’t happen on your Switch OLED screen, but Nintendo will have anticipated the issue. We can’t be certain until we spend significant time with the console — and goodness knows Nintendo doesn’t have a perfect track record when it comes to hardware — but unless you go out of your way to induce burn-in by turning off the auto-brightness sensor and only ever playing for hours every day at 100% brightness, our gut feeling is that you’ll probably be fine.

CNET puts it pretty succinctly, though: if you believe burn-in is likely, “don’t buy the new Switch”.

Imagine having Buizel permanently on your screen
Imagine having Buizel permanently on your screen

You are, in general, less likely to get burn-in on a console, even with the caveat that hours on one game could cause it to happen. My phone issue only started happening three years into my possession of it, and that’s because I’m a trashbag who watches too many TikToks. My real punishment will be the roasting I get in the comments, no doubt. As for TVs, the problem becomes more likely when you have something like a news channel on a lot of the time, like TVs in receptions and waiting rooms.

We can’t say for sure whether or not the OLED screen will have significant burn-in issues, because we aren’t psychic, but the safest answer for now is that it’s possible, under specific conditions. As pointed out by this Best Buy employee on Reddit, and by CNET, and by Nintendo themselves, there are precautions we can take to reduce the chance of it happening: don’t leave the screen on full brightness for hours, especially not on a menu screen, and set the console to dim or auto-sleep after a few minutes of inaction.

Plus, there’s always the option of not buying the new OLED Switch at all if you’d mostly be using it for really long Overwatch marathons in handheld mode. For some, the risk can be balanced against the reward of darker blacks, higher contrast, and brighter colours; for others, it’s best to just stick to the trustworthy ol’ LCD screen.

Talking Point: Where Does The Switch OLED Announcement Leave The Rumoured Switch Pro?

Switch OLED© Nintendo

This week, Nintendo did its usual thing of shadow-dropping a major announcement on a (largely) unsuspecting world, and now the dust has settled on the reveal of the Switch OLED Model, it’s time to ask the vital question: where does that leave the much-rumoured Switch Pro?

In case you somehow missed it, the Switch OLED Model offers a larger 7-inch screen with superior brightness and deeper, more convincing contrast. Nintendo has also included improved speakers, a Microsoft Surface-style kickstand and a LAN port on the redesigned dock – all in a machine that retails for $ 350. However, there’s no boost to the console’s power when compared to the original Switch and Switch Lite – and the battery capacity is the same as the original Switch model (to be specific, the improved 2019 iteration), too.

Some of the reports tied to what was believed to be the Switch Pro have been validated by the announcement of the Switch OLED Model. For example, it was reported back in March 2021 that Samsung was mass-producing a 7-inch, 720p OLED panel for the Switch, with the aim to manufacture just under a million units per month and ship the first batch of panels to assemblers by July. This ties in perfectly with the Switch OLED Model’s release in October, so the rumours were on the money there – it’s just that many people expected the panel to be included in a 4K-ready console (when docked) – and Bloomberg’s sources suggested as much. Even Universal Display Corp – the company from which Samsung (and many other firms) licence OLED tech – mentioned Switch Pro reports during its Q1 investors call.

Another rumour was related to the aforementioned kickstand, and that was correct – as was the inclusion of a LAN port on the dock itself. However, the 7-inch OLED panel was also mentioned in this report, which is another indication that some of these sources simply confused the OLED Model for the mythical Switch Pro.

Switch OLED© Nintendo

If that’s the case – and many people do seem to be satisfied with that explanation – then why were there so many reports (from respected publications like The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, lest we forget) indicating that a more powerful Switch variant was in the offing? Why were there reports that 4K output would be included, and why did so many people expect a more powerful system?

This is the company that pumped out six different versions of the 3DS, lest we forget; it’s something of a no-brainer to predict another, more powerful model is coming at some point

Rumours that the Switch was getting improved internal hardware have been floating around for ages, and while sources like Bloomberg have claimed on multiple occasions to have spoken to people ‘familiar with the matter’, it’s tempted to suggesting that some ‘joining of dots’ has taken place here. In March of this year, Nvidia announced that it was ceasing production of the chip which powers the Switch, which fed into earlier rumours that the console would benefit from a better SoC at some point in the near future – that became the Tegra X1 ‘Mariko’, which eventually found its way into the 2019 revision of the Switch and the Switch Lite, but other reports suggested that a totally new chipset was also on the way.

Taking a look at all of the rumours and reports we’ve seen over the past few years – and taking into account the arrival of the Switch OLED Model – it’s easy to see why so many people have turned on those who reported on the rumoured Switch Pro. However, as anyone involved in consumer electronics will tell you, hardware development isn’t something that happens in fits and starts, and Nintendo – like any other video game hardware maker – will be working on new concepts and variants all the time.

This, of course, leads us to a ‘stopped clock is always right twice a day’ situation; those who claim the reports are true will, eventually, be validated because of course Nintendo is working on a new Switch variant. This is the company that pumped out six different versions of the 3DS, lest we forget; it’s something of a no-brainer to predict another, more powerful model is coming at some point.

However, there are those who are claiming they’ve heard the Pro model is still in the works, and is expected in 2022:

The most frustrating thing about all of this from a fan perspective is that everybody might be right when it comes to Switch Pro. We know Nintendo likes to iterate on its portable hardware quite soon after the initial release (let’s not forget that the GBA SP arrived less than two years after the release of the original model, while the DS Lite arrived on the scene 15 months after the 2004 launch of the ‘phat’ version) and it’s not beyond the realm of possibility that a Pro model was intended to arrive much sooner than planned.

With COVID-19 gripping the world from the start of 2020 onwards and the incredible (perhaps unexpected?) sales momentum of Switch, it could simply be that Nintendo altered its plans in response to real-world conditions. This is not a unique thing and happens all of the time in the world of consumer electronics – and it’s perfectly possible that one of the ‘sources close to the matter’ who spoke to the likes of Bloomberg and WSJ was simply relaying the state of affairs within Nintendo’s production chain at that particular moment in time.

Also, just because the 7-inch OLED screen, improved kickstand and LAN-ready dock are all parts of the OLED Model, that doesn’t mean those same elements won’t be part of the Switch Pro, too. In fact, it wouldn’t make any sense for Nintendo to revert back to a smaller LCD panel for future Switch SKUs, so you could argue that by releasing a revised base model now, Nintendo is laying down the tracks for a more robust upgrade in the near future.

Switch OLED© Nintendo

It’s also worth pointing out that as plans change, the goalposts are shifting, too. The Switch will be five years old in 2022, and although Nintendo has predicted a long lifespan for the system, it will be long overdue for an upgrade by that point (some might even argue it was overdue a long time ago). Perhaps the ‘Switch Pro’ will simply morph into the Switch 2, a complete successor to the original Switch which is less of an incremental update and more a totally overhauled platform.

That’s assuming, of course, that Nintendo goes against tradition and sticks with the Switch concept instead of doing what it is so often accustomed to doing, which is attempting to shift the paradigm with a totally new approach, just as it did with the DS, Wii, Wii U and Switch. There’s always the chance that Nintendo could drop the hybrid concept and release something entirely fresh, but one would hope that the failure of the Wii U and the fact that Nintendo has carved out a profitable niche which it has entirely to itself would dissuade such action.

Whatever happens, it will be interesting to see if the rumours and reports persist now that the OLED Model has broken cover.

Do you think the Switch Pro is still a thing? Let us know by voting in the poll below and posting your thoughts.

Author:
Read more here >>> Nintendo Life | Latest News

Guide: Should I Buy A Switch OLED? Which Nintendo Switch Is Best For Me?

Switch OLED Joy Con

Nintendo has finally announced its newest hardware revision of the Switch console: the Switch OLED Model. The original Switch launched in March 2017, and if you’re a Nintendo fan it’s highly likely that you already own a Nintendo Switch or Switch Lite, which begs the question: Should I upgrade to Switch OLED?

In this guide, we offer advice to help you decide whether to buy the new Switch or stick with the one you’ve got.

Switch OLED Buyer’s Advice – Should I buy the Nintendo Switch OLED Model?

If you’re looking for an in-depth comparison between each Switch model, check out our Nintendo Switch OLED vs. standard Switch tech specs comparison for more technical information — here we’re going to offer advice as to whether you should upgrade according to your specific circumstances rather than pure numbers.

Below we’ve listed several cases and offer our advice accordingly based on the personal experience.

Is Switch OLED a worthwhile upgrade from the standard Switch?

Switch OLED BOTW2

In short, yes, but only if you’re interested in a slightly bigger, significantly better screen.

As writers for a site called Nintendo Life, we’re always interested in any new Nintendo hardware, but whether you should spend your hard-earned cash on the Switch OLED model will hinge on the attraction of its improved screen. Besides the OLED screen itself (and associated components), Nintendo has confirmed that the tech inside the console is identical to the standard model — as are the Joy-Con controllers. Switch OLED won’t offer any performance improvements over the base model, then.

Of course, other factors such as your circumstances and budget will come into play when deciding if the new console is right for you, but if you have no interest in the OLED screen, you don’t need a Switch OLED in your life right now and you can stop reading here.

Still here? Lovely! We’re going to look at some specific use cases to help you decide if Switch OLED is right for you, but first here’s a quick round up of the improvements the Switch OLED offers over the base console…

Switch OLED Improvements overview

Here are the essential improvements the new console offers over the standard Nintendo Switch:

  • A bigger, better screen
  • A bigger, better kickstand
  • ‘Enhanced audio’, so ‘bigger, better’ sound in handheld mode, presumably
  • 64GB of internal storage (double the standard Switch’s 32GB)
  • A new dock with an in-built LAN port for an ethernet cable (better than a wireless connection for online gaming)

In general, if you spend (or are likely to spend) a significant amount of your time playing your Switch in handheld or tabletop mode, the 7-inch screen of the Switch OLED Model is definitely worth considering over the standard Switch’s 6.2-inch screen.

The article above goes into more details, but the long and short of it is that the new screen offers brighter and more accurate colours, richer and deeper black levels, and a more vibrant and vivid picture overall.

There’s no question over which console has the better screen — the question is if it’s worth forking out for, especially if you already own the base model.

Switch OLED Splatoon 3

Hopefully, you’ll find some answers below that will help you make an informed decision.

Should I buy a Switch OLED Model? – Use Cases

I don’t own a Switch at all — should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: If you’ve managed to resist the temptations of Nintendo’s handheld hybrid console until now, there’s never been a better time to jump onboard. With a huge and growing library of brilliant games, and the convenience of being both a home and handheld console, it’s one of the best products that Nintendo has ever produced.

There’s a reason it’s been so successful since launching in 2017, so we’d thoroughly recommend getting involved with Switch, and specifically the new OLED version. The price difference between the standard and OLED models is small enough to make it worth splashing a little extra on the new model, in our opinion.

Short answer: There’s never been a better time to buy a Switch, or a better Switch to buy. If you’re at all interest, we’d say go for it. Of course we would — you’re on a site called Nintendo Life, remember?

I bought a Switch in 2017 — should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: We’re well over four years into the Switch’s life and if you bought a launch model, the chances are it’s looking a bit dog-eared these days. As a hybrid console, your Switch will have likely endured bumps and drops over the years when you’ve taken it out and about — it happens to the best of us.

If you’ve thus far resisted the temptation to get the newer standard model (with the better battery life) or the handheld-only Switch Lite, we’d probably recommend you upgrade to the Switch OLED. We can’t promise that Nintendo doesn’t have the fabled Switch ‘Pro’ waiting in the wings to launch alongside Zelda: Breath of the Wild 2 in 2022 (or 2023), but going from a tired old launch Switch to a brand-spanking-new Switch OLED will feel like a substantial upgrade.

Short answer: Yes, we definitely would.

Switch OLED Model Screen

I own a Switch Lite — should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: This really depends on how you feel about your Switch Lite. While the Lite’s screen isn’t as vivid as the upcoming OLED variant, its smaller dimensions (5.5 inches versus 7 inches) means that pixel density is increased and the image will naturally look ‘sharper’ — remember, the resolution of both screens is identical: 1280 x 720.

Personally, as much as the Switch Lite is a smart little device, we love having the option to dock the Switch to a TV; it’s the console’s central gimmick and part of the reason for its success. The bigger brighter screen of the Switch OLED model is going to look cracking in handheld mode, so if you’re after the best (if not the most portable) handheld experience, you should check out the new console.

However, if you’re happy with the smaller size and screen on your Switch Lite, you’re not interested in playing on TV, you’re probably best off sticking with what you’ve got.

Short answer: Depends. If you play handheld exclusively and like the smaller dimensions of the Lite, stick with it. If you’re at all interested in the extra bells and whistles offered by the Switch OLED, we’d say it’s worth investigating.

Switch OLED Metroid Dread

I own the Switch with the better battery life — should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: Ah, we feel your pain. We, too, were unable to resist the siren call of new hardware and ‘upgraded’ from our launch model Switch to the marginally improved ‘silent’ revision that offered improved battery life.

Nintendo has confirmed that the new OLED model has no internal upgrades or differences other than the screen — same chips, same battery, same everything. The screen is the only real improvement in terms of your gameplay experience; you’re not getting any performance boosts here.

Ultimately, if you’re not absolutely desperate to see the new screen, you’re probably best off staying with what you’ve got and waiting for the next console. If you’re a Switch gamer who plays predominantly on the TV, the choice is even easier — stick with the standard model.

Short answer: If you’re not bothered about the more vibrant, slightly bigger screen, we’d probably sit tight until the next inevitable Switch hardware revision.

Switch OLED Mario Kart 8

I recently bought a standard Switch — should I get a Switch OLED?

Long answer: If you’ve bought a new Switch in the last couple of months, we’d probably recommend keeping it. The games coming for the new system are totally compatible, so unless money is no object, you’ll likely be very happy with the current model.

Short answer: No, the standard Switch is still a great system, so stick with it if you’ve just got one and the bigger screen isn’t making you sick with envy.

I only play in docked mode on my TV – should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: As we detailed further up the page, the new Switch model offers no improvements whatsoever when it comes to docked play. If that lovely OLED screen is going to spend its life nestled in that (admittedly lovely-looking) dock, there’s really not much point in upgrading.

The new dock does have an in-built LAN port for connecting an ethernet cable directly to the dock (rather than having to use an adapter). Now, we’re not going to recommend you buy an entire new console just for that — and Nintendo will be selling the dock separately anyway, if you buy direct — but if you play with a wired internet connection, the new dock will make things a tiny bit tidier around your telly.

Short answer: Nope. And if you can’t live without the in-built LAN port, buy the new dock separately.

Switch OLED TV Family

I only play in handheld mode – should I buy a Switch OLED?

Long answer: Well, assuming you haven’t already got a Switch Lite, we’d definitely go for the OLED model over the standard Switch if you’re a portable gamer. For us, the increased size over the Lite variant is actually a positive due to our large(r) hands, but the screen is the real reason we’d take the newer model over any other if it’s primary function is as a portable system.

Short answer: We would, but if smaller is better in your books (or in your hands or bags), you might want to check out the smaller, cheaper, handheld-only Switch Lite.

I’m an older gamer — should I buy the Switch OLED?

Long answer: For the more seasoned player, it’s even more important to take care of yourself while gaming, whether that means using a more comfortable grip in handheld mode, or playing on the biggest screen available to avoid squinting at tiny text. The screen on the Switch OLED could well be a great help for anyone whose eyesight isn’t what it used to be, not only in terms of its larger size, but also its vivid image.

Then again, if you only every play docked, you won’t see any benefit whatsoever from the new Switch, beyond having a slightly prettier dock next to your telly.

Short answer: If you play in handheld mode and struggle to read text, the increased size and image quality of the Switch OLED will likely improve your playing experience. If you only play on the TV, though, there’ll be no difference between the new console and your current one — stick with what you’ve got.

Money is no object — should I buy the Switch OLED model?

Long answer:

Short answer: Why are you even reading this guide if money’s no problem? Yes, of course you should be the latest and greatest version of the Switch! Off to the Switch OLED pre-order page with you.

Switch OLED by the pool

If you’re looking for detailed information on Switch OLED model tech specs, check out our Switch OLED vs. Standard Switch vs. Switch Lite spec comparison guide. You can also find some lovely pics of the new model in our Switch OLED gallery. Let us know below if you’ve got any questions about the screen i the new Switch and we’ll endeavour to answer them above.

Author:
Read more here >>> Nintendo Life | Latest News

Nintendo’s Switch OLED Dock Can Be Purchased Separately

Nintendo Switch OLED Dock© Nintendo

There are a lot of fine details we’re still learning about the newly announced Switch OLED model. While we’ve already discussed the dock in a number of other posts, it seems we’ve found a little bit of extra information that’s worth sharing.

Just like the original Nintendo Switch dock, users will be able to buy this new one as a standalone product. That’s right – if you really want this snazzy-looking new dock which is available in black or white, you won’t have to fork out for the rest of the system. Keep in mind it won’t include an HDMI cable, AC adaptor or packaging, and it won’t be sold at retail – so you’ll have to head over to Nintendo’s online store. Nintendo confirmed this to the website Digital Trends:

“The white dock and black dock will be sold separately (no HDMI cable, no AC adaptor, not in a package) on the Nintendo online store. It will not be sold at retail.”

There’s no mention of pricing just yet for a standalone dock purchase, but if we hear anything we’ll let you know. The main advantage of the OLED Model is that it comes with a built-in LAN port, so you can enjoy low-latency wireless gaming. The downside is, there’s one less USB port on it.

We’ve also just found out from a Nintendo FAQ that the new dock that comes with the OLED Switch will be compatible with the old (regular-sized) Switch model, and your new Switch can be used in the original dock. Got that?

Would you consider purchasing this new dock? Leave a comment down below.

Author:
Read more here >>> Nintendo Life | Latest News

Nintendo Switch PRO is official: OLED model release date revealed and pre-order NEWS

The new and improved Nintendo Switch Pro has been officially announced by Nintendo.

The surprise announcement comes after months of rumours and speculation about powerful new Switch hardware.

The Nintendo Switch OLED Model has been given an October 8 release date, which means it will launch alongside Metroid Dread.

As the name suggests, the headline new feature is the OLED display, which will offer a more vibrant experience.

While the console itself will be similar in size to the existing model, the screen will measure in at 7-inches.

According to Nintendo, it will feature more vibrant colours and a higher contrast compared to the current Switch and Switch Lite. 

Other improvements include a wider adjustable stand for tabletop mode, as well as a LAN port for improved online performance.

With 64BG of internal storage, the Nintendo Switch OLED Model can hold more games – although you’ll probably still need an SD card if you download lots of games.

Finally, Nintendo has confirmed that the Nintendo Switch OLED Model will feature improved audio thanks to the beefier speakers.

Elsewhere, the stylish new console will launch with a brand new colour scheme, as well as the classic Neon Red and Neon Blue set-up.

Fans will be able to purchase a white model, complete with white Joy-Con controllers, a black main unit and a white dock.

At the time of writing, pre-orders are yet to go live, and Nintendo hasn’t announced the price of the console.

Express Online has contacted the company for confirmation about the price and pre-order dates.

Judging by the recent launches of the PS5 and Xbox Series X, it’s worth getting in early if you want to secure a console at launch.

Unlike the Switch Lite, the OLED Model will support both handheld and docked gameplay, meaning it can be played at home on the TV, and on the go.

“Nintendo Switch (OLED model) will let users experience enhancements in all three play modes,” Nintendo explains.

“TV mode: Place the Nintendo Switch (OLED model) console into the dock to play Nintendo Switch games on the TV. By using the built-in wired LAN port, users can enjoy another way to connect online in TV mode.

“Tabletop mode: Flip the stand on the back of the console and use the console’s screen to play multiplayer games using the two included Joy-Con controllers right out of the box. The wide adjustable stand makes for a solid and sturdy foundation. It also allows players to freely tilt the console with more range on the viewing angle, so it’s easier to see the screen.

“Handheld mode: Users can bring the console wherever they go in handheld mode and play local* or online** multiplayer with friends. The 7-inch OLED screen provides vivid colour and high contrast.”

MORE TO FOLLOW…

Author: Liam Martin
Read more here >>> Daily Express