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At least 3 people were wounded in a shooting outside Nationals Park

A fan outside of the stadium was one of three people wounded, according to Ashan Benedict, executive assistant chief of police for DC’s Metropolitan Police Department.
CNN journalists inside the stadium reported hearing multiple loud bangs during the bottom of the 6th inning in a game between the Washington Nationals and San Diego Padres.
Fans fled their seats and sought shelter after hearing the gunfire. Benedict said there ultimately was no threat to people inside the stadium.
“I just want to assure the public that at no time during this incident were individuals inside the stadium attending the game in any kind of danger. This was not an active shooter incident and it’s not being investigated as such. Everything took place outside the stadium,” he said.
Fans leave their seats as a shooting took place outside Nationals Park during an MLB game in Washington, DC, on July 17, 2021.
Benedict told reporters that two vehicles were involved in a “shootout” on a street outside of the stadium during the game. Police recovered one of the vehicles but the other remains at-large.
The two other people wounded in the shooting were associated with the recovered vehicle and are now in the hospital being questioned by police, according to Benedict. It’s unclear what their exact involvement was in the incident. Benedict also said those individuals were known to law enforcement.
The fan who was shot, a woman, is expected to recover, Benedict said. Police initially said in statements posted on Twitter that four people were shot.
The Washington Nationals had fans shelter-in-place inside the stadium during the immediate aftermath of the gunfire, according to Scott Fear, vice president for public safety and security for the Washington Nationals. A message on the scoreboard shortly after the shooting told fans to remain inside the baseball park, but it was later updated to say it was safe for fans to leave the stadium.
Fans take cover after apparent gun shots were heard during the game between the Washington Nationals and the San Diego Padres at Nationals Park.
“We held shelter in place for approximately 10 to 15 minutes. At that time we said fans were allowed, not that they had to, but they were allowed to exit through Center Field Gates and Right Field Gates on the other side of the stadium, because MPD had let me know that it was safe enough that they could go outside, out of the gate that way,” said Fear.
The remainder of the game was suspended until Sunday afternoon, the Nationals said on Twitter.
“The suspended game will resume beginning at 1:05 PM ET and be completed as a nine-inning regulation game,” the team said.
Game 3 of the Nationals-Padres series that was originally scheduled to begin at the same time Sunday but will instead be played at the conclusion of the suspended game, the team said.
San Diego Padres star Fernando Tatis Jr. posted on Twitter his appreciation for those who responded to the shooting.
“Hope everyone is safe! Just keep the prayers up thank you everyone that help in the front line! God bless,” he said.

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Nationals Park shooting: Panic as four injured outside baseball stadium in Washington DC

Nationals Park shooting: Panic as four injured outside baseball stadium in Washington DC

Mobile phone footage shared on Twitter shows nervous crowd members listening to instructions over the loudspeaker. They are told: “The action is outside the stadium.

“At this time we ask that you remain in the stadium.”

Separate footage, taken from an adjacent roof, shows dozens of people running away from the arena.

Police said shots were fired outside the stadium, near the third base gate, at 9.30pm EST on Saturday (1.30am GMT Sunday) as the Nationals faced San Diego Padres.

The game was brought to a halt and will resume at 12.05pm EST on Sunday (5.05pm GMT).

DC Police Department said in a statement: “PD is responding to a shooting in the 1500 block of South Capitol Street, SW, in which two people where shot outside of Nationals Park.

“This is currently an active investigation and it appears there is no ongoing threat at this time.

“Two additional victims associated with this incident walked into area hospitals for treatment of gunshot wounds. MPD is on scene and actively investigating at this time.

“As a result of the shooting incident, tonight’s game has been suspended.”

READ MORE: Paper from 1972 predicting collapse of society by 2050 on track, new study suggests

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: World Feed

Anti-racism protesters chant ‘love football, hate racism’ outside Downing Street

More than 100 protesters chant ‘love football, hate racism’ outside Downing Street as they hold demo in support of England’s black footballers who suffered racist abuse after Euro 2020 final

  • Protesters chant and take the knee in front of Downing Street today in solidarity with England football players
  • Chants of ‘Black Lives Matter’ ring out as demonstrators raise their fists and hold anti-racism placards aloft
  • Gathered group also heard from speakers including Labour’s former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott
  • Police have arrested five men after England footballers were targeted with hundreds of offensive posts

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More than 100 protesters chanted ‘love football, hate racism’ and took the knee in front of Downing Street today in solidarity with England football players who were racially abused after the Euro 2020 final.

Chants of ‘Black Lives Matter’ also rang out in London as the gathered demonstrators raised their fists and held anti-racism placards aloft, and heard from speakers including former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott. 

Nearly a week after England’s defeat to Italy at Wembley, the Labour politician told the group: ‘The Government wants to have its cake and eat it… (Home Secretary) Priti Patel called taking the knee gesture politics.

‘I’ll tell you what gesture politics is, it’s condemning the England players throughout the tournament and then putting on an England shirt in the semi-finals.’  

Referring to England footballers’ responses on Twitter, and echoing Bjorge Lillelien’s famous commentary line in 1981, she said: ‘Boris Johnson, your boys took a hell of a beating.’ 

It comes after the Prime Minister went to the Euro 2020 semi-final wearing his Three Lions shirt with ‘Boris 10’ on the back, while Ms Patel was pictured in an England shirt with appeared to have creases on the sleeve – causing eagle-eyed social media users to claim she had taken the jersey straight out of the packaging.

Diane Abbott (centre right) with protestors during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street today

Diane Abbott (centre right) with protestors during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street this afternoon

People during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street in London this afternoon

People during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street in London this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

This afternoon, the gathered protesters took the knee in front of Downing Street after crossing Whitehall. 

Marcus Rashford and his teammates Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sancho, who all missed penalties on Sunday, were targeted with racist abuse on social media after Sunday’s game.

Earlier this week, 19-year-old Saka told social media giants they ‘are not doing enough’ to stop racists on their platforms. 

He encouraged users to continue reporting comments to the police, but vowed not to let the negativity ‘break’ him, adding that ‘love always wins’.

The Arsenal star said: ‘To the social media platforms Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, I don’t want any child or adult to have to receive the hateful and hurtful messages that me, Marcus and Jadon have received this week. It is a sad reality that your powerful platforms are not doing enough to stop these messages.’ 

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage an anti-racism  protest against Downing Street in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage an anti-racism  protest against Downing Street in London this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott (centre) joins demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism in London this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott (centre) joins demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism in London this afternoon

A protester holds a placard as she takes part in a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group in London today

A protester holds a placard as she takes part in a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group in London today

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest outside Downing Street this afternoon as they hold placards

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest outside Downing Street this afternoon as they hold placards

Police have arrested five men after the players were targeted with hundreds of offensive posts. 

It comes as a former Metropolitan Police chief defended officers today following ugly scenes at the Euro 2020 final, but said the incident was ‘a stain on our country’s reputation’.

Hundreds of ticketless fans stormed the stadium last Sunday in an attempt to watch the historic match between England and Italy, pushing past stewards and security.

Former Met deputy assistant commissioner Andy Trotter said the behaviour was ‘disgusting’ but it was ‘simplistic’ to solely blame the police.

‘It was disgusting behaviour by fans and it does bring shame on our country,’ he told Times Radio. ‘When one reads through the accounts… there’s a whole catalogue of issues that need to be addressed.

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in a protest in London today after the England players suffered racist abuse

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in a protest in London today after the England players suffered racist abuse

Labour MP Diane Abbott joins a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

Labour MP Diane Abbott joins a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

A St. George's flag seen on the floor at the Stand Up To Racism demonstration in London this afternoon

A St. George’s flag seen on the floor at the Stand Up To Racism demonstration in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest in London this afternoon

‘I think just to pin it on the police is a bit simplistic because quite clearly there were failings everywhere. 

‘(But) I’m not trying to defend anyone here because it was an awful, awful event and a real stain on our country’s reputation.’

Mr Trotter said features of the game, such as the 8pm kick-off time on a Sunday, had allowed fans to drink all day and become ‘insensible’.

‘Most football matches go ahead with a degree of drunkenness… but alcohol is a major, major problem,’ he said. 

Demonstrators attend a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street today as they hold placards

Demonstrators attend a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street today as they hold placards

Labour MP Diane Abbott signs a man's shirt during a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott signs a man’s shirt during a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in the protest in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in the protest in London this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

‘Those people performing last Sunday are the same ones that perform in every town centre across this country on a hot Saturday night.

‘Tonight, all over the country those same people will be out getting drunk, getting drugged up and causing huge amounts of problems.’

By July 13, 897 football-related incidents and 264 arrests had been recorded across the country in the 24-hour period surrounding the final, according to the United Kingdom Football Policing Unit. 

It took the number of football-related incidents during the tournament to 2,344, and arrests to 630.

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This post originally posted here United Kingdom News

Fans sent scurrying after gunshots fired outside Nationals Park during game with the Padres, team reports

Fans sent scurrying after gunshots fired outside Nationals Park during game with the Padres, team reports

A shooting that injured multiple people has been reported outside of the Third Base Gate at Nationals Park, according to the team and DC Police.

WASHINGTON — Four people were shot Saturday outside Nationals Park located in the Navy Yard area of Washington DC, according to the Washington Nationals in a statement after the game was impacted by the developing crime situation.

The shooting happened in the 1500 block of South Capitol Street, Southwest, said D.C.Police.

Two people were found injured from gunshot wounds outside of the stadium, while two other people walked into a hospital in the area following be stuck by bullets, according to D.C. Police.

In videos from the ballpark on social media, fans can be seen running sporadically through the stadium’s concourse after gunshots were heard. Players can also be seen exiting the field of play and fans entering the field of play amid the commotion. 

The Washington Nationals were in the middle of a game with the San Diego Padres. The game has been postponed, according to MASN.

“A shooting has been reported outside of the Third Base Gate at Nationals Park.  Fans are encouraged to exit the ballpark via the CF and RF gates at this time. We’re working with law enforcement to provide more information as soon as it becomes available,” said the Washington Nationals on Twitter.

Federal and local law enforcement are investigating the shooting. 

At this time, no one that was in the stadium at the time of the shooting was injured.

The shooting comes only hours after Mayor Muriel Bowser and other D.C. and federal law enforcement officials held a news conference following a Friday night shooting in Southeast D.C. that claimed the life of a 6-year-old girl and injured five other people.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser was at the White House last Monday, joining President Biden and local leaders from around the country who are scrambling to deal with a surge in murders in a number of cities.

The president said one key is stemming the flow of firearms used to commit violent crimes.

There are over 100 shooing deaths in Washington D.C. in 2021.

The D.C. Police Union said this is the earliest the city has recorded 100 homicides since 2003. Over the last decade, the city has, on average, hit the grim mark by Oct. 25.

WUSA9 will continue to provide updates as more information comes into our newsroom.

RELATED: Police: 6-year-old girl killed, 5 other people injured in Southeast DC shooting

RELATED: Nationals Infielder Starlin Castro on administrative leave after domestic violence accusations

RELATED: Mayor Bowser asks White House for help after 100 homicides in DC

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This post originally posted here CBS8 – Sports

Police form human shield to control chaos outside Wembley Stadium as Italy equalise

Police form human shield to control chaos outside Wembley Stadium as Italy equalise

Hundreds of England fans without tickets clashed with security and police, as they attempted to enter the stadium.

After the match began police outside were pelted with bottles and other missiles.

Eyewitness Tariq Panja tweeted: “Police outside the stadium now in a standoff with a few thousand. Have had bottles thrown at them.

“Police spotter says she’s expecting worse at full time.”

Video posted by Ms Panja showed police dogs being deployed behind the main police line.

More to follow…

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People scared to walk outside after dark. Businesses closing. This is the reality for those whose day-to-day is shaped by gun violence.

Darlene Spot’s 8-year-old granddaughter, Treyce, was killed in a shooting on March 22. “Every month on the 22nd, it’s a reminder,” she said. “We just want justice.” (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

HOUMA, LOUISIANA — Darlene Spot often sits on her front steps in this small city about an hour southwest of New Orleans. It’s where she feels closest to her 8-year-old granddaughter, Treyce, who was killed in a shooting three months ago as she and her mother were driving home from a restaurant.

Near those steps, Treyce — a tiny dancer who loved butterflies — filmed TikToks. From there, she often took off on bike rides with her six cousins. On a recent day, Treyce’s 3-year-old cousin made a peanut butter sandwich and said it was for her.

But Treyce is gone, caught in the crossfire of gun violence that is ripping apart lives in cities like Baton Rouge that are known for high crime rates, but also smaller cities like Houma, population about 32,700, in south Louisiana, as well as Monroe in the northern part of the state near the border with Arkansas.


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Houma is a small city about an hour southwest of New Orleans. (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

Louisiana had the highest rate of homicides and one of the highest rates of violent crime per 100,000 people in 2019, according to a CNN analysis of the most recent data available from the FBI. But the statistics and political talking points about violent crime have often glossed over the experiences of the people whose day-to-day reality is shaped by it. Interviews with more than two dozen residents last week in three Louisiana cities, chosen for a mix of sizes, exposed the excruciating human toll of violent crime — and not just on the victims’ families.

When asked about their perceptions of crime as normal life begins to resume after the pandemic, some residents said they are scared to walk outside after dark. Business owners have had to temporarily close their doors. And teachers are left wondering whether their students will make it back into the classroom alive the next day, let alone graduate and have a future.


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English teacher Alicia Calvin said her students in Monroe have routinely dodged bullets in their daily lives. She even lost a student to gun violence two years ago. “The children need to know that we care and that there is a better way — and not just saying that, giving them hard proof.” (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

Spot cries each day for her granddaughter, who was a bright light during family fishing trips and gatherings. “I pray and I look at her picture,” she said in an interview last week, as the awning above her concrete front porch shielded her from a light rain.

These days, she said, all she hears about on the news are shootings, and so many seem to involve children: “Gun violence — it needs to stop,” she said. “The devil’s really doing his job.”

The violence, and the debate it’s sparking both in communities and on the national political stage, isn’t isolated to the Pelican State. Nationally, recent numbers from the Major Cities Chiefs Association show that homicides and aggravated assaults were up in the first quarter of this year compared with the same period last year and the year before.

Here in Louisiana, the frustration and despair run deep, with many residents affected by violent crime skeptical of any one quick fix. But that doesn’t mean they’ve given up: Many are trying to make their communities safer from the ground up — from engaging teenagers in after-school activities to trying to remove illegal guns.


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From left, Fred Sibley, Michael Adams and Adell Brown of 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge pose for a portrait outside the Triple S Food Mart, where Alton Sterling was fatally shot by Baton Rouge police officers in 2016. 100 Black Men is a national organization focused on mentoring Black youth. “At one point, I thought maybe you could run from it,” Brown said of gun violence. “But now there is nowhere you can run from it. It’s in the schools. It’s in the churches. It’s everywhere.” (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

‘It’s crushing’

Even when lives aren’t lost, violent crime is threatening livelihoods.

About a month after Treyce was shot in Houma, another shooting just 5 miles away forced business owner Lenny Swiderski to close his doors.

Gunshots were fired in his nightclub in the early hours of April 25, Swiderski said in an interview last week, sending customers running for the doors and jumping behind the bar to take cover. Five people were shot, the sheriff’s office said. All survived.

Swiderski has owned several clubs and bars in the area over the decades. For 30 years, he said, “a bad day was a black eye. Now five people get shot.” Near the bays and bayous that surround the Intracoastal Waterway, Houma was the kind of place where everybody knew everybody. But the gun violence has “just steadily gotten worse and worse and worse,” Swiderski said.


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Lenny Swiderski closed his bar and nightclub in Houma for remodeling after a shooting on April 25 injured five people. (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

“We’re not Atlanta, we’re not Chicago, we’re not Los Angeles,” he said. “We’re south Louisiana.”

Terrebonne Parish, which includes Houma, saw nine homicides in 2019 and seven last year, according to data from the Terrebonne Parish Sheriff’s Office. About halfway through 2021, the parish has seen five homicides. Officials with the sheriff’s department told CNN that violent crime has increased over the past 10 years, with shootings rising steadily while homicides have remained about the same. The Houma Police Department did not respond to questions about shootings in the area.

Since the new sheriff took office in July 2020, the Terrebonne Parish Sheriff’s Office has formed a Violent Crimes Division and a gang unit, which led to 13 indictments of suspected gang members in one gang that accounted for a large number of shootings in the area, according to Capt. Kody Voisin, chief of detectives with the Terrebonne Parish Sheriff’s Office. In a statement to CNN, he added that the department has also been trying to reduce crime perpetrated by repeat offenders by offering the incarcerated more access to drug rehabilitation programs and options to take GED and college courses, while also enhancing work release programs to make sure they are lined up with jobs when they leave.


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Bullet holes remain in the ceiling of Lenny’s club. (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

Despite those efforts, community members like Swiderski are feeling the rising crime. Today, Swiderski’s club in Houma is closed for remodeling. Bullet holes litter the ceiling, pieces of lumber are piled in front of the stage and plastic drop cloth covers liquor bottles behind the bar. Swiderski says he has to rebrand, because Houma now associates his club, Lenny’s, with the shooting.

He wanted one of the slogans for Lenny’s to be “more memories for another generation.”

“These are certainly not the memories that I want to give anybody,” he said. “It’s crushing.”

Crime as a political talking point

The spike in violent crime nationally has raised questions about what the role of the federal government should be. But in these Louisiana communities, there is pessimism about any fixes coming from Washington, where crime is just as much a political weapon to be used against opponents as it is a problem to be solved.

Crime has long been a potent campaign issue — but like many issues boiled down in 30-second campaign ads — the complexity is often obscured. Some of the most progressive members of Congress have sided with liberal activists who want to “defund the police,” while more moderate Democrats, including President Joe Biden, adamantly oppose those calls. Some prominent Democrats like South Carolina’s Rep. Jim Clyburn, the most senior Black lawmaker on Capitol Hill, have acknowledged how damaging the “defund the police” slogan was to his party in last year’s elections.


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People walk down a street near the White House painted with the “defund the police” slogan in June 2020, during the nationwide protests after George Floyd was killed by a Minneapolis police officer. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

During the 2020 campaign, Republicans effectively politicized the looting and destruction that followed some of the protests against racial injustice and tried to tie all Democrats to the “defund the police” movement. Former President Donald Trump doubled down on those attacks, seizing on recent stories about rising crime, in his first post-presidency rally last weekend.

Biden, cognizant of how Republicans intend to use the spike in crime as a line of attack against vulnerable Democrats in the 2022 midterm elections, sought to get ahead of the issue last week by announcing a slate of new measures to reduce gun violence.

“You have to prevent the crime from happening, and when it happens, support the police so that they can solve it and move on from there,” White House senior adviser Cedric Richmond, a former Louisiana congressman, told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Sunday on “State of the Union.”

Biden’s push for an overhaul of legislation on policing and guns — two issues that often come up in the national conversation about crime — have faced uphill battles in Washington, where Democrats enjoy narrow majorities in Congress and are themselves divided over both issues, particularly policing.


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President Joe Biden outlines new measures to curb gun violence on June 23, including stopping the flow of illegal guns and targeting rogue gun dealers. (Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

Bipartisan negotiators on policing signaled they had agreed on a framework last week, although a deal is still elusive and talks are continuing. One of the lead Democratic negotiators, Rep. Karen Bass of California, told CNN last week she’s worried that the uptick in crime could eventually be “used as an excuse” to say “we don’t need police reform” — a message already emerging from some Republicans.

It is difficult to pinpoint the exact reasons for the uptick in violent crime that many towns and cities are seeing as Americans resume their normal activities after the pandemic, and it is a topic of intense debate among criminologists. Many law enforcement officials have pointed to the proliferation of guns, a rise in people exhibiting mental health disorders and the year of economic turmoil caused by Covid-19, which has left many Americans out of work and still struggling financially.

After meeting with Biden and other law enforcement officials at the White House last week, Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul noted the unusual nature of the past year and how it has fed into rising crime.


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Demonstrators march through downtown New Orleans in June 2020. Protesters across the country were rallying after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (Gerald Herbert/AP)

“We all know that there was a lot of interruption of normalcy, a lot of stress, anxiety, economic hardship that was presented when the Covid crisis started,” Paul told reporters outside the White House, also pointing to the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer. “That, too, agitated scars in communities all across America.”

He noted that the 2020 election also divided the country. “All of those things create trauma. We don’t like to talk about it,” he continued. “But the reality is those sequence of events created trauma in this community. What direct relationship it has on crime, we really don’t know. But we do know that the data is different.”

Lack of opportunities for teens and young adults

Many of the people CNN spoke with, who confront crime outside their front doors every day, aren’t so much focused on a quick fix; Instead, they’re desperate to see investment in the kind of long-term infrastructure that they think could save the next generation — like after-school programs.

About 300 miles north of Houma in Monroe, a city of about 47,300 in Ouachita Parish not far from Louisiana’s border with Arkansas, Naomi Gholston, 62, said she watched from her windows earlier this month as dozens of teens argued in the street.


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Longtime Monroe resident Naomi Gholston says a victim of recent gun violence in her neighborhood could have been one of her grandchildren. (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

The argument led to the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Sherman, a recent graduate of Richwood High School who had served as the school’s quarterback.

“Bullets don’t have a name on them,” Gholston said during an interview last week at home in the Robinson Place neighborhood on the south side of the city. “It could’ve been one of my grandchildren.”

She said she’s so nervous in her neighborhood that she sleeps with her own guns beside her bed, and never leaves home after 6 p.m. She is trying to create a different life for the next generation as she works with young children as the manager at a day care center.

“The way I feel right now is that the generation is completely lost,” she said, referring to older teens.


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Michael Sherman, 18, was shot and killed in Monroe’s Robinson Place neighborhood. (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

Church and community activists in Monroe are having many of the same kinds of conversations that are taking place in Houma about how to curb the altercations among youth, particularly when the job opportunities in the region have winnowed.

“These kids are trapped in, they don’t have a lot of things to do, and that’s not just here in Monroe, that’s everywhere,” said Tyrone “K-9” Dickens, a 51-year-old activist who runs a nonprofit in Monroe that provides resources to children and the elderly in the community.

Over the past two decades, a series of major business closures has hit the community hard — from the shuttering of a State Farm operations center to the closure of a General Motors/Guide Corp. auto and truck lighting plant that had helped anchor the south side to an International Papermill plant that employed people in Monroe before it closed its doors.

Many residents point to those closures as the moment when the investment in community programs began to dry up, leaving kids with fewer opportunities for after-school activities and recreational sports leagues. Those losses were compounded by the prevalence of illegal or stolen guns, Monroe community activists said.


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Vance Price is the senior pastor at New Saint James Baptist Church in Monroe. He attended Sherman’s wake a month after officiating his brother’s wedding. (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

Two Monroe shootings between June 18 and 19 led to three people being shot, according to the Monroe Police Department. One of them was Sherman.

In an interview shortly after attending Sherman’s wake, Vance Price, the senior pastor at New Saint James Baptist Church, underscored the sudden nature of the tragedy. In May, he said he met Sherman in a tuxedo as a groomsman celebrating his brother’s wedding, which Price officiated. A month later Sherman was in a casket.

“Young people’s lives have just been shattered,” Price said, noting their anger, frustration and confusion. “They’ve had to come face-to-face with their mortality.”

Several area residents said more gun laws wouldn’t solve the problem. “We don’t need any more regulations to say we’re gonna make it harder for you to get guns,” said Na’Tasha King, a mother of three whose children attended Richwood with Sherman. “We have to get the ones off the street.”


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Na’Tasha King’s three children went to school with Sherman. (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

Elaine Clark, the office manager at First Baptist Church in Monroe, feels like the laws on the books aren’t enforced anyway.

She wants answers about why it’s so easy for teenagers to get their hands on weapons: “I don’t know if we’re giving our kids options than to just sit around and decide who should live and who shouldn’t,” Clark said.

In a series of written answers to CNN’s questions, Monroe Mayor Friday Ellis, who was elected in 2020, said crime is not up in the city recently. There were 95 shootings in 2020 and 29 shootings so far in 2021, according to city spokeswoman Michelli Martin.

Ellis wrote, “I understand the perception that exists, but we believe that if crime continues to drop as the numbers show, then we believe the perception in the community will change.”

Monroe’s Police Department did not respond to requests for comment.


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Spray paint on a barricade at the end of a dead-end road reads “Long live Bugg” in honor of Junius Benton, a 16-year-old Monroe resident who was shot and killed in 2017. (Will Lanzoni/CNN)

Baton Rouge struggles with long history of violence

Among Louisiana’s larger cities, the violence in Baton Rouge has long made national headlines, leaving residents weary and at a loss for answers about what exactly government officials can do to stop it.

A recent shooting occurred at a bar and grill a few doors down from the seafood shop where Aldric Byrd works, and he called shootings a common occurrence.

“All throughout the city, (there’s) no pinpointing where the next event is gonna happen at, because you got a lot of people that’s cut loose with guns,” Byrd said in an interview last week. “They think they got three lives.”


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Aldric Byrd is a manager at a seafood restaurant in Baton Rouge. A recent shooting a few doors down from the restaurant left two people dead and six wounded. Byrd blames an uptick in gun violence on social media and people being quick to anger. “Be the bigger person,” he says. “Walk away.” (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

Casey Phillips, the executive director of the nonprofit The Walls Project, which works on social justice and community issues, said the pandemic had exacerbated myriad factors contributing to the violence. Many children who relied on school for both education and stability faced disruptions from Covid-19 last year; people fell on hard times and lost reliable access to food, he said.

“You’re looking at economic despair, mental health, a lack of access to critical needs on top of a lack of hope and no real path forward,” Phillips said. “People are just taking things into their own hands.”

Like so many others CNN met in Louisiana, Phillips is skeptical about measures that Biden outlined to address rising gun violence, but he tries to maintain an optimistic outlook. He points to the efforts closest to the ground in his city as those that can make an incremental difference.


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Casey Phillips, the executive director of The Walls Project, won’t point to any single root cause of gun violence. “It’s not any one thing. It’s all of it together,” he says. “I think the systems are failing people that need it the most.” (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

One of them is the organization run by Elizabeth Robinson of Baton Rouge, whose 29-year-old son, Louis, was killed in a shooting three years ago. She started an anti-gun-violence organization called CHANGE after her son’s death, canvassing high-crime neighborhoods in her city with about 10 other women, most of whom she said have lost their sons or nephews to gun violence.

They try to reach out to other mothers during their walks, offering to get rid of any guns in their homes if they have children and worry those weapons could fall into the wrong hands.

Robinson also talks directly to the young men carrying guns, who, she said, often tell her they do so because they need to protect themselves. She says she can’t tell them to put their guns down, because she knows the fear for their lives is real. “It’s just about you pulling that trigger,” she tells them. “Sometimes you got to walk away. Sometimes you got to be the bigger man.”


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Elizabeth Robinson’s son Louis was shot and killed in the Zion City neighborhood of Baton Rouge on May 2, 2018. He was 29 and left behind three young children. “They have to go to a graveyard for Father’s Day,” she says. (Edmund D. Fountain for CNN)

As hard as Robinson and the other women work, she acknowledges that it is difficult to fully comprehend the dangers until you lose someone close to you. Last week, shortly before she spoke to CNN, she got a Facebook message from another mother.

“Good morning, love,” the message to Robinson said. “I never thought I would see this day, but yesterday it was my son that got killed.”

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16-year-old arrested in deadly shooting of a grandmother outside gym in SE Houston

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — A 16-year-old suspect was arrested Friday afternoon for the deadly shooting of Elsa Mikeska, a 62-year-old grandmother, outside of a southeast Houston gym last week, Houston police said.

HPD homicide detectives will not be releasing the suspect’s name or photo due to his age.

“I want to commend our detectives for their diligent efforts in this case,” said HPD Chief Troy Finner in a tweet. “As with any tragic loss of life, we share in the Mikeska family’s grief, and want them, and all families who have lost loved ones to violence to know we will work tirelessly to bring these criminals to justice.”

Last Thursday, Mikeska was arriving for a 5 a.m. exercise class when she was ambushed in the parking lot in an attempted robbery.

Now, a makeshift memorial sits next to the spot where Mikeska died outside Life Fit Personal Fitness Studio, located in the 10500 block of Fuqua Street near Beamer Road.

Her funeral took place Thursday.

Late Thursday, Houston police released surveillance video of the suspects’ vehicle.

16-year-old arrested in deadly shooting of a grandmother outside gym in SE Houston

The suspects’ white Chevrolet SUV parked near the victim just before 5 a.m. Thursday, and two people got out. Officers say the suspects confronted the woman and she took off running toward the gym before they opened fire, killing her.

ORIGINAL STORY: Woman shot and killed while trying to flee carjackers outside SE Houston gym, police say

Mikeska was a member of the gym and fellow gym members described her as a regular.

The gym shooting wasn’t the only incident police believe the suspects are connected to.

An hour before, officers say the suspects attempted to carjack a vehicle from a woman at 10100 Freehill Street, about two miles from the gym. The car was broken down, so they weren’t able to steal it. The victim ran, and no shots were fired.

Officers said they aren’t sure why the suspects opened fire when the victim ran toward the gym.

Police said the investigation remains active despite the arrest. They added that they’re looking for information regarding other individuals believed to be in the SUV, which HPD identified as a Suburban.

The suspects are described only as possibly Hispanic males in their early 20s, police said.

If anyone has any information to share, please call HPD Homicide 713-308-3600 or remain anonymous and call Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS.

Suspects still on the run 1 day after grandmother shot and killed outside SE Houston gym

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Copyright © 2021 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Author: Shelley Childers

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Take that, Brussels! Brexit win as London STILL world's most vital fintech hub outside US

Take that, Brussels! Brexit win as London STILL world's most vital fintech hub outside US

The 2021 Global Fintech Rankings, compiled by Findexable, also showed the fintech space outside of the capital and throughout the rest of the UK is expanding at a rapid pace. This is evidence Brexit and the current Covid pandemic has had next to no impact on London’s start-up scene, with the City’s fintech space predominantly powered by the growing “challenger bank” sector. 

The newly-published Index, which first came out in 2019, ranks the fintech ecosystems of more than 264 cities across 83 countries, using Findexable’s data from its own records.

Data has also been collated and verified by the industry’s Global Partnership Network, which includes more than 60 fintech associations around the world.

London remains second behind San Francisco, and despite making a number of substantial gains since last year’s Index, EU countries have been unable to unseat the capital in the rankings.

EU cities such as Berlin have risen three places to sixth and Stockholm jump 21 positions to 14th, while Moscow and Zurich both moved up 12 spots to 18th and 26th respectively.

Hamburg leaped 13 places to 30th but in a major blow for the Brussels trading bloc, Paris plunged 21 positions to a lowly 36th.

But the latest Index also shows massive progress for a number of UK cities outside of London as the country continues to defy gloomy post-Brexit forecasts.

The latest rankings show two UK cities have made it into the top 50.

Manchester has climbed 19 places to 34th position, while Cambridge surged into the top 40 by jumping a massive 55 places to 38th position.

READ MORE: Brexit LIVE: EU plot to grab City business begins

“We have even seen fintech companies emerge in towns like Macclesfield, Ashford, Caerphilly and Inverness.”

He added: “It is part of a greater push toward bridging the gap between companies and their customers that we have identified happening across the world since the annual report started in 2019, but which has accelerated in the last 12 months as a result of the pandemic driving more people to use digital finance.

“Where there are more customers there will be more businesses, and in an innovation-driven sector like fintech that translates to greater chances for new ideas that can shake up the entire industry.”

Mambu Chief Customer Officer Elliott Limb, chief customer officer of cloud banking platform Mambu, said: “Fintechs are part of a global revolution to make financial services easier, faster and simpler, and the UK is a major part of this.

“They are changing the way we save, spend, borrow, and invest money.

“Whether competing, cooperating or supporting traditional financial institutions, they are reshaping digital services for a real-time, on-demand world.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Finance Feed