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Get to Know F1 2021’s Braking Point Characters

Summary

  • Take a closer look at the key characters in F1 2021’s Braking Point story mode.
  • Braking Point is the most ambitious narrative-driven mode ever seen in the F1 series.
  • Play the story in F1 2021 starting July 16 on Xbox One and Xbox Series X|S.

Every story has a beginning – and in less than a month’s time, you’ll be able to experience a gripping racing story in F1 2021, courtesy of our new mode: Braking Point.

One of many new additions to this year’s official Formula 1 title from Codemasters and EA Sports, Braking Point combines thrilling racing and immersive storytelling for a fresh narrative-driven experience, inspired by the modern-day F1 paddock. Of course, to create a story as ambitious as this, you need a stellar and varied cast of characters, and Braking Point delivers exactly that: a gifted rising star, a fearless veteran, a returning loud-mouthed rival, and plenty more.

Today, we’re giving you the scoop on five of the key Braking Point characters in F1 2021. Without further ado, let’s meet the stars of our show…


Aiden Jackson

The journey to the top is rarely simple. Aiden Jackson’s rapid rise towards the F1 grid has been a Cinderella story, and he’s already making waves in the pinnacle of motorsport, but the youngster’s charm and confidence is rocked by fierce new rivalries and the media spotlight. Aiden’s opportunity to become a F1 superstar is at its breaking point in his debut season – he’ll need all his talent, resolve, and nerve to navigate obstacles on and off the track to realise that dream.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Casper Akkerman

A seasoned veteran of the paddock, ‘Cas’ is an ice-cold, no-nonsense personality, looking for more glory in the twilight of his career. Consistent on the track and in front of the cameras, Akkerman is an important part of a team determined to lift themselves above the midfield battle. Whilst he is fully focused on not going quietly into the night, a new rival and rising tensions within his team are forcing Casper to reassess his approach to racing.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Devon Butler

No good story is complete without a classic villain. Devon is a cocky and brash upstart desperate to make a name for himself and will happily do so at the expense of others. Sounds annoying, right? What’s more irritating, though, is that Devon has the speed and the skill on track to back up his arrogant persona. Whether you’re behind the wheel or in the paddock, overcoming Braking Point’s antagonist will be much easier said than done.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Brian Doyle

An infectious passion for the sport and unmatched work ethic have made Brian a mainstay of the F1 scene, well known as a strong manager of people and situations behind the scenes. A direct liaison between the Team Principal and other personnel, including the drivers, Brian must handle politics and personalities at all times – and perhaps his only weakness is balancing his emotions when things don’t quite to plan. Expect to see plenty of Brian as the intense story on and off the track unfolds.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Zoe Akkerman

The wife of Casper and a well-known figure in the paddock, Zoe has been right there with her husband through his F1 trials and tribulations. Now a mother to their young daughter, Lily, Zoe is always on hand to offer some grounding advice and sympathetic support to ‘Cas’ – but she’s also acutely aware of the demons her partner is facing as a new generation of competitors are pushing to take Casper’s place. Zoe’s influence is needed now more than ever.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Braking Point: A Brand New F1 2021 Story Experience

Each of these characters and their journeys are interwoven to the narrative of Braking Point, as you play across three seasons, with five selectable teams, and aim to realise the dream of F1 glory. Alongside high-stakes racing action, experience dramatic moments away from the circuit, fierce confrontations, and plenty of twists and turns along the way. Unique story touchpoints, news articles, social media updates, and more will help set the scene, as you plot a path towards a shot at stardom.

F1 2021 - Braking Point

Braking Point is a huge addition for F1 2021, but it’s far from the only one. Take on Career mode in new ways with a two-player option or Real-Season Start, which adds in this season’s live standings and lets you join the action at any point in the championship that has already occurred. They join an already-stellar feature set, including My Team which allows you to create, manage, and race for your very own F1 team, and a host of thrilling online options that cater for experienced and first-time racers alike.

F1 2021 isn’t just a new chapter for the series, it’s an entirely new story – and we can’t wait for you to begin yours on July 16, or July 13 if you pre-order the digital Deluxe Edition!

Xbox LiveXbox Live

F1® 2021

Electronic Arts

• The entire F1® 2021 game
• Braking Point Content Pack
• Celebrate the release of F1® 2021 with exclusive in-game items inspired by the fictional stars of the new ‘Braking Point’ story experience. Equip them to race as Devon Butler, Aiden Jackson, and Casper Akkerman: Character avatar | Car livery | Suit | Gloves | Helmet | Victory radio voices
• 5,000 PitCoin virtual currency to spend in-game

Every story has a beginning in F1® 2021, the official videogame of the 2021 FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP™. Enjoy the stunning new features of F1® 2021, including the thrilling story experience ‘Braking Point’, two-player Career, and get even closer to the grid with ‘Real-Season Start’. Take your team to the top in the acclaimed ten-year ‘My Team’ Career mode, or race head-to-head in split-screen and multiplayer. Immerse yourself in the greatest racing spectacle on the planet and race with the authentic lineup of twenty heroic drivers and ten iconic teams from the 2021 season:
– ‘Braking Point’ – the thrilling new story experience
– New ways to play: two-player Career and ‘Real-Season Start’
– Acclaimed ‘My Team’, split-screen and multiplayer

* Online connection required to download the final F1® teams’ 2021 cars, full-season circuit selection, content (as applicable) and F2™ 2021 season update.

INTERNET CONNECTION & ALL GAME UPDATES REQUIRED TO ACCESS THE FINAL F1® TEAMS’ 2021 CARS, CERTAIN CIRCUITS, CONTENT (AS APPLICABLE) AND F2™ 2021 SEASON UPDATE. SEE www.formula1game.com/2021 FOR DETAILS & AVAILABILITY OF THREE NEW CIRCUITS: PORTIMÃO, IMOLA AND JEDDAH. ACCEPTANCE OF EA USER AGREEMENT (terms.ea.com) REQUIRED TO PLAY. EA’S PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY APPLIES (privacy.ea.com). YOU CONSENT TO ANY PERSONAL DATA COLLECTED THROUGH YOUR USE OF EA’S SERVICES BEING TRANSFERRED TO THE UNITED STATES, AS FURTHER EXPLAINED IN THE PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY. EA MAY PROVIDE CERTAIN FREE INCREMENTAL CONTENT &/OR UPDATES. MANDATORY CONTENT UPDATES MAY BE DOWNLOADED AUTOMATICALLY, REQUIRE ADDITIONAL STORAGE, INCUR BANDWIDTH USAGE FEES, & REQUIRE AN ADDITIONAL PURCHASE TO ACCESS. EA MAY RETIRE ONLINE FEATURES AFTER 30 DAYS NOTICE POSTED ON ea.com/service-updates.

F1® 2021 Game – an official product of the FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP. © 2021 Electronic Arts Inc. The F1 logo, F1, FORMULA 1 and related marks are trademarks of Formula One Licensing BV, a Formula 1 company. Licensed by Formula One World Championship Limited. The F2 FIA FORMULA 2 CHAMPIONSHIP logo, FORMULA 2, F2 and related marks are trademarks of the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile and used exclusively under licence. All rights reserved.

Xbox LiveXbox Live

F1® 2021 Deluxe Edition

Electronic Arts

• Three days early access

• The entire F1® 2021 game

• My Team Icons Pack –
Seven iconic drivers to enhance your ‘My Team’ game experience: Schumacher, Senna, Prost, Rosberg, Button, Massa and Coulthard.
Exclusive in-game customisation items: Car livery | Suit | Gloves | Helmet | Victory radio call.

• Braking Point Content Pack –
Celebrate the release of F1® 2021 with exclusive in-game items inspired by the fictional stars of the new ‘Braking Point’ story experience. Equip them to race as Devon Butler, Aiden Jackson, and Casper Akkerman: Character avatar | Car livery | Suit | Gloves | Helmet | Victory radio voices.

• 18,000 PitCoin virtual currency to spend in-game.

Every story has a beginning in F1® 2021, the official videogame of the 2021 FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP™. Enjoy the stunning new features of F1® 2021, including the thrilling story experience ‘Braking Point’, two-player Career, and get even closer to the grid with ‘Real-Season Start’. Take your team to the top in the acclaimed ten-year ‘My Team’ Career mode, or race head-to-head in split-screen and multiplayer. Immerse yourself in the greatest racing spectacle on the planet and race with the authentic lineup of twenty heroic drivers and ten iconic teams from the 2021 season:
– ‘Braking Point’ – the thrilling new story experience
– New ways to play: two-player Career and ‘Real-Season Start’
– Acclaimed ‘My Team’, split-screen and multiplayer

* Online connection required to download the final F1® teams’ 2021 cars, full-season circuit selection, content (as applicable) and F2™ 2021 season update.

INTERNET CONNECTION & ALL GAME UPDATES REQUIRED TO ACCESS THE FINAL F1® TEAMS’ 2021 CARS, CERTAIN CIRCUITS, CONTENT (AS APPLICABLE) AND F2™ 2021 SEASON UPDATE. SEE www.formula1game.com/2021 FOR DETAILS & AVAILABILITY OF THREE NEW CIRCUITS: PORTIMÃO, IMOLA AND JEDDAH. ACCEPTANCE OF EA USER AGREEMENT (terms.ea.com) REQUIRED TO PLAY. EA’S PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY APPLIES (privacy.ea.com). YOU CONSENT TO ANY PERSONAL DATA COLLECTED THROUGH YOUR USE OF EA’S SERVICES BEING TRANSFERRED TO THE UNITED STATES, AS FURTHER EXPLAINED IN THE PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY. EA MAY PROVIDE CERTAIN FREE INCREMENTAL CONTENT &/OR UPDATES. MANDATORY CONTENT UPDATES MAY BE DOWNLOADED AUTOMATICALLY, REQUIRE ADDITIONAL STORAGE, INCUR BANDWIDTH USAGE FEES & REQUIRE AN ADDITIONAL PURCHASE TO ACCESS. EA MAY RETIRE ONLINE FEATURES AFTER 30 DAYS NOTICE POSTED ON ea.com/service-updates.

F1® 2021 Game – an official product of the FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP. © 2021 Electronic Arts Inc. The F1 logo, F1, FORMULA 1 and related marks are trade marks of Formula One Licensing BV, a Formula 1 company. Licensed by Formula One World Championship Limited. The F2 FIA FORMULA 2 CHAMPIONSHIP logo, FORMULA 2, F2 and related marks are trade marks of the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile and used exclusively under licence. All rights reserved.

Author: Jennifer Marshall, Social Media Manager, F1 2021
This post originally appeared on Xbox Wire

Indiana Jones 5: Will Indiana Jones lose his right eye? He does at one point later in life

An elderly man at this point, Indy still wore his famous fedora hat, but he also had a big scar over his right eye which was covered by an eye patch.

As for how and when Indy lost his right eye in the franchise’s canon is anyone’s guess.

But since the show aired, we’ve had the 1957 set Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, in which the archaeologist adventurer’s eye remained intact.

Just as it continues to in the set photos for Indiana Jones 5, which may take place in the late 1960s as mentioned.

Author: George Simpson
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Entertainment Feed

Possible Failure Point Emerges in Miami Building Collapse

The investigation into what may be the deadliest accidental building collapse in American history has just begun, but experts who have examined video footage of the disaster outside Miami are focusing on a spot in the lowest part of the condominium complex — possibly in or below the underground parking garage — where an initial failure could have set off a structural avalanche.

Called “progressive collapse,” the gradual spread of failures could have occurred for a variety of reasons, including design flaws or the less robust construction allowed under the building codes of four decades ago, when the complex was built. But that progression could not have occurred without some critical first failure, and close inspections of a grainy surveillance video that emerged in the initial hours after the disaster have given the first hints of where that might have been.

“It does appear to start either at or very near the bottom of the structure,” said Donald O. Dusenberry, a consulting engineer who has investigated many structural collapses. “It’s not like there’s a failure high and it pancaked down.”

The early examinations came as rescuers on Sunday spent a fourth day pushing through the enormous heap of debris created when half the 13-story building, Champlain Towers South, fell away early on Thursday. The death toll climbed to nine as additional remains were found, and more than 150 people remained unaccounted for.

While a number of bridges, overpasses and buildings under construction fail each year, the catastrophic collapse of an occupied building — absent a bomb or an earthquake — is rare, and investigators are struggling to understand how it could have come with so little urgent warning.

“It would be like a lightning strike happening,” said Charles W. Burkett, the mayor of Surfside, Fla., where the collapse occurred. “It’s not at all a common occurrence to have a building fall down in America,” he said. “There was something very, very wrong with this situation.”

The National Institute of Standards and Technology, a federal agency, was sending scientists and engineers to do a preliminary review, hoping to identify and preserve materials that might help understand the collapse. Officials said they expected a number of local, state and federal agencies also to be involved in the inquiry, though it was not clear which agency would lead the effort.

The search for an explanation comes with a sense of urgency not only for sister buildings near the complex but also for a broad part of South Florida, where a necklace of high-rise condos, many of them decades old, sits on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, enduring an ever-worsening barrage of hurricane winds, storm surge and sea salt.

Structural engineers were shocked that a building that had stood for decades would abruptly crumble on an otherwise unremarkable summer night.

But three years before the deadly collapse, a consultant found alarming evidence of “major structural damage” to the concrete slab below the pool deck and “abundant” cracking and crumbling of the columns, beams and walls of the parking garage under the building.

While no definitive conclusions could be drawn from the surveillance video, which was shot from a distance and reveals only one perspective of the disaster, some of the engineers reviewing it last week said it seemed to suggest that the failure began at a specific point near the bottom of the structure — perhaps as far down as the parking garage beneath the building, or on the first few floors.

From what can be seen in the video, part of the structure first slumped, seemingly falling vertically in one giant piece, as if the columns had failed beneath the southern edge of the center of the building, not far from the pool. Like a nightmarish avalanche, the failure quickly spread and brought down the entire center of the building. Seconds later, a large section to the east also toppled.

Mr. Dusenberry, whose impressions matched those of several other structural engineers who examined the video, said such a failure “would suggest a foundation-related matter — potentially corrosion or other damage at a lower level.” But he said it was not certain that corrosion was the culprit, and added that “you certainly can’t rule out a design or construction error that has survived for 40 years.”

One other clue that a problem started at the bottom of the building: Immediately before the collapse, one of the residents saw a hole of sorts opening near the pool.

Michael Stratton said his wife, Cassie Stratton, who is missing, was on the phone with him and was looking out through the window of her fourth-floor unit when, she told him, the hole appeared. After that, the call cut off.

Rick De La Guardia, an engineer based in Miami with experience in forensic investigation of building component failures, said that the collapse could have also started higher than the foundation, possibly on the second floor, based on his cursory review of the columns in the floor plans and his review of the video.

Explanations for an initial failure at the bottom of the building could include a problem with the deep, reinforced concrete pilings on which the building sits — perhaps set off by an unknown void or a sinkhole below — which then compromised the lower columns. Or the steel reinforcing the columns in the parking garage or first few floors could have been so corroded that they somehow gave way on their own. Or the building itself could have been poorly designed, built with substandard concrete or steel — or simply with insufficient steel at critical points.

Evan Bentz, a professor of structural engineering at the University of Toronto, said that the best evidence so far had come from the video and some simple reasoning — pointing a finger of suspicion at the supporting columns in the underground parking garage.

“The primary purpose of all the columns in the basement is to hold the structure up in the air,” he said. “Because the structure stopped being held up in the air, the simplest explanation is that the columns in the basement ceased to function.”

The extreme rarity of major building collapses in the United States deepens the mystery, engineers said, especially considering that Champlain Towers South had remained upright for four decades and had no obvious failure before much of it tumbled to the ground.

“It stood for 40 years and it collapsed relatively suddenly,” said Glenn R. Bell, director of Collaborative Reporting for Safer Structures, a program in the Structural Engineering Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers. “Why did it collapse at that moment?”

The 2018 report from the consultant, an engineer hired by the condo owners’ association to examine the building, helped set in motion plans for a $ 12 million repair project that had been set to start soon — more than two and a half years after the building managers were warned about the structural damage.

The corrosion of reinforcing steel identified in that report could have been a critical issue if it occurred on or near the supporting columns and was pronounced enough, Mr. Dusenberry said.

“If I were an investigator, I would check this as an issue,” he said.

But other structural engineers said that some level of corrosion was common in old buildings and was unlikely to bring a building down on its own.

A crucial clue is still unknown, Professor Bentz said, and “that would probably be found under the debris where the collapse seemed to start.”

The structural fiber of the building was largely reinforced concrete. That means the floor slabs upon which apartments sat were made of concrete that was poured around horizontal lengths of rebar, or stout steel rods, that provided critical strength when the concrete dried. Likewise, the columns that held up the slabs were created by pouring concrete around vertical stretches of rebar.

The corrosion of the rebar in the slabs, as revealed in the 2018 report, was probably significant only if it occurred in places where the slabs joined with the columns, Mr. Dusenberry said. Corrosion there could have weakened the connection to the columns, potentially leading to a failure, he said.

The same idea holds for the reinforced concrete pilings — deeply buried, vertical supports on which the entire building sat, said David Peraza, a structural engineer at Exponent, an engineering and scientific consulting firm.

A previously reported academic study showed that the entire coastline in the area of the building has been settling, or sinking, at the rate of a couple of millimeters a year. But the deep piles would have provided stability, Mr. Peraza said.

Danger would emerge only if there had been something like a void or a sinkhole that had caused one or several piles to settle downward and left the others unchanged. That could have threatened the structure that sat atop those piles: columns in the underground parking garage.

“Whether there’s something geologically under the building that caused this, that’s definitely something that’s got to be investigated,” Mr. Peraza said.

Another possibility is improperly installed piles, he said.

One last theory under consideration is the possibility that heavy construction next door in 2019 could have damaged the Champlain Towers building. An email released by the city on Sunday revealed that a member of the condo board had gone to the city for help at the time, expressing “concerns regarding the structure of our building.”

Town officials declined to intervene, suggesting that the residents hire someone to monitor any impacts.

Clues to any of those problems will be clear only after the rescue operation ends, recovery begins and engineers dig all the way to the bottom of the debris pile, Mr. Peraza said. He added that investigators should also examine construction documents that describe exactly how the piles were built.

Gregg Schlesinger, a contractor and lawyer in Florida, said that cracks and a kind of crumbling in the concrete known as “spalling,” also identified in the 2018 report, should have been a “red flag” if it seemed serious at the time. If that were the case, he said, engineers should have dug deeper to find out what was causing the deterioration.

“There are questions that are relevant around spalling where the concrete falls off of the structural elements,” Mr. Schlesinger said. “But no real research was done into why this stuff was coming off the wall and what was causing that.”

The weeks ahead will involve a meticulous dig to unearth clues that Mr. Dusenberry likened to an archaeological excavation.

Engineers will record each layer photographically, possibly with drones, before moving on to the next.

Collapsed portions of the building will most likely be taken apart piece by piece and reassembled at another location where experts can assess them. They will also do “petrography” on the concrete — studying it chemically and microscopically to test its strength and quality. They will measure the thickness of the slabs and columns and the positioning of the steel to see if it all matches the design drawings.

Donna DiMaggio Berger, a lawyer who represents the condo association, said that members of the association board — the ones who survived — had been left dumbfounded and hoping for answers. Nothing in the 2018 assessment presented to the board had suggested that the building was at risk of collapse, she said, and the board’s “deliberative” approach to doing necessary repairs had been based on the assumption that there was time to do it right.

“The sense of urgency is directly tied to the wording used and the consequences outlined in the report,” Ms. Berger said. “All boards can do is rely on the advice of the professional advisers that they engaged.”

Patricia Mazzei and Joseph B. Treaster contributed reporting.

Author: James Glanz, Anjali Singhvi and Mike Baker
This post originally appeared on NYT > Top Stories

Review: Disgaea 6: Defiance of Destiny – A Series High Point, Just Not For Performance

Disgaea 6: Defiance of Destiny feels like an oddly topical title for Nippon Ichi Software. About two years ago, the company effectively ran out of money following a catastrophic mobile game launch, and it certainly appeared for a while that Nippon Ichi was going to go under. Somehow, the publisher managed to weather the worst of this storm, which enabled it to defy the odds and release at least one more mainline Disgaea game. This could very well be the final Disgaea release, but if it is, at least the makers can rest easy knowing that it went out with a bang. Disgaea 6 is the most streamlined and enjoyable entry yet, demonstrating a thorough mastery of the in-depth mechanics that made this turn-based tactical series such a cult hit.

Disgaea 6 features a fittingly goofy narrative with plenty of over the top ‘anime humor’, although there are some moments of genuine emotion scattered around in there. The main narrative follows a zombie boy named Zed, who’s hellbent on killing a nameless god of destruction terrorizing the Netherworld. Zed isn’t initially all that great of a fighter, and he is killed rather easily nearly every time he confronts his foe. Fortunately, Zed has the power to “Super Reincarnate” every time he dies, and he gets just a little more powerful every time he comes back to life.

It’s far from the most interesting story ever told in an RPG, but Disgaea 6 smartly opts to revel in the ridiculous and over-the-top kind of humor the series has become known for. Things like Prinnies (the series’ stupid, exploding penguins that end most sentences in “dood”) or a princess who aggressively wants to marry Zed help to keep the plot from ever approaching anything remotely ‘serious’.

This silliness permeates nearly every facet of Disgaea 6. How many games have you played where a piece of equipment’s main selling point is that it protects you from potato chip grease? How many times have you fought an enemy named Flosses Regularly? It’s not often that a game commits this hard to such an intentionally lighthearted tone, and while the humor may be hit or miss, it is consistently interesting and memorable.

Gameplay in Disgaea 6 initially follows a standard SRPG format, wherein you move characters around a grid-based map and try to wipe out the enemy before they get you first. In this regard, Disgaea 6 is probably at its most conventional, although there is a considerable amount of depth to the combat as you progress. There are well over a dozen different classes to mix into your team, and supplementary things like combo and team attacks ensure that carefully planning out your strategy pays off dividends. This SRPG aspect of Disgaea 6 is impressively well-built and just as engaging as you’d expect out of a relatively high-profile release in the genre. However, it could very much be argued that the primary gameplay of Disgaea 6 is more meta than simply another turn-based tactics game.

Despite most of the gameplay ostensibly happening on the grid-based battlefields, there’s an awful lot of focus placed on effective management of the absurdly in-depth systems that surround that combat. For example, there’s a senate chamber in the main hub where monsters and demons from various fictional political parties vote on the underlying rules of the game. If you want to earn more experience or would like to unlock a new class type, you have to get a bill passed with a majority vote. Or, in another example, there’s a “Cheat Shop” where you can dial up or down specific markers of progress. So, if you would rather earn more money after each battle, you can dial down how much skill experience your characters gain on average.

The presence of features like this indicate where the real Disgaea 6 is thus experienced. Sure, you can just play through the main campaign and get a satisfying experience, but this is a game that could potentially last you hundreds of hours if you really want to go for it. The level cap is, no joke, set at 99,999,999 and you can eventually do 10,000,000,000,000,000 damage in a single attack. To hit those kinds of numbers, and to be capable of taking on the kind of content the enormous endgame has to offer, you have to be ready to ‘break’ the entire game in the way it encourages you to, and this makes for a strategic experience unlike anything else out there today. With the exception of previous games in the series, of course; Disgaea veterans will be pleased to find all the crazy numbers and systems they expect present and correct.

Fortunately, Disgaea 6 has opted to integrate plenty of quality of life features that easily make this the most accessible and streamlined entry in the series yet. Chief among these is the new “Demonic Intelligence” feature, which allows you to program each character on your team with an extremely in-depth logic system that mimics the Gambit system of Final Fantasy XII. With this, you can specify actions you want characters to perform in specific situations, which takes a ton of tedium out of having to manually navigate the menus and select actions for every character on every turn. For example, it’s a lot easier to just program a character to target and approach the nearest enemy and use a random attack skill. And with how in-depth these instruction sets can get, there’s a lot of fun to be had in tweaking their commands to make your team a perfectly well-functioning, autonomous machine that cuts through enemies with ease.

Taking this demonic intelligence system and pairing it with the new auto-battle options thus cuts down the boredom of extended grinding sessions. It may sound a little silly to be praising a game for decreasing the amount of time you have to spend actually playing it, but this goes back to the main draw of the gameplay being more about the management side of things, rather than the raw actions of manually commanding the team. The main thing these new quality of life features do is decrease the amount of repetitive work you have to do to obtain rewards. You still have to build effective teams, kit them out with the right skills and equipment, and know how to program them to fight efficiently. It’s just that now it only takes you ten minutes to accomplish the same things that in previous entries would have required at least an hour.

All of this is to say, Disgaea 6 is the very embodiment of the concept of ‘min-maxing’. It prods you to turn your attention to every little detail of your characters’ builds and to think of ways you can either maximize values or literally break the rules so you can take them beyond their maximums. There are numerous avenues you can take to do so, which can be rather intimidating to newcomers who aren’t familiar with all the nuances of a Disgaea game. Disgaea 6 does a solid job of including lots of tutorials and explanations, enough to say that this is probably the most approachable entry yet, but be prepared to do quite a bit of studying before you finally ‘get it’.

While gameplay remains consistently addictive, it must be said that Disgaea 6 really drops the ball with its presentation. The all-new 3D models properly bear the series’ signature art style and they’re animated quite well, but performance is quite poor at the time of writing. There are three display options which allow you to pick between graphics, framerate, or a middle ground, but none of them feel fully satisfying. Either everything is 60 FPS and distractingly blurry, or the resolution is sharp and the framerate tanks. It’s not immediately clear why this is the case, as Disgaea 6 doesn’t appear to be a very graphically intensive game, but these serious performance issues definitely drag down an otherwise excellent experience.

Conclusion

If you weren’t allured by the distinctive style and crazy in-depth gameplay of previous entries in the franchise, Disgaea 6: Defiance of Destiny certainly isn’t the game to change your mind. Like its predecessors, Disgaea 6 is still a goofy and staggeringly intricate SRPG that will take hundreds of hours to see through to completion. However, this is easily the most streamlined and enjoyable entry in the series yet, as the developers have doubled down on everything that makes these games great and made some improvements, too. It can be intimidating to get into as a newcomer, and the performance is frequently disappointing, but we would still absolutely recommend that you add Disgaea 6 to your library.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Reviews

Valtteri Bottas explains explosive French GP radio message – 'I made my point clear'

“Nobody knows about the constructive meetings we have with the team between races and over race weekends, I don’t think it’s anything new,” he added. “I always try and be direct, and I’m glad if you liked it, but I wasn’t happy obviously in that situation.

“But that’s racing, that’s emotions, it’s so hard to describe the feeling when you’re in the car, we’re not in a tea party, we’re in an elite top sport and I want to do well, I want the team to do well, so we race with emotions, even for a Finn.”

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Sport Feed

New videos show Jan. 6 US Capitol riot from officers' point of view

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department released six never-before-seen clips of police body-camera and surveillance footage showing rioters harassing and attacking police on January 6 around the US Capitol.

With several taken from the viewpoint of DC Metropolitan Police officers as they were overrun, the videos are the latest chilling example of how a pro-Trump crowd broke past police into the federal building and disrupted Congress.

While police worked together to protect themselves and the building, hundreds of angry rioters outnumbered them.

Assaulting police is one of the charges the Justice Department has brought against dozens of Capitol riot defendants, among nearly 500 federal criminal cases.

More than a dozen news outlets have spent months seeking access to videos used in court against Capitol riot defendants. Much of the police body-camera footage and surveillance tapes that are now being used in court still haven’t been seen publicly, and judges have just begun ordering the release of tapes used in court in cases in recent days, including the six released on Wednesday.

Another judge on Wednesday in the same courthouse applauded Chief Judge Beryl Howell for ordering video to be released, saying they would show Republican lawmakers how serious the siege was — and that the rioters were far from acting like tourists.

In some of the video clips, police body cameras capture almost an hour of the siege from the officers’ point of view, as police walk through the crowd around the Capitol and the crowd screams insults at them.

Rioters yell at the police “f**king traitors,” “pigs” and “a**holes,” and then a man with a skateboard, who prosecutors say is 21-year-old Grady Owens of Texas, hits police with it.

Owens is charged with six crimes, including assaulting officers with a dangerous weapon, impeding passage through the Capitol and other violence on the grounds. He has pleaded not guilty.

Two more of the newly released clips related to Owens’ case are from an overhead camera in a doorway at the Capitol, showing how rioters continued to push against a police line to get into the building.

In other police body-camera clips released Wednesday, the police line point of view picks up a separate clash where the rioters attacked.

One clip, taken around 2:30 p.m. that day, shows Capitol and DC police officers in a skirmish with a man in a red “Make America Great Again” hat. Police officers then fall to the ground, and the melee continues — with some supporters with their hands up, another wearing a gas mask, an object being lobbed into the air toward police and another man yelling, “Get out!”

Prosecutors say this video captures riot defendant Brian Mock of Minneapolis yelling and shoving a police officer. Mock is also alleged to have kicked an officer on the ground.

In the second clip related to Mock’s case, from four minutes later on January 6, a police officer with a riot shield has been pushed to the ground amid another skirmish with the pro-Trump crowd. The rioters surrounding the Capitol then begin chanting, “USA! USA!” Prosecutors say this showed Mock taking riot shields from officers.

Mock hasn’t been formally indicted at this time. His attorneys have argued he wasn’t assaulting officers — other than a shove and a kick — and instead was encouraging them to leave the scene in front of the Capitol.

One of the officers in the second video bruised his elbow when he fell to the concrete, prosecutors told a judge earlier this week.

A judge in Minnesota, where Mock was initially arrested, had agreed to release him from jail as he awaits trial. But the Justice Department pushed in court over the last week to keep him detained.

Howell, who sits in the Washington, DC, federal courthouse, is still considering whether Mock should stay in jail.

During a hearing on Tuesday, Howell expressed her disgust with the violence of the pro-Trump rioters.

She said she would give “serious consideration to detention” in the case of a person who came to DC to stop Congress’ certification of the presidential election and knocked police officers to the ground. She also cut into the riot as a moment that made the country shudder and made the US “a laughingstock” around the world.

The-CNN-Wire & 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Author: CNNWire

This post originally appeared on ABC13 RSS Feed

Talking Point: What's That One Switch Game You Can't Bring Yourself To Delete?

Deleting Games

I’ve finally reached the point where almost every new game I download onto my Switch gives me the same response. “There’s no room,” it says, gesturing around the virtual space cluttered with games I haven’t touched in months, or even years. “Where am I supposed to put this? Why don’t you get rid of something old?”

Listen, Nintendo Switch. You’re not my mother. And even if you were, I would tell you that you just don’t understand — all of these games are sacred to me in some way. I’m only 2/3 of the way through Luigi’s Mansion 3, and I might finish it some day! I know I haven’t finished Paper Mario: The Origami King, but I want to return to it when I’m not so annoyed about the combat! And don’t even talk to me about Breath of the Wild. As long as I don’t delete it — all 13 space-hogging gigabytes of it — there’s still the promise of more beautiful adventures in that stunning open plain.

Archive software? Or delete?

But keeping old games even when I know I won’t play them is just another type of virtual hoarding, isn’t it? It would be a little hypocritical of me to keep a bunch of gigantic games just because when, just last month, I said that Resident Evil 4 had taught me not to hold on to things. I’m a sucker for keeping things around just in case, but that rainy day never turns up. I don’t think I’ll be returning to Breath of the Wild any time soon, and if I do, I don’t think I’d mind having to start over with a new save file, anyway.

I just can't do it!

So, am I alone in keeping these games around, taking up precious space on my SD card? Why do we even do it, anyway? My theory is that deleting games (or archiving them) feels like definitively sending them into the past, turning them into memories and nostalgia. Once we’ve done that, we’re leaving that part of our lives behind us, and moving on — and admitting that life itself is moving on. By clinging to our most precious memories — represented by gigantic amounts of data, in this case — we’re refusing to move on, refusing to admit that we’ve changed, and we’re not kids any more.

Or, maybe, I’m just avoidant. It’s probably that.

But perhaps I’m not alone in this quest to refuse to pack away my toys forever! Tell me: do you have at least one Switch game that you just won’t delete, or — even worse — do you have a whole PILE of games you refuse to let go?

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Talking Point: What Are You Playing This Weekend? (June 19th)

MZM© Nintendo

E3 2021 is finally over, and we’re still digesting the ins-and-outs of all the announcements. Nintendo’s Direct presentation offered a little something for everyone, from the return of smaller-scale fan favourites to fresh peeks at Breath of the Wild 2 (no proper title yet, though), not to mention A NEW 2D METROID COMPLETELY OUT OF THE BLUE! Good times.

It’s now time to unwind a little and discuss our weekend gaming plans. A few members of the Nintendo Life team have done just that below, so feel free to give our entries a read and then join in with your own via our comment section. Enjoy!

Editor’s note: Don’t like Metroid? Bit of a washout for you this week, I’m afraid. Sorry!…

Ryan Craddock, news editor

With all the Metroid Dread hype going around – especially within the Nintendo Life team’s online chats – a few of us have realised we’d like nothing more than to revisit Metroid 1 through 4 to get ready for the big release later this year.

As such, I’m hoping to get some time with the original Metroid this weekend and will be cracking out the trusty NES Classic to do just that. I’ve never played it before and fear that it’ll crush me, so part of me wishes I had a copy of its GBA remake, Zero Mission, to give me a more gentle experience. Still, I’m looking forward to finally giving the series a fair shake!

Thomas Whitehead, deputy editor

I barely played any games over the past week, for obvious reasons, so I plan to return to Golf Story again. It’s charming, funny and extremely chilled out to play. I’m also going to pick up FAR: Lone Sails in the sale; I’ve been meaning to play it and the excellent E3 reveal of its upcoming sequel was a timely reminder.

As for whizz-bang 4K gaming I’ll try again to go back to Resident Evil: Village. It’s also possible I’ll get out the Wii U for some Metroid: Zero Mission; yes, like many others I’m planning a ‘lore run’ through the games, albeit the best version of each game.

Jon Cartwright, video producer

Nintendo released a brand new Tetris 99 theme on Friday based around Miitopia so I’ll of course have to spend a few rounds unlocking that — I’m not allowed to miss Tetris events otherwise the Tetris police come knocking.

I’m sure like others on the Nintendo Life team I’ve spent the entire week thinking about Metroid and I’m planning to replay the entire series. I actually finished the Famicom Disk System version of Metroid a few weeks ago so that’s one crossed off, suppose it’s time for Metroid II! I’ve played Samus Returns numerous times since it came out so this time I’ll give some love to the Game Boy original.

Gonçalo Lopes, reviewer

E3 2021 came and went, with no news of the New Nintendo Switch in sight or everyone’s favourite Umbra Witch. Yet what was on display already saved the second half of this year for yours truly. Quite a few gems out on the eShop this week, especially if you’re a shmup fan: MushihimeSama is the first of several quality Cave shooters finally on the way to the Switch, Seicross remains a personal Nichibutsu favourite and Rangerdog is the best Parodius Konami never made. Dunk Lords wonderful Switch conversion puts NBA Playgrounds to shame from the get go. Hope to jump back into Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity for the new DLC content while continuing The Legend of Zelda: A Link To the Past live streaming sessions.

Game of the week is Wrestling Empire. Again. Unprecedented and commendable free post-game support from the legendary Mat Dickie ensure there is never a dull moment in or outside the ring.

Gavin Lane, editor

This week I would mostly like to read the copy of Ask Iwata that’s been sitting on my desk for weeks now, and another book unrelated to video games. That would be nice.

Also, catching up on the essential pre-Dread Metroid titles, of course:

Metroid Prime Federation Force© Nintendo Life

Ollie Reynolds, reviewer

Hello folks! Hope you’re all well. So, own up… Who else is playing a bunch of Metroid games this weekend? Well, this guy definitely is! [‘Metroid’, you say? Is that some sort of Igavanialike? – Ed]

After the announcement of Metroid Dread, I’ve gone back to the GBA to play through both Metroid: Zero Mission and Metroid Fusion. Once I’m done, I’ll move onto Metroid: Samus Returns before finishing with Super Metroid. Yes, I know it’s completely out of order… I know, okay?!

Other than that, my journey through the Halo campaigns is almost at its end. I’m at the start of the divisive Halo 5: Guardians (a good game, in my opinion, just not a good Halo game), so I reckon I can polish it off this weekend. Have a good one, all!

PJ O’Reilly, reviewer

Hello. This weekend I’m gonna be blasting through a few different bits and pieces for review on Switch, including THQ’s revamped Destroy All Humans, but, if I manage to crowbar in a little chill time somewhere, I’ll be pulling out and dusting off all the old consoles and getting my emulators up and running for some retro Metroid action. I’m sure I’m not the only person planning to play through the series in chronological order in the wake of Metroid Dread’s surprise E3 reveal (and I may have got a little overexcited during that amazing trailer), I just wish the whole lot were more readily accessible on the current crop of Nintendo consoles to save me digging around in my absolute shambles of an attic.

Have a good weekend whatever you’re up to or playing!

Kate Gray, staff writer

This week I have been playing A TON of The House In Fata Morgana, and here’s a sneak preview: I just got one of the eight endings. I think it’s one of the “you messed up” endings, though, so there’s a lot more game to get through.

I’ve also been playing Subnautica for the first time, after getting scared away when it first launched because all the fish tried to eat me, and it’s pretty bloody great. Also, Chicory! I really hope Chicory comes to Switch some day!

Zion Grassl, video producer

After about 35 hours with the Paper Mario-esque Bug Fables, I finally finished off its final chapter earlier this week. So I was pretty pumped to flip through my backlog this weekend and pick something new to play, but with the way E3 swayed my heart, I’m pretty sure I just added more games to the pile. With the announcement and all of the hype surrounding Metroid Dread, I figured it’s finally time to give this series a shot!

Thankfully I already have Metroid: Samus Returns on my stack of shame, and I really haven’t played many of the other 2D Metroid games (I know, right?), so obviously I have to start with Zero Mission. I booted it up the other day and am making decent progress. However, I found out the hard way that the save battery in my cartridge is dead, so I’m keeping my GBA SP plugged in until Mother Brain bites the bullet!


As always, thanks for reading! Make sure to leave us a comment below with your gaming choices over the next few days…

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Talking Point: Why Metroid Dread Will Be Worth $60

Metroid Dread EMMI Attack© Nintendo

With the announcement of Metroid Dread, a brand new 2D entry in the 35-year-old franchise that lends its name to an entire genre, the majority of reactions we’ve seen online have been overwhelmingly positive. As you may have noted with our rather comprehensive coverage since the game’s E3 reveal, we’re definitely in the positive camp; it is, after all, a brand new 2D Metroid coming 19 years after the last brand new installment, and it looks fantastic.

We have noticed, however, a small contingent of discontented gamers (unusual, we know!) questioning not only the involvement of developer MercurySteam, Nintendo’s partners with on this project, but also Dread’s $ 60 price tag.

From our point of view, both criticisms feel very odd. MercurySteam surely passed its Metroid ‘test’ with flying colours with the incredible Metroid: Samus Returns on 3DS. We love that game — the only real issue it suffered from was a late arrival on a system very much in Switch’s shadow at the time.

And the second point regarding price? Needless to say that everyone’s entitled to their opinion, but from our perspective it’s something of a non-argument. All evidence indicates that Metroid Dread is absolutely the type of full-fat meaty release we’d expect to pay full price for.

Let’s look at just a few reasons why that’s the case…

It’s a new Metroid game, innit

Switch MetroidDread Screen 03© Nintendo

In terms of sales, Metroid certainly isn’t a marquee name that draws in millions of players — not in the way that Mario or Zelda does. It does alright for itself (the latest estimates put series sales at just over 18 million copies total), and it’s always been more popular in the West than Japan, but the phenomenal mainstream success of games like Smash Bros. and the Animal Crossing series in the last decade has only sent Metroid further down the rankings of bankable first-party IP. The games might be (mostly) great, but system-sellers they are not and historically they simply can’t compete (in worldwide sales terms) with Nintendo’s evergreen heavy hitters.

Samus Aran, however, still occupies a place in the hearts and minds of Nintendo fans, and the success of Switch gives Metroid the best chance in many years to hit the broadest possible audience. A Metroid game on Wii U would have been fantastic for the faithful few, but it would have hit a tiny subset of another subset of players who were both a) Metroid fans, and b) Wii U owners. Conversely, since the E3 reveal of Dread on Switch, we’ve had our mothers texting us asking who this Metroid dude in the orange helmet is; oh if only they’d cleared Metroid to see the truth!

It’s taken many years, but now is the perfect time to capitalise on the success of Nintendo’s latest console to grow awareness of the series itself, to put an all-time great gaming series in front of millions of new players — players who have got used to paying for quality…

Nintendo never knowingly undervalues its software

Metroid Zero Mission GBA© Nintendo Life

At the time of writing, Zelda: Breath of the Wild is on offer on Switch eShop at 33% off. Not the biggest discount in the world, certainly, but that’s still a decent chunk off a celebrated first-party game. In the past Nintendo might throw more casual players a bone occasionally — a Player’s Choice line, perhaps, or very occasionally a Captain Toad that doesn’t launch for $ 60+ — but generally it’s still a shock to see a Nintendo game on sale.

In fairness, offers on its digital catalogue are becoming more common, but despite a race to the bottom elsewhere in the industry, it famously remains one of the few companies (Activision being another) that refuses to deep-discount its software. We’re used to paying full price for Nintendo games, and only those who haven’t been paying attention would think Metroid would be any different.

Dread has been in development for years

Switch MetroidDread Screen 07© Nintendo

As longtime Metroid series producer Yoshio Sakamoto has discussed, the Metroid Dread name and ‘game concept’ first began development a whopping 15 years ago. It was shelved for a period and subsequently revived a few years ago with MercurySteam onboard following the success of Samus Returns.

Obviously, Nintendo’s R&D budget is a vague, amorphous monster fed by profit from every piece of hardware and software the company releases, but the point is that those costs must be covered. At different times over the last decade and a half, this project has soaked up resources and Nintendo will be seeking to recoup as much of that investment as possible. Like any business would. It’s looked at the game, looked at the market and chosen a price it believes the market can support. Like any company does.

2D or otherwise, it’s a new game — of course it’s $ 60

Switch MetroidDread Screen 10© Nintendo

We’ve seen comments (not the majority, it must be said) that as a 2D game, Metroid Dread simply isn’t ‘worth’ $ 60. It’s tempting to get facetious here, but let’s try and keep things classy.

Simply put, the fact that a game features a 2D perspective doesn’t mean it’s somehow ‘simpler’ or ‘easier’ to make than a game with a free-roaming 3D camera. Even sprite-based 2D platformers are built in 3D engines these days and they often perform clever tricks with perspective and focus. They’re ‘2D’ in sense that you view them from a fixed side-on angle, but they’re often nothing like the 2D sprite-based platformers of old, even if they’re designed to emulate that style.

A game of Metroid Dread’s complexity (with all its background elements, lighting, perspective changes, effects and more) isn’t ‘just’ 2D, then, and the idea that fixed-perspective games are somehow worth less is, frankly, risible. Smash Bros. is a side-on fighting game based heavily on the previous entry in a long-running series — should that not be a full price game? Would you not expect to pay $ 60 if Nintendo put out a new 2D Mario? After all, it’s only 2D, amirite?!

$ 60 is the going rate for top-tier Nintendo games. Everything we’ve seen so far suggests Metroid Dread is going to be one of those.

It’s not an indie game, it’s a new Metroid game

Switch MetroidDread Screen 04© Nintendo

Comparisons between Dread and the many indie Metroidvanias is something else we’ve seen a lot of. It’s natural to draw those comparisons, but contrasting this with something like Hollow Knight, for instance, isn’t fair or helpful in understanding why Hollow Knight is $ 15 versus Dread’s $ 60.

Nintendo knows what it’s got here; a B-tier price would suggest a B-tier game, and the company believes (quite rightly based on what we’ve seen so far) that Metroid Dread is A-game material

The bare fact is that Team Cherry (much like any indie studio looking to get attention on its game) needed to gain a foothold in a crowded market and ‘undervalued’ Hollow Knight out of the gate. If Hollow Knight had launched at, say, $ 40 — a price many players would have been happy to pay in retrospect — would it have taken off and become the word-of-mouth phenomenon it has? It’s impossible to know for sure, but we’d argue not. The barrier to entry had to be lower to attract attention and build a following.

Ignoring for a moment the contrasting overheads of a small indie studio versus a company of Nintendo’s scale, directly comparing Hollow Knight to Metroid also underplays 35 years of history, iteration, branding, hype, and sheer quality associated with the series. There’s a heritage to respect and uphold, and expectations to meet.

“Why don’t they give the Metroid series to [insert amazing indie Metroidvania dev here], then?” is a question you frequently see on forums, but this ignores the fact that whoever you give it to — whatever the size of the talented indie studio who should be handed the ‘keys’ to the franchise — a new ‘numbered’ Metroid sequel will be priced at $ 60, regardless.

Nintendo knows what it’s got here; a B-tier price would suggest a B-tier game, and the company believes (quite rightly based on what we’ve seen so far) that Metroid Dread is A-game material.


Nintendo has fallen short in the past, of course, but not only is Dread a new Metroid game, it’s a new 2D entry billed as a conclusion to a 35-year-old story arc. Metroid fans have been asking for exactly this for so long; of course they’ll pay $ 60 for it. They’ll pay much more than that if pre-orders of the Special Edition and the accompanying amiibo pack are anything to go by.

of all the games we’ve paid top dollar for over the years, the Metroid games are some of the best value investments we ever made in terms of the hours played and enjoyment derived

The value of games old and new is a huge subject that attracts all sorts of opinions. That’s fine — we’re not trying to silence that debate here — but the insinuation that 2D games, and 2D Metroid games in particular, aren’t worth paying full price for feels absurd. Don’t get us wrong, value for money is very important, but of all the games we’ve paid top dollar for over the years, the Metroid games are some of the best value investments we ever made in terms of the hours played and enjoyment derived.

And if that’s not enough for you, well, Metroid games historically hold their value well; try picking up a GBA copy of Metroid: Zero Mission for $ 60 and you’ll see what we mean. Metroid Dread is already topping Amazon’s “Best Sellers” chart, so ironically the plentiful supply of this upcoming game should keep resale prices sensible. At least once it has been released.

Regardless of how good or bad the game turns out to be, though, we have zero reason to believe $ 60 isn’t a fair asking price.

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Talking Point: Nintendo Delivered An Excellent E3 Direct For Fans Old And New

Screenshot (32)© Nintendo

The dust has settled on the E3 2021 Nintendo Direct; the big N stuck to its usual approach ever since the ‘Digital Event’ days, of approximately 40 minutes and plenty of announcements.

On this occasion, no individual game hogged the limelight to excess, as even the biggest hitters only had an assigned couple of minutes for their pitch. Considering the circumstances for game developers and publishers over the past 12-16 months, Nintendo also outlined an impressive slate of first-party titles that’ll take us to the New Year, with almost one big-hitter for every month.

Nintendo and its partners on these big games — the likes of MercurySteam and WayForward — deserve credit for lining up a batch of big-time titles

As you can see in our Nintendo Direct round-up, a lot emerged from Nintendo’s efforts at E3, and the reaction has seemingly been largely positive. In our own poll that was posed just a few hours after the event, out of over 5,500 responses (at the time of writing), 57% awarded the show either an A or B grade (39% a B), with just under a quarter opting for a C (average) and 19% opting for either a D or dreaded F, though only 4% opted for the lowest grade.

A quick glance at the ratio on the Nintendo of America YouTube video upload also shows around 43,000 upvotes to just 3,300 downvotes. While the show won’t have pleased everyone — which is impossible, ultimately — it did generally earn a good reception.

The general sense within our team is that it was a very good show, and arguably Nintendo’s finest Direct for a long time (especially with the dramatic reduction in frequency of the main showcases). After a relatively quiet time for major and exciting software, it also lines up a tantalising set of games for the coming months. Nintendo and its partners on these big games — the likes of MercurySteam and WayForward — deserve credit for lining up a batch of big-time titles under the past year’s difficult working circumstances.

Below are the big first-party games for each month coming up, and this doesn’t even include a number of much anticipated third-party games; it gives a sense of how well stacked the rest of 2021 truly is:

This was also a broadcast that delivered a few notable long-demanded fan favourites – but yes, the wait does go on for F-Zero.

After a long break since its last ‘proper’ entry (if you disregard the spin-off Game & Wario on Wii U), we finally get a return to the classic formula with WarioWare: Get It Together!, which adds co-op for good measure. Mario Party Superstars delivers shiny HD recreations of classic N64-era boards and minigames, though it’s hard to argue with those suggesting it could have been fairly priced DLC for Super Mario Party. Then there’s the WayForward-developed remaster of the two original Advance Wars GBA releases, a smart way for Nintendo to pitch the IP to new audiences while delighting older fans and longtime followers who had to watch this treasured series take a backseat when the Fire Emblem franchise — Intelligent Systems’ other turn-based tactical gem — finally attracted a mainstream audience in the West.

Metroid Dread was arguably the key announcement, though, one which topped our community poll in terms of the most exciting reveals. For newer fans there’s the buzz of a shiny 2D Metroid title on Switch, and it’s good news that MercurySteam — which developed the excellent Metroid II remake, Metroid: Samus Returns, on 3DS — is at the helm but on far more capable hardware. For older fans, however, it’s a slice of Nintendo history.

Following Metroid Fusion on GBA, the sequel Metroid Dread was well known to be in the works, going back over 15 years ago. Its cancellation and all of the intrigue and rumours at the time were a staple of the DS / Wii era, and the assumption had been made in the many years since that it’d never see the light of day (the video, above, in which Yoshio Sakamoto gives intriguing insight into the project is well worth a watch). Notably, Nintendo has given Dread ‘Metroid 5’ status, with Team Ninja-developed Metroid: Other M standing more than ever as a ‘side-project’, while the Prime series occupies its own space in the lore.

For many in our team, it’s the game that draws the most anticipation. When you combine the fact it’s a mainline 2D Metroid game with the ‘Dread’ name and all of that history, it was a huge project for Nintendo to unveil.

All of this has focused on imminent games, and of course we shouldn’t forget that the show dropped huge moments for The Legend of Zelda, too. The celebratory Game & Watch is sure to be a must have collectable, but it was the fascinating trailer for Zelda: Breath of the Wild 2 that stole the show.

It’s pleasing that the sequel seemingly has plenty of new ideas to offer. There’ll be action in the skies, portals, and sections where Link will have some pretty wild hair. Fan speculation and deconstruction of the trailer is downright fascinating and fun in itself; we’ve indulged in some theories already! The vague 2022 date is the only disappointment there, especially as it could mean ‘Holiday 2022’, but it was great to see footage and progress.

When you throw in some reveals and 2022 titles from this year’s previous Nintendo Direct and other events, such as Splatoon 3 and Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope (which was touched upon briefly here, too), the future is looking bright for major Switch releases into next year. With the hardware in its fifth year, and regardless of the neverending speculation around its successor or iteration, what Nintendo has achieved to date gives it excellent momentum. With the system still flying off shelves in impressive numbers, the E3 Direct only strengthened Nintendo’s hand in the short-to-medium term future.

E3: Mission Accomplished, we’d say.

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This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News