Tag Archives: racism

Anti-racism protesters chant ‘love football, hate racism’ outside Downing Street

More than 100 protesters chant ‘love football, hate racism’ outside Downing Street as they hold demo in support of England’s black footballers who suffered racist abuse after Euro 2020 final

  • Protesters chant and take the knee in front of Downing Street today in solidarity with England football players
  • Chants of ‘Black Lives Matter’ ring out as demonstrators raise their fists and hold anti-racism placards aloft
  • Gathered group also heard from speakers including Labour’s former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott
  • Police have arrested five men after England footballers were targeted with hundreds of offensive posts

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More than 100 protesters chanted ‘love football, hate racism’ and took the knee in front of Downing Street today in solidarity with England football players who were racially abused after the Euro 2020 final.

Chants of ‘Black Lives Matter’ also rang out in London as the gathered demonstrators raised their fists and held anti-racism placards aloft, and heard from speakers including former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott. 

Nearly a week after England’s defeat to Italy at Wembley, the Labour politician told the group: ‘The Government wants to have its cake and eat it… (Home Secretary) Priti Patel called taking the knee gesture politics.

‘I’ll tell you what gesture politics is, it’s condemning the England players throughout the tournament and then putting on an England shirt in the semi-finals.’  

Referring to England footballers’ responses on Twitter, and echoing Bjorge Lillelien’s famous commentary line in 1981, she said: ‘Boris Johnson, your boys took a hell of a beating.’ 

It comes after the Prime Minister went to the Euro 2020 semi-final wearing his Three Lions shirt with ‘Boris 10’ on the back, while Ms Patel was pictured in an England shirt with appeared to have creases on the sleeve – causing eagle-eyed social media users to claim she had taken the jersey straight out of the packaging.

Diane Abbott (centre right) with protestors during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street today

Diane Abbott (centre right) with protestors during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street this afternoon

People during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street in London this afternoon

People during a Stand Up to Racism taking the knee event outside Downing Street in London this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

This afternoon, the gathered protesters took the knee in front of Downing Street after crossing Whitehall. 

Marcus Rashford and his teammates Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sancho, who all missed penalties on Sunday, were targeted with racist abuse on social media after Sunday’s game.

Earlier this week, 19-year-old Saka told social media giants they ‘are not doing enough’ to stop racists on their platforms. 

He encouraged users to continue reporting comments to the police, but vowed not to let the negativity ‘break’ him, adding that ‘love always wins’.

The Arsenal star said: ‘To the social media platforms Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, I don’t want any child or adult to have to receive the hateful and hurtful messages that me, Marcus and Jadon have received this week. It is a sad reality that your powerful platforms are not doing enough to stop these messages.’ 

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage an anti-racism  protest against Downing Street in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage an anti-racism  protest against Downing Street in London this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott (centre) joins demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism in London this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott (centre) joins demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism in London this afternoon

A protester holds a placard as she takes part in a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group in London today

A protester holds a placard as she takes part in a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group in London today

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest outside Downing Street this afternoon as they hold placards

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest outside Downing Street this afternoon as they hold placards

Police have arrested five men after the players were targeted with hundreds of offensive posts. 

It comes as a former Metropolitan Police chief defended officers today following ugly scenes at the Euro 2020 final, but said the incident was ‘a stain on our country’s reputation’.

Hundreds of ticketless fans stormed the stadium last Sunday in an attempt to watch the historic match between England and Italy, pushing past stewards and security.

Former Met deputy assistant commissioner Andy Trotter said the behaviour was ‘disgusting’ but it was ‘simplistic’ to solely blame the police.

‘It was disgusting behaviour by fans and it does bring shame on our country,’ he told Times Radio. ‘When one reads through the accounts… there’s a whole catalogue of issues that need to be addressed.

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in a protest in London today after the England players suffered racist abuse

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in a protest in London today after the England players suffered racist abuse

Labour MP Diane Abbott joins a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

Labour MP Diane Abbott joins a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

A St. George's flag seen on the floor at the Stand Up To Racism demonstration in London this afternoon

A St. George’s flag seen on the floor at the Stand Up To Racism demonstration in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism stage a protest in London this afternoon

‘I think just to pin it on the police is a bit simplistic because quite clearly there were failings everywhere. 

‘(But) I’m not trying to defend anyone here because it was an awful, awful event and a real stain on our country’s reputation.’

Mr Trotter said features of the game, such as the 8pm kick-off time on a Sunday, had allowed fans to drink all day and become ‘insensible’.

‘Most football matches go ahead with a degree of drunkenness… but alcohol is a major, major problem,’ he said. 

Demonstrators attend a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street today as they hold placards

Demonstrators attend a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street today as they hold placards

Labour MP Diane Abbott signs a man's shirt during a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street this afternoon

Labour MP Diane Abbott signs a man’s shirt during a Stand Up to Racism rally outside Downing Street this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in the protest in London this afternoon

Demonstrators from Stand Up To Racism take part in the protest in London this afternoon

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

People take a knee during a demonstration organised by the Stand Up To Racism group outside Downing Street today

‘Those people performing last Sunday are the same ones that perform in every town centre across this country on a hot Saturday night.

‘Tonight, all over the country those same people will be out getting drunk, getting drugged up and causing huge amounts of problems.’

By July 13, 897 football-related incidents and 264 arrests had been recorded across the country in the 24-hour period surrounding the final, according to the United Kingdom Football Policing Unit. 

It took the number of football-related incidents during the tournament to 2,344, and arrests to 630.

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This post originally posted here United Kingdom News

Stand up to Racism march sees protesters take the knee at Downing Street

Around 100 protesters took the knee outside Downing Street today as slammed ‘hypocrite’ Boris Johnson over the racist abuse of England footballers after the Euros final.

The demonstrators held their fists in the air as they chanted “love football, hate racism” and “Black Lives Matter”, with speakers including former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott.

It comes after Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka received racist abuse on social media they each failed to convert penalties against Italy.

The Prime Minister and Home Secretary Priti Patel were quick to condemn the abuse, but many branded them ‘hypocrites’ who had ‘fuelled the fire’ of racism.

In a statement about the Downing Street protest, Stand Up To Racism said: “Millions of people have been outraged by the racist abuse faced by Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka following the penalty shoot out in the Euro2020 final.



Diane Abbott said the Government wanted to 'have its cake and eat it'
Diane Abbott said the Government wanted to ‘have its cake and eat it’

“The England team had shown their opposition to racism with their #TakeTheKnee throughout the competition joined by many other teams and supported by the vast majority of fans.

“But when some so called ‘supporters’ booed the team the government in the shape of Boris Johnson and Priti Patel backed the ‘right’ to boo and attacked the ‘gesture politics’ of the team.

“We want to show our solidarity with the players and call out the hypocrite in number 10.”



Protesters took the knee outside Downing Street as they slammed 'hypocrite' Boris Johnson
Protesters took the knee outside Downing Street as they slammed ‘hypocrite’ Boris Johnson

Speaking at the Downing Street protest, Labour MP Ms Abbott said: “The Government wants to have its cake and eat it… Priti Patel called taking the knee gesture politics.

“I’ll tell you what gesture politics is, it’s condemning the England players throughout the tournament and then putting on an England shirt in the semi-finals.”

Referring to England footballers’ responses on Twitter, she said: ” Boris Johnson, your boys took a hell of a beating.”



Protesters chanted 'Black Lives Matter' near No. 10
Protesters chanted ‘Black Lives Matter’ near No. 10

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Deputy Labour leader Angela Rayner and former England footballer Gary Neville also previously slammed the Prime Minister and Mrs Patel over their ‘hypocrisy’.

Mrs Rayner said: “Let me be clear. The Prime Minister and the Home Secretary gave license to the racists who booed the England players and are now racially abusing England players.

” @BorisJohnson and @pritipatel are like arsonists complaining about a fire they poured petrol on. Total hypocrites.”

Meanwhile Mr Neville accused Boris Johnson of ‘promoting’ racism in the past.

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This post originally posted here United Kingdom News

Gary Neville brands Boris a ‘liar’ as Prime Minister faces questions amid racism row

Gary Neville sends a cheeky message to Boris Johnson

At a press conference today, the Prime Minister was asked whether he and his ministers had stoked up division in the country in relation to their views on football players taking the knee. Sky News’s Beth Rigby asked the Prime Minister today: “For many people your own record undermines your image as a unifying Prime Minister. “What are you going to do to change that?”

In response, the Prime Minister rejected any allegations he had stoked division in the UK.

Commenting on social media, Gary Neville said: “Liar.”

During his press conference in Coventry today, the Prime Minister was pressed on his stance on those fans who booed England players taking the knee.

The Prime Minister insisted he always disagreed with those who booed the players.

Gary Neville

Gary Neville issued a one-word response against the PM (Image: GETTY)

Gary Neville

Gary Neville: Mr Johnson faced questions today (Image: GETTY)

He also admitted there is “still a long way to go” in ending racism in the UK.

Last month, England players took the knee against Romania and were met with boos by certain sections of the crowd in Middlesbrough.

Asked to comment on the matter, his spokesman claimed Mr johnson respects the rights of those who want to protest peacefully.

They added: “On taking the knee, specifically, the Prime Minister is more focused on action rather than gestures.

JUST IN: Fury as Campbell sides with Ardern in row over mega trade group

Gary Neville

Gary Neville called the PM a “liar” (Image: Twitter )

“We have taken action with things like the Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities and that’s what he’s focused on delivering.”

After the Euro 2020 final, three England players were racially abused across social media platforms.

Marcus Rashford, Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sancho all received vile attacks on social media following England’s loss to Italy on Sunday night.

Following the abuse the three players received, the Government has claimed it will take further action to force social media platforms to remove hate and racist abuse online.

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Gary Neville

Gary Neville: The players were booed last month (Image: GETTY)

Gary Neville

Gary Neville: Fans gather to lay cards and flags at Rashford’s mural (Image: GETTY)

The Prime Minister met with representatives from the social media giants to encourage them to do more to tackle hate online.

Under the Online Harms Bill, Ofcom will be in charge of enforcement and could issue fines of up to £18million or 10 percent of annual global turnover if social media firms do not act quick enough to remove comments.

Changes to football banning orders, introduced in 1989 to stop repeat offenders, will also come in following a 12-week consultation of the Online Harms Bill.

Four people have been arrested after the England trio suffered disgusting racial abuse on social media.

The UK Football Policing Unit said: “Following England’s defeat against Italy on Sunday a torrent of racist comments aimed at some of the team’s black players appeared on platforms including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

“A hate crime investigation is underway by the UKFPU, with a dedicated team of investigators working their way through a large number of reports from across the country.

“So far, dozens of data applications have been submitted to social media companies and four people have been arrested by local police forces.”

Chief Constable Mark Roberts, the National Police Chiefs’ Council football policing lead, said: “The racial abuse aimed at our own players following Sunday night’s game is utterly vile and has quite rightly shocked and appalled people across the country.

Gary Neville

Gary Neville: Members of the public gathered at the mural over the last few days (Image: GETTY)

“Our England team have been true role models during the tournament, conducting themselves with professionalism and dignity.

“I’m disgusted there are individuals out there who think it’s acceptable to direct such abhorrent abuse at them, or at anybody else.

“The UKFPU investigation is well under way and work continues to identify those responsible.

“We are working very closely with social media platforms, who are providing data we need to progress enquiries.”

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: UK Feed

Lawyers, Activists Converge on Indianapolis to Advocate for Dorian Murrell; Oppose Racism

www.blackrightsmatter.org

Black Lawyers for Justice/Black Rights Matter

“We must have the strongest of justice for the murder of Dorian Murrell.”

— Malik Zulu Shabazz, Esq

INDIANA, IN, USA, July 14, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Dr. Malik Zulu Shabazz, lead counsel on behalf of Black Lawyers for Justice will hold a news conference with Dorian Murrell’s family and supporters on Friday, July 16, 2021 at 1p.m. Thereafter, a meeting with city prosecutors of the case of Tyler Newby will be held at the Indianapolis Courthouse. Local activists are alleging that Murrell was killed by alleged white supremacist Tyler Newby. Dorian Murrell was struck with a bullet that pierced his heart as he was with friends near Monument Circle around 2 a.m. on May 31, 2021 while attending a George Floyd demonstration in Indianapolis. Five people were shot and three were killed, including Murrell who was unarmed.
Dorian Murrell: Killed During George Floyd Protests, Family Seeks Answers – UNICORN RIOT

Murrell’s family and supporters are incensed that Newby was given bail in this case and they are concerned that justice may elude them, as it has historically been denied African-Americans in Indiana.

Attorney Malik Z. Shabazz will address the upcoming Criminal trial of Newby, who is charged with murder. Trial is set for August 2021. According to Attorney Shabazz, Black Lawyers for Justice is in town from Washington, DC to support a vigorous and thorough prosecution of Tyler Newby. “We must have the strongest of justice for the murder of Dorian Murrell. Furthermore, BLFJ is here to conduct a formal inquiry into human and civil rights violations by the Indianapolis police department and the city of Indianapolis and the State of Indiana.” Friday’s hearing will feature a number of witnesses who will testify as well as public testimony on Black suffering in Indiana.

At 5pm July 16th there will be a Human Rights – Civil Rights Hearing on Systematic Racism in Indiana. The event will be held at Hovey Street Church – 2338 Hovey Street in Indiana.

2nd AMENDMENT/ANTI-RACISM MARCH: On July 17th there will be a national 2nd Amendment march in downtown Indianapolis and participants will gather at 2 pm at Pan Am Plaza in Indianapolis; across from the Black Expo and the Indianapolis Convention Center. The march will be open to regular civilians who are demanding better human rights in Indiana and an end to white supremacy and systematic racism in the Hoosier State. Organizers include: New Black Panther Party, PANSOC, Black Power Movement, Black Men’s Movement and a host other groups.

EVENT: Friday – July 16, 2021 – 1:00 pm
Legal News Conference: Countering White Racism and White Supremacy in Indiana – City County Building – 35 North Pennsylvania Street

Human Rights – Civil Rights Hearing on Systematic Racism – 5:00pm- 9pm
Hovey St. Church – 2338 Hovey Street

EVENT: Saturday – July 17, 2021 – 1pm
March and Rally for Black Power – Pan Am Plaza – 102 West Georgia Street

CONTACT: [email protected] 301.513.5445
MEDIA: [email protected]

Malik Z. Shabazz, Esq.
Black Lawyers for Justice
+1 301-513-5445
email us here

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This post originally posted here usnews

England’s Mings slams UK’s home secretary over racism remarks

England’s football player Tyrone Mings says Patel ‘stoked the fire’ with her comments about players taking the knee.

England’s football player Tyrone Mings has criticised Home Secretary Priti Patel, saying she had “stoked the fire” by defending fans who booed Black players taking the knee during Euro 2020 final with Italy.

Patel had previously said taking the knee was “gesture politics” and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has enthusiastically waged verbal war on so-called woke politics, had also equivocated for days over the issue.

Patel had said on Monday the online racial abuse of the three Black players – Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka – after missing penalties in the shoot-out defeat by Italy was “disgusting”, but Mings issued a stinging response.

“You don’t get to stoke the fire at the beginning of the tournament by labelling our anti-racism message as ‘Gesture Politics’ and then pretend to be disgusted when the very thing we’re campaigning against, happens,” he tweeted.

Patel had previously said taking the knee was ‘gesture politics’ [File: Hannah McKay/Reuters]

The allegation of hypocrisy levelled against the government by Mings and even some Conservative MPs is particularly dangerous for Johnson, as the England team basks in widespread sympathy after its agonising loss.

Rashford had become a hero to many inside and outside football by successfully lobbying Johnson to provide free school meals for underprivileged children during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I’m Marcus Rashford, 23-year-old black man from Withington and Wythenshawe, South Manchester. If I have nothing else I have that,” the Manchester United forward wrote on Twitter.

“I can take critique of my performance all day long, my penalty was not good enough, it should have gone in but I will never apologise for who I am and where I came from,” Rashford added.

Images on social media showed a mural honouring Rashford in Withington had been defaced before locals covered the hateful language with messages of support.

“Seeing the response in Withington had me on the verge of tears,” Rashford said, as sympathisers planned a protest at the mural later on Tuesday.

Premier League teams have taken the knee since last year following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer in the United States.

‘The painful truth’

Patel’s fellow Conservative legislator and former defence minister Johnny Mercer said: “The painful truth is that this guy (Mings) is completely right.

“Very uncomfortable with the position we Conservatives are needlessly forcing ourselves into.”

England manager Gareth Southgate said the online abuse was “unforgivable”, and team captain Harry Kane also lashed out at the trolls.

“Three lads who were brilliant all summer had the courage to step up and take a pen (penalty) when the stakes were high,” he said.

“They deserve support and backing, not the vile racist abuse they’ve had.

“If you abuse anyone on social media you’re not an England fan and we don’t want you.”

The racist attacks have also been strongly condemned by the English Football Association. Its president, Prince William, said he was “sickened” by the abuse.

‘Urgent need for action’

At a cabinet meeting, Johnson told his ministers that “the abuse was utterly disgraceful and has emerged from the dark spaces of the internet,” according to his spokesman.

He said that in his meeting later on Tuesday with representatives of social media companies, the prime minister will “reiterate the urgent need for action, ahead of tougher laws coming into force” in the UK.

The government’s planned “online harms bill” will, for the first time, bring firms such as Facebook and Twitter within the orbit of the UK’s communications regulator.

Under the bill, if social media companies fail to take down abusive content promptly, they could be fined up to £18 million ($ 25m) or 10 percent of their annual global turnover, whichever is higher.

Street artist Akse P19 repairs the mural of Manchester United striker and England player Marcus Rashford on the wall of the Coffee House Cafe on Copson Street, in Withington, Manchester [Jon Super/AP]

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This post originally posted here Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera

Racism in football: What do fans really think?

Most fans in England think racism exists in professional football but just over half think it is a serious problem, a YouGov survey shared with Sky Sports News has revealed.

Polling company YouGov conducted a study of 4,500 football fans carried out over several months across nine European countries.

Fans in England were asked at the end of March whether they thought racism existed in professional football in the country. They were asked the question again in mid-June, days after England players were initially booed by sections of the Wembley crowd before applause and cheering broke out as the team took a knee ahead of their Euro 2020 opener against Croatia.

Some 54 per cent of fans in England said racism in football is a serious issue, compared to 57 per cent back in March. More people in June (36 per cent) said racism existed in football but is not serious, compared with March (34 per cent).

The June poll was taken four weeks before Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka were targeted with racist abuse online after England’s Euro 2020 penalty shootout loss to Italy.

In the wider sample, more than nine in 10 fans in England, Wales, and Scotland (all 91 per cent) said racism remains a problem in football. That figure stood at 92 per cent among ethnically diverse football fans in Great Britain, including 79 per cent who said racism is a serious issue affecting the sport.

In both Wales and Scotland, 56 per cent of fans felt racism existed in football and is a serious problem, but fans across Europe were split on the issue. In Portugal, some 76 per cent of fans acknowledged the presence of racism but only 41 per cent said it’s a serious issue, as did 39 per cent of German fans, 38 per cent of Dutch fans, and 37 per cent of Spanish fans.

In France, some 88 per cent of supporters agreed that racism exists in the game. French fans were also the most likely on the continent (64 per cent) to say racism is a serious problem within football.

How has football reacted to the issue of racism?

Following the enormous public outcry over recent European Super League proposals, Leeds striker Patrick Bamford questioned why there was not a similar impassioned uproar from fans over various incidents of racism in the sport.

However, the survey reveals some fans take the direct opposite view to Bamford, and see the reaction from players, staff, and clubs to the issue of racism as underwhelming.

Fans were asked: Do you think the reaction of those within professional football, such as players, staff and club executives as a whole to the issue of racism in football has been an overreaction, underreaction, or about right?

Exactly half (50 per cent) of diverse ethnic fans in Britain felt the response from the sport as a whole has been an under-reaction.

This was split fairly evenly between those that thought it was major (24 per cent) and those that thought it was somewhat of an under-reaction (26 per cent).

Across all of the British supporters surveyed, the picture was slightly different. More than a third of fans in England (37 per cent), Wales and Scotland (both (36 per cent) thought professional football has reacted correctly to the issue of racism within the sport – while another 31 per cent, 30 per cent and 28 per cent respectively said there has been an under-reaction to the issue.

Fans say players taking leading role in fight against racism

Aston Villa and England defender Tyrone Mings said prior to Euro 2020 that players can act as “pioneers” in tackling racism in football, following his own experience of abuse on social media.

However, when asked, many football supporters across Europe felt players were already doing enough in the fight against racism – and that it’s fans themselves who are letting the side down.



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People have decorated the damaged mural of Marcus Rashford to show their support for the England and Manchester United forward after he received abuse following his penalty miss against Italy

In England, exactly 20 per cent thought fans were doing enough to kick racism out of the game, up five per cent from March, but just half the number of ethnically diverse fans in Britain (10 per cent) shared the same view. More than two-thirds of supporters in England (68 per cent) thought they could do more to cut out racism themselves.

Two-thirds of English football fans surveyed in June (66 per cent) felt that the players are doing enough to tackle racism, up from 53 per cent in March. More than half of fans in Wales (58 per cent), Spain (55 per cent), and the Netherlands (54 per cent) shared this sentiment, as did 49 per cent of Portuguese fans, 48 per cent of fans in Italy, and 47 per cent of Scottish fans.

Fans think clubs & associations must do better

When it comes to football clubs, fans in the Netherlands think their clubs are most effective in tackling racial abuse (50 per cent). In Britain, around two-fifths of fans feel clubs are doing enough, including 43 per cent of English and Welsh fans, and 39 per cent of Scots.

However, only a quarter of ethnically diverse supporters (27 per cent) are impressed by club efforts to deal with racism, among the least likely to think so, alongside three in 10 French football fans (30 per cent).










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England manager Gareth Southgate says the racist abuse directed at some of his players following Sunday’s defeat to Italy is unforgivable and ‘not what we stand for’

Opinions of international football associations, such as FIFA and UEFA, are also particularly low among fans in Britain (an average of 21 per cent across England, Scotland and Wales) when compared to the continent (an average of 38 per cent across the European nations surveyed).

This includes some two in five fans from Spain (45 per cent), Italy (43 per cent) and Portugal (43 per cent) who think international football groups are doing enough to tackle racism.

Are sanctions for racism harsh enough?

Many fans across Europe also think punishments dished out following incidents of racism are too lenient.

Over half of ethnically diverse fans in Britain think domestic clubs (57 per cent), national teams (59 per cent) and national football associations (59 per cent) are not punished harshly enough by leading football authorities following racist behaviour by their fans or players

Opinion is similar across England (48 per cent), Scotland (47 per cent) and Wales (47 per cent), versus some 30 per cent, 28 per cent and 20 per cent respectively that think current punishments levied against domestic clubs are about right. Just six per cent of fans in both England and Scotland, and four per cent of supporters in Wales think they are punished too harshly.

In terms of punishments against both national football teams and national football associations, fans in England (57 per cent and 61 per cent respectively), Scotland (49 per cent and 52 per cent), and Wales (54 per cent and 56 per cent) tend to think punishments are not harsh enough.

Elsewhere in Europe, fans are closely split, or lean towards thinking that punishments against these groups are about right following incidents of racism.

German fans are split 38 per cent to 39 per cent between thinking that national football teams are not punished harshly enough, and those that think that punishments are about right for example. Meanwhile, some 46 per cent of Spanish fans think current punishments against national teams are about right, compared to 39 per cent who think they are not harsh enough.

Hate won’t win



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Jenson Button, Gary Lineker, Kelly Cates, Alan Shearer, Gary Neville, Micah Richards, Gabby Logan, Ebony-Rainford-Brent, Jamie Carragher, Jermaine Jenas, Jamie Redknapp and Nasser Hussain among BBC and Sky stars united against online hate

Sky Sports is committed to making skysports.com and our channels on social media platforms a place for comment and debate that is free of abuse, hate and profanity.

For more information, please visit: www.skysports.com/againstonlinehate

If you see a reply to Sky Sports posts and/or content with an expression of hate on the basis of race, sex, colour, gender, nationality, ethnicity, disability, religion, sexuality, age or class, please copy the URL to the hateful post and screengrab it and email us here.

Kick It Out reporting racism

Online Reporting Form | Kick It Out

Kick It Out is football’s equality and inclusion organisation – working throughout the football, educational and community sectors to challenge discrimination, encourage inclusive practices and campaign for positive change.

Lewis Hamilton ‘was in tears’ as F1 star opens up on fighting racism

Lewis Hamilton has revealed that he was in tears at the Styrian Grand Prix last year as the emotions of his battle against racism in Formula One bubbled over. Hamilton has used his platform to lead the fight against discrimination and social injustice in the sport over the past year, but his noble stance has not been straightforward.

The 36-year-old has been vocal on the issue since the murder of George Floyd sparked the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020.

Hamilton has worn T-shirts supporting the movement, taken a knee before races and publicly called out some of his fellow drivers for not following his lead.

When other drivers refused to take a knee, the Briton said their “silence is complicit” with the racism the stance opposes.

The seven-time champion then also raised a fist for Black Power after winning last year’s Styrian Grand Prix in Austria.

Despite his campaigning, Hamilton won the 2020 Drivers’ Championship title, but he says his dual role took its toll.

JUST IN: George Russell explains Mercedes promise and opens up on links

Hamilton remains F1’s only black driver – a fact that goes some way to explaining why he feels so passionately about the subject.

Growing up in the sport, Hamilton was subjected to racist abuse and, while things are gradually progressing, F1 is still some way off achieving diversity.

Hamilton recently signed a new contract with Mercedes, keeping him in the sport until the end of the 2023 season at least and he says is not going to stop speaking out against racism.

“I don’t see it as a burden,” he said.

“It was definitely liberating to be able to be open and speak about things. For people to know that there’s much more to me than perhaps they realised from watching me on TV.

“I feel like I was built for this. There’s a reason it was suppressed over all that time. And if it happened any sooner I wouldn’t be ready, wouldn’t be strong enough to handle it.

“I wouldn’t be able to do my job as well and do both things at the same time.

“But now I’m equipped with the tools to do so. I look at my niece and nephew. I look at my little cousins. And I think, ‘How can I make things better for you guys and your friends?’”

Insecurity, Discrimination, Racism: The Concerns of Europeans in Britain

This week saw the last deadline for EU citizens living in the UK to legalize their stay. However, many employers do not know the mechanism and many foreigners fear discrimination, Deutsche Welle reports.

Oliver Phillips is a German citizen, but has lived and worked in England for years. On December 26, 2020, he applied for residency status. “On April 8, 2021, I received an email informing me that my application had been accepted. Finally, on April 19, 2021, a reply arrived that I could stay in England,” he said.

During these almost 4 months, as long as the procedure lasted, Phillips (his name was changed by the editors) was completely unaware of how far she had come, as there was no place where he could find out about it. During these months, he could not certify, for example, to his employer, the bank or the landlord that he was in fact entitled to remain in the United Kingdom. Many other foreigners on the Island also complain about the complicated procedure.

5.6 million EU citizens are applying for a settlement scheme that will allow them to stay in the UK. They must prove that they lived in the United Kingdom before the end of 2020.

“Another 400,000 European citizens are still waiting for their procedure to end. They have been standing for months and do not know what is happening with their candidacies,” said Mike Bonn, co-founder of the 3 Million organization, which fights for the rights of European citizens. The island after Brexit. “These people are seriously worried about what will happen to them after July 1,” he said.

Insecurity and discrimination

The British government first had to create a procedure for European citizens. Because there are no address registration services in the UK. The new system works only digitally – without an employee at the counter, without stamps or paper documents.

That creates serious problems, Bon says. Many employers are not oriented in the new system. “Even if you have such a certificate, you may not get a job. And there is often discrimination, because there is serious confusion about how exactly the new digital system works. We believe that these 400,000 people are victims not only of insecurity, but also of discrimination, “he explains.

The British government assures that anyone who submits an online application before July 1 can rest assured that it will be processed. In the last days before the deadline, thousands of applications were submitted every day.

“The British are much more racist”

Bonn sees this as a policy that is hostile to immigrants. “Whatever a minister says, the whole system in Britain is designed to set boundaries inside. Employers, universities, hospitals – they all need to check that you are legally resident in the country.” Otherwise, for example, the employer is threatened with serious fines.

Phillips realizes that along with Boris Johnson’s policies, the mood in society has changed. “In the last five years, the British have become much more racist,” he said. Oliver Phillips is happy to have received a long-term residence permit. But before his first trip abroad, he still worries – who knows if the digital inspection system will work then.

Lewis Hamilton joins social media boycott in a stand against racism and abuse

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Sport Feed

Lewis Hamilton has joined other sports, athletes and media companies this weekend, in supporting a social media boycott over the Portuguese Grand Prix weekend, to hold social platforms to account for abuse being posted online.

Football League clubs, England’s cricket board, the Lawn Tennis Association, Formula E, and Premiership Rugby have all joined to support the blackout from Friday to Monday to try and stamp out abuse.

From 3pm UK time today (Friday) until 11:59 on Monday, many including Williams driver George Russell and McLaren’s Lando Norris, will take part in the media blackout.

And seven-time world champion Hamilton, who has been working towards eradicating racism and including more diversity in motorsport, posted: “To stand in solidarity with the football community, I will be going dark on my social media channels this weekend.

“There is no place in our society for any kind of abuse, online or not, and for too long, it’s been easy, for a small few to post hate from behind their screens.

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“While a boycott might not solve this issue overnight, we have to call for change when needed, even when it seems like an almost impossible task.

“Sport has the power to unite us. Let’s not accept abuse as part of sport, but instead, let’s be the ones who make a difference for future generations.”

Hamilton has worked hard over the past year to highlight the need for diversity and inclusivity within motorsport, and has been pioneering F1’s recent pre-race anti-racism stance on the grid, whilst also attending BLM protests and pushing his own team Mercedes to do more.

When asked about the boycott, initiated by the football community, ahead of the race weekend, he was clear to state he stands against any form of abuse.

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He said: “It’s clear, and clearly in this sport, it’s clear that racism continues to be an issue.

“I think social media platforms do need to do more in order to combat this, so I’m fully supportive of the initiative.

“If me also doing it helps put pressure on those platforms to help fight against it, then for sure, I’m happy to do so.

“I’m really proud to hear that there are so many organisations getting involved.

“I’m not sure why Formula One is not part of that, but I probably will follow and support this weekend.”

The Briton also sent a message to social media companies, asking them to work harder to clamp down on abuse across their platforms.

He added: “I was subject to abuse a long, long time ago, at a time when I was younger, when I was reading social media, reading like many people do, trying to engage with people.

“But there was a period of time where I had to understand that firstly you can’t read every comment that’s on there, and you can’t take it personally.

“If you let those things get to you, then they can ruin your day.

“But I do believe that social media companies need to do more.

‘Shame it’s not like this with racism’: Premier League stars break silence on Super League as Klopp admits he knew nothing (VIDEO)

Jurgen Klopp said he was told on Sunday about Liverpool’s plans to join the European Super League (ESL), claiming his squad had copped an unfair backlash as two players spoke out strongly against the controversial proposals.

Liverpool endured a frosty reception at Leeds for their Premier League game on Monday night, where their midtable opponents wore t-shirts with slogans reading “football is for the fans” following the shock news that the Reds are one of five English clubs to break away from established competitions to form a new multi-billion dollar league.

Klopp said his players had been challenged by members of the public, and Leeds players also wore a slogan reading “earn it” – a reference to the idea that the competition will largely dispense with qualification on merit. Banners were also seen in the stands while a plane brandishing a banner flew over Elland Road.

“I heard about it for the first time yesterday,” admitted Klopp in terse post-match remarks to Sky Sports in which he also denied rumors that he will resign over the issue and said he felt responsible for the relationship the club has with its largely outraged fans.

“We got some information – it’s not a lot, to be honest. It’s a tough one. I cannot say a lot more about it because we were not involved in any processes, not the players nor me.

“We didn’t know about it. We knew since yesterday, like you, about it. I know all the talk and I don’t like it as well.

“Don’t forget that we have nothing to do with it. People should not forget that you’re dealing with human beings.”

“We are in the same situation as you: we got the information and then we had to play football. It’s not my decision. I will try to sort it somehow.”

Liverpool were held to a 1-1 draw after a late equalizer in a match that was preceded by home boss Marcelo Bielsa making a wider point about greed in society.

“It shouldn’t surprise us,” he told the BBC. “In all walks of life, the powerful look after their own and don’t worry about the rest of us.

“In the search for higher economic earnings, they forget about the rest. The powerful are more rich and the weak are poorer. It doesn’t do good to football in general.

“There are a lot of structures that should have prevented these forces from coming. Sincerely, I am not surprised because in all walks of life the same thing happens. So why wouldn’t it happen in football?”

England stalwart James Milner looked uncomfortable as he spoke about the saga but did not hold back in offering his opinion.

“I don’t like it and hopefully it doesn’t happen,” the veteran responded. “I can only imagine what’s been said about it and probably agree with most of it.

“When it broke, yesterday, was the first we heard of it. The players have no say, so the welcome we got to the ground tonight felt a bit unjust. We’re here to play football.”

The many critics of the concept, which has enlisted 12 clubs initially, would also have been buoyed by Leeds top scorer Patrick Bamford’s eloquent appraisal.

“It’s amazing, the amount of opera that comes into the game when somebody’s pockets are being hurt,” the striker smiled.

“It’s a shame it’s not like it with all the things that are going wrong at the minute, racism and stuff like that.

“We’ve just seen pretty much what everyone else has seen on Twitter and stuff. We’re like fans, really, and everybody else: talking about it, can’t believe it and we’re in shock.
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“I haven’t seen one football fan who’s happy about the decision. Without the fans, every single club would be pretty much nothing.”

Liverpool are likely to be banned from the Premier League and Champions League next season if their participation in the ESL goes ahead.

“If you thought, what could make the year worse? All that happened, the pandemic, all the injuries, other stuff and then that [the ESL] came up,” Klopp rued to 5 Live Sport. “Another challenge… but we’ll get through somehow.”
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