Tag Archives: stomach

Stomach bloating: Three common foods you should avoid or risk trapped wind

When you eat foods that are high in salt this will encourage your body to hold onto fluids.

This can result in bloating, so next time you need a snack perhaps you should ditch the crisps if you struggle with regular bloating.

Wheat

Many Brits struggle to digest wheat. If you frequently bloat after eating wheat-based products you may indicate you have coeliac disease.

This is a condition where the sufferer’s immune system attacks your own tissues when you consume gluten.

If you bloat after eating gluten, avoiding wheat-based products such as bread, cereals and pasta may be able to help.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: Health
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Stomach bloating: Low-impact exercise to improve gut health and reduce stress & symptoms

Stomach bloating is the uncomfortable condition when a person has finished with a meal, but the meal has not quite finished with them. The stomach tends to swell causing painful accompanying symptoms. Bloating is both uncomfortable and unsightly and when the condition hits, exercise can often be the last thing on your mind. However, exercise has been proven to help relieve symptoms of bloating and this low-impact exercise has proven to be best.

Reduce stress reduce bloat

Stress can negatively impact on the gut and might result in digestive symptoms such as constipation, but studies indicate our gut microbiota can help control our body and our brain’s response to stress by producing positive substances like neurotransmitters that signal to the brain all is well, said Eve Kalinik, nutritional therapist and functional medical practitioner and author of Happy Gut, Happy Mind.

She added: “Gentle yoga may help to alleviate digestive symptoms such as gas and bloating.

“The postures are one thing but essentially yoga is a breathing practice and it’s the deep belly [diaphragmatic] breathing that supports the vagus nerve and the gut/brain connection.”

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In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, yoga as a remedial therapy for irritable bowel syndrome was investigated.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation, noted the study.

It continued: “Yoga, a traditional mind-body-breath discipline, was derived from India about 3,500 BC. 

“There is a vast amount of literature available, listing the benefits of Yoga, among which, a few studies are alluded to, including IBS and yoga.”

The study concluded that yoga modality is envisioned from the cost effectiveness in managing IBS and its related comorbidities like anxiety, depression, bloating and fatigue.

A healthy weight can also help relieve digestive symptoms such as heartburn and other acid related-stomach complaints, says the NHS.

It is important to drink plenty of water before and after exercise. Dehydration can make constipation worse.

If the bloating persists however, consult your doctor. It could be a sign of a more serious condition.

According to the NHS: “Bloating, and a persistent feeling of fullness are key symptoms of ovarian cancer.”

It’s important to monitor your bloating symptoms and if persistent, speak with a healthcare professional.

Author: Jessica Knibbs
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: Health
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Stomach bloating: Condition could be caused by intestinal pseudo-obstruction – what is it

Dietary decisions are normally the culprit and solution to stomach bloating because the food and drink we consume can either clog up or facilitate the passage of items through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). However, sometimes your bloating could be caused by a condition known as intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare condition with symptoms that resemble those caused by a blockage, or obstruction, of the intestines, also called the bowel.

“However, when a health care provider examines the intestines, no blockage exists,” the NIDDK explains.

The symptoms are due to nerve or muscle problems that affect the movement of food, fluid, and air through the intestines, says the health body.

In addition to bloating and abdominal pain, other tell-tale signs of intestinal pseudo-obstruction include nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhoea.

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How to diagnose intestinal pseudo-obstruction?

Abdominal x-ray and a CT scan of the bowel

Manometry (pressure studies)

Blood tests

Biopsy

Other underlying causes of bloating

According to Harvard Health, any of these disorders can cause bloating:

Irritable bowel syndrome, a condition characterised by a combination of symptoms (bloating, cramping, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, or constipation) that last for three or more months.

Inflammatory bowel disease, an inflammation of the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the small intestine. It’s triggered by a protein called gluten that’s found in wheat, barley, and rye.

Constipation, a condition defined by fewer than three bowel movements per week, hard or dry stools, the need to strain to move the bowels, and a sense of incomplete evacuation.

Gastroparesis, a sluggish emptying of food from the stomach into the small intestine.

Cancer. Colon, ovarian, stomach, and pancreatic cancer are among the cancers that can have bloating as a symptom.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Stomach bloating: Nausea or diarrhoea may indicate a more serious disease – how to know

Causes of SIBO include:

Diets high in sugar, alcohol, and carbohydrates (which feed the bacteria)

Hypothyroidism, which can slow your metabolism and cause a build-up of bacteria in your small intestine

Low stomach acid, which leads to undigested food that feeds the bacteria

Certain medications that disrupt your microbiome, including antibiotics, birth control, acid-blocking drugs, and steroids

Stress, which messes with your digestion and causes dysbiosis

Physical obstructions in the gut that can lead to an abnormal build-up of bacteria, such as diverticula or scarring from surgeries or Crohn’s disease

Dysmotility caused by diabetes, scleroderma, or neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s, ALS, or multiple sclerosis

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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New Sony WF-1000XM4 wireless earbuds sound epic …if you can stomach the price

Sony already makes some of the best noise-cancelling wireless earbuds around, but things are about to get a whole lot better. The Japanese firm’s new WF-1000XM4 have been revealed with a new sleeker design and plenty of improvements in the sound department too. Nestled inside these mini music-makers is a newly designed 6mm driver unit that boosts the volume and helps bring a “rich and more immersive sound” to your ears, Sony claims.

Just like its previous generation of Bluetooth earbuds, Sony’s new WF-1000XM4s offer full noise-cancellation, but things are taken up a notch thanks to an improved Processor V1. The company is boasting that this new brain “delivers the industry’s highest level of noise-cancelling yet”, plus it also uses less power than its predecessor meaning they last longer.

Helping things further are newly-developed Noise Isolation Earbud Tips which provide the ultimate fit – that not only makes them more comfortable to wear but stops outside sound leaking into your ear canal. When you’re out and about the WF-1000XM4 include Adaptive Sound Control which adjusts ambient sound settings, depending on the environment around you, for the ideal listening experience.

Other audio features that are worth a mention include full compatibility with stunning High-Resolution Audio music tracks and there’s a technology inside called Digital Sound Enhancement Engine which upscales compressed digital music files in real-time to make everything sound better.

When you head into a coffee shop to buy your morning brew, the WF-1000XM4 now feature Sony’s Speak-to-Chat technology which cuts off the sound the minute the earbuds hear your voice. That means you can talk to people and hear their response without needing to take the buds out of your ears.

Quick Attention’ mode is available on the WF-1000XM4 so if you want to listen to an announcement or say something briefly, you simply place your finger over the left earbud to decrease the volume instantly and let ambient sound in.

Another nice addition is a better experience when making voice calls. Sony says that speaking hands-free with the WF-1000XM4 has been improved thanks to Precise Voice Pickup Technology with microphones and a bone-conduction sensor. Beam-forming microphones are also calibrated to only pick up sounds from your mouth, Sony says.

One of the biggest drawbacks of wireless earbuds can be battery life but Sony appears to have fixed this as well with its WF-1000XM4 offering 8-hours of playback. Once flat, the new and smaller charging case offers a total of 24-hours of music before needing a refill. There’s also another nice boost as a quick 5-minute quick charge gives you up to 60 minutes of playtime. 

As you might expect, the WF-1000XM4 are fully compatible with Alexa and Google’s Assistant plus they should survive the British weather thanks to an IPX4 water resistance rating.

They will be available this month and cost a rather hefty £250. If Sony can deliver on everything it has promised with the new tech crammed into these lightweight ‘buds, they could be worth the cash. We’ll have to get some in our ears to find out, stay tuned!

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Tech Feed

Stomach bloating: The best drink according to experts to help reduce your painful symptoms

Cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, cabbage, garden, cress, bok choy and Brussels sprouts are known to increase bloating symptoms and while they contain many essential nutrients, they also contain FODMAPS.

In healthy people, FODMAPs are absorbed through the lining of the small intestine.

When an individual has difficulty with this, as in those with IBS, excess FODMAPs pass to the large intestine, where the resident bacteria cause them to ferment.

This fermentation produces hydrogen or methane, which causes bloating.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Stomach bloating: Best gym workouts to help reduce your painful symptoms

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed

Bloating is both uncomfortable and unsightly and when the condition hits, exercise can often be the last thing on your mind. However, exercise has been proven to help relieve symptoms of bloating and with gyms finally open across the UK, what are the best workouts to help reduce your bloating symptoms?

In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, the frequency of chronic gastrointestinal distress in runners was analysed.

The study aimed to estimate the frequency of GI distress experienced by runners over 30 days and to establish the validity and reliability of a retrospective GI symptom questionnaire.

Runners (70 men, 75 women) recorded GI symptoms with a prospective journal for 30 days with their GI symptom data being collected after the 30-day period.

The study found that men and women experienced at least one GI symptom but was reduced when incorporating running.

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Cardio exercise is also an effective method according to Dr Mehmet Oz, who said: “Jumpstarting your physical activity can give your digestive system a boost and help reduce bloating.

“Rigorous cardiovascular exercise, such as running or aerobics, activates the sweat glands that release fluids that the body could be retaining.

“Even just a 15–20-minute stroll around the neighbourhood after dinner can help with digestion.”

Other recommended exercises include yoga poses. According to Rebecca Weible, yoga instructor, founder, and owner of Yo Yoga!, “When you feel bloated, the back and core muscles are going to feel really tight, because the organs are expanding.

“Stretching is going to help open things up a little bit, and it can be really relieving.”

The torso twist

According to Healthline, the torso twist increases blood flow and circulation which is exactly what a person needs when suffering with the inflated sensations.

To do the move, sit down on a mat with your legs extended and arms at your sides.

By activating your core, bend at the knees and bring your legs up toward your chest, balancing on your tailbone. Bend your elbows and bring your arms in front of your chest, palms touching each other.

Ensuring that your core is engaged, and your back and neck remain straight, begin to rotate your upper body to the left, stopping when your right elbow crosses your knees.

Return to the middle and repeat twisting to the right.

A healthy weight can also help relieve digestive symptoms such as heartburn and other acid related-stomach complaints, says the NHS.

It is important to drink plenty of water before and after exercise. Dehydration can make constipation worse.

If the bloating persists however, consult your doctor. It could be a sign of a more serious condition.

According to the NHS: “Bloating, and a persistent feeling of fullness are key symptoms of ovarian cancer.”

It’s important to monitor your bloating symptoms and if persistent, speak with a healthcare professional.

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Stomach bloating: Low FODMAP diet has been shown to help ease and reduce symptoms

Stomach bloating is typically the result of a build-up of gas in the gastrointestinal tract. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. This channel breaks down food as it is transported through the body, helping the body to absorb nutrients and flush out excess matter. There is a proven diet to help ease the bloat and reduce symptoms with experts advising sufferers to opt for a low FODMAP diet instead. What is it?

What is FODMAP?

FODMAP stands for “fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols”.

They are short-chain carbs that are resistant to digestion.

Instead of being absorbed into your bloodstream, they reach the far end of your intestine where most of your gut bacteria reside.

A list of examples of foods and drinks to eat on a low FODMAP diet are certain vegetables and fruits, lactose-free dairy, hard cheeses, meat, fish, chicken, eggs, rice, oats, quinoa, non-dairy milk, and small servings of nuts and seeds.

A list of examples of certain foods and drinks to avoid on a low FODMAP diet are some vegetables and fruits, beans, lentils, wheat, dairy products with lactose, high fructose corn syrup, and artificial sweeteners.

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One of the major aims of the low FODMAP diet is to reduce bloating by restricting short chain carbohydrates from the diet that are fermented by gut bacteria.

The fermentation process is responsible for the gas release and distension of the gut that leads to bloating, said Monash University.

The site added: “The diet should be relaxed long term to ease the burden of following the diet, but more importantly to reintroduce some FODMAPs back into the diet for their potential benefits.

“This benefit arises from the fermentation of FODMAPs by gut bacteria – the reason we restrict FODMAPs in the first place – but small amounts of FODMAPs are fuel for good bacteria and is likely to be important in long term gut health.”

Abdominal pain is a term used to refer to cramps or a dull ache in the tummy.

But this is usually short-lived and is often not serious.

But the NHS warns: “Severe abdominal pain is a greater concern.

“If it starts suddenly and unexpectedly, it should be regarded as a medical emergency, especially if the pain is concentrated in a particular area.”

How to stop bloating: 6 tips to prevent stomach bloating

Wearing skintight clothes for a huge meal out is never a good idea, and we all know why… The bloat is inevitable. Not only is it uncomfortable, but it makes a lot of people conscious of their increased stomach size and are left desperately praying for the bloating to go down.
What is bloating and why does it happen?
Bloating is when your belly feels swollen, usually after eating a hefty meal or drinking carbonated or alcoholic beverages.
Discomfort and a “stuffed” feeling of fullness are usually associated with bloating, as well as your stomach increasing in size.
It’s typically – but not always – caused by disturbances in the movement of the digestive system’s muscles or by excess gas production.
A number of serious conditions such as IBS or coeliac disease are linked to bloating, but this is in rare cases.
The result? Bloating, indigestion, pain, nausea and maybe even IBS.

Try to tackle any sources of stress, aim to eat lunch away from your desk at work, and make mealtimes a relaxing experience.

Yoga, meditation and massage can all help you unwind.

2. Enjoy an Epsom bath

Magnesium is a natural relaxant and constipation can sometimes be related to low magnesium levels.

Fill up on magnesium-rich green leafy veg, beans, and lentils, and try bathing in Epsom salts – your body can absorb the magnesium in the salts through your skin.

3. Avoid too much fibre

We’re often told to up our fibre intake if we’re suffering from digestive problems, but too much cereal fibre can actually make your symptoms worse.

Steer clear of brown bread, breakfast cereals and anything made with wholemeal flour, and choose white versions instead.

It goes against what we’ve been taught, but tweaking your diet like this has been shown to ease digestive disorders like bloating by up to 40 per cent in IBS sufferers, so it could work for you too.

Try it for three months, but if there’s no improvement make an appointment with your GP.

4. Start taking friendly bacteria

Friendly or ‘good’ bacteria supplements can aid digestion and help counteract the negative effects of bad bacteria in your gut.

Best of all, numerous studies have shown they may help ease symptoms of IBS like pain, gas and bloating.

There are many different types available, so you may need to experiment to find one that works for you.

Fancy some other supplements? Fennel has been used for centuries to help tame tummies: drink it as a tea or take a supplement.

And peppermint oil can help fight IBS symptoms like cramping or bloating – it works by relaxing the muscles of your intestines.

Try taking capsules before or during meals.

5. Check your hormonal cycle

Many women become bloated and constipated when their period is due, or if they become pregnant.

This is when you get a peak in progesterone, which tends to slow your digestion down, making everything sluggish.

Overcome any hormonal hurdles by staying active – exercise helps stimulate natural contractions in the gut – follow a healthy diet, and drink plenty of fluids

6. Stay well hydrated

It sounds obvious, but constipation – a major cause of bloating – could be triggered by something as simple as not drinking enough fluids.

This can slow your system down, and make your stool too hard to pass.

Aim to drink 1.5litres of water a day, and cut down on hydration ‘robbers’ like caffeine, alcohol, and fizzy or sugar drinks.