Tag Archives: sugars

Diabetes type 2: The many ways the feet may be affected by having high blood sugars

Diabetes type 2: The many ways the feet may be affected by having high blood sugars

Having diabetes means a person is at much greater risk of developing problems with their feet.

This is because raised blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, can damage the sensation in the feet. 

It can also affect circulation, which can lead to getting less blood supply to the feet.

Without a good blood supply, a person may have problems with cuts and sores healing, and they may also get cramps and pain in the legs or feet. 

If you don’t get these problems treated, they could lead to foot ulcers, infections and, at worst, amputations.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Diabetes type 2: Best diet to help lower your blood sugars and reduce serious health risks

Diabetes type 2: Best diet to help lower your blood sugars and reduce serious health risks

Type 2 diabetes means your body does not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Blood sugar – the main type of sugar found in blood – can inflict damage on the body if left to rise uncontrollably. The resulting damage doubles up as the first perceptible warning signs of type 2 diabetes for most people. What is the best diet to follow to help keep blood sugars healthy?

A low Glycaemic Index (GI) diet has been rated as one of the best diets to follow as it measures how carbohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar glucose.

The diet measures the rank of food according to their effect on the blood sugar levels.

The rates at which different foods raise blood sugar levels are ranked in comparison with the absorption of 50 grams of pure glucose, which is used as reference food and has a GI value of 100.

The diet was created in the early 1980s by a Canadian professor, Doctor David Jenkins.

In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, low-glycaemic index diets for type 2 diabetes were analysed. 

The study searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and clinical trials registries for published and unpublished studies up until 1 March 2019 relating to GI diets and their ability on blood sugar levels.

The results showed low-GI diets were effective at reducing glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting glucose, BMI, total cholesterol, and LDL, but had no effect on fasting insulin, triglycerides, or insulin requirements.

The reduction in fasting glucose and HbA1c was inversely correlated with body weight.

The greatest reduction in fasting blood glucose was seen in the studies of the longest duration.

“Low-GI diets may be useful for glycaemic control and may reduce body weight in people with prediabetes or diabetes,” concluded the study.

In another study with the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, glycaemic index in the diet of European outpatients with diabetes was analysed. 

The study said: “The relation of the GI to serum cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL), and fasting triacylglycerol was analysed in 2810 people with type 1 diabetes.”

It concluded that the study in European patients with type 1 diabetes showed that a lower dietary GI is related to lower Hb A(1c) concentrations, independently of fibre intake.

The consumption of bread and pasta had the biggest effect on the overall dietary GI of European outpatients.

Many people may have diabetes without even knowing it, because the signs and symptoms don’t necessarily make you feel unwell.

Common diabetes symptoms include having cuts or wounds that take longer to heal, having an unquenchable thirst, and passing more urine than normal.

You should speak to a doctor if you’re worried about the warning signs or symptoms of diabetes, or if you think you may be at risk.

Diagnosing the condition early is very important, because patients are more at risk of some deadly complications, including heart disease and strokes.

This is where one’s diet becomes crucial as it can either help or hinder the condition.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Type 2 diabetes: One of the best diets to lower blood sugars and reduce risk

Type 2 diabetes: One of the best diets to lower blood sugars and reduce risk

Type 2 diabetes means your body does not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Blood sugar – the main type of sugar found in blood – can inflict damage on the body if left to rise uncontrollably. The resulting damage doubles up as the first perceptible warning signs of type 2 diabetes for most people. Fortunately, a person can minimise their risk by following the low-GI diet. What is it?

In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, low-glycaemic index diets for type 2 diabetes were analysed. 

The study searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and clinical trials registries for published and unpublished studies up until March 1, 2019 relating to GI diets and its ability on blood sugar levels.

The results showed low-GI diets were effective at reducing glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting glucose, BMI, total cholesterol, and LDL, but had no effect on fasting insulin, triglycerides, or insulin requirements.

The reduction in fasting glucose and HbA1c was inversely correlated with body weight.

The greatest reduction in fasting blood glucose was seen in the studies of the longest duration.

“Low-GI diets may be useful for glycaemic control and may reduce body weight in people with prediabetes or diabetes,” concluded the study.

In another study with the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, glycaemic index in the diet of European outpatients with diabetes was analysed. 

The study said: “The relation of the GI to serum cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL), and fasting triacylglycerol was analysed in 2810 people with type 1 diabetes.”

It concluded that the study in European patients with type 1 diabetes showed that a lower dietary GI is related to lower Hb A(1c) concentrations, independently of fibre intake.

What is the glycaemic index in foods?

The glycaemic index (GI) indicates whether a food type raises blood glucose levels quickly, moderately or slowly.

This means it can be useful for a person living with diabetes.

Certain carbohydrates are digested and absorbed at different rates, and GI is the ranking of how quickly each carbohydrate-based food or drink impacts the blood glucose levels.

The GI index runs from 0 to 100 and usually uses pure glucose, which has a GI of around 100, as the reference.

Slowly absorbed carbohydrates have a low GI rating and foods included in this are fruits and vegetables, unsweetened milk, nuts, pulses, and some wholegrain cereals and bread.

When it comes to foods which have a low GI rating and help keep blood sugar low, avocados are one of the best.

Medical News Today said: “Polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan and avocados could help improve insulin sensitivity.”

Other foods include tuna and fish, sour cherries, leafy green vegetables, blueberries, almonds, whole grains and eggs.

Foods with a high GI and best avoided if living with type 2 diabetes include sugar and sugary foods, white bread, white rice and potatoes.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Type 2 diabetes: The sensation in your head warning your blood sugars are too high

Type 2 diabetes: The sensation in your head warning your blood sugars are too high

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. When suffering with abnormally high blood sugars, a headache may occur and could be a sign that something is not quite right.

As a result, the symptoms are often slow to appear.

Headaches are considered an early sign of hyperglycaemia.

The pain can become more severe as your condition gets worse.

Also, if a person has a history of hyperglycaemia, a headache can be a sign that you need to check your blood sugar.

A common sign of hypoglycaemia is a headache or migraine, as the Migraine Trust said: “The brain requires a continuous supply of glucose from the blood in order to function and if glucose levels drop (as in hypoglycaemia) the brain is one of the first organs affected.”

The brain not receiving enough glucose causes most of the symptoms of hypoglycaemia, which include headache, migraine, confusion, sweating, faintness and possibly hypothermia.

Having too much or too little sugar can cause problems including headaches.

This is because sugar has a direct effect on the brain and the nervous system.

For those suffering with type 2 diabetes, you can manage hyperglycaemia by eating healthy, being active, and managing stress.

Oral medications and eventually insulin is suggested to help manage hyperglycaemia.

Alcohol can raise blood sugar levels but can also cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Work with your provider to determine how much is safe to drink.

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Diabetes type 2 symptoms: Foul-smelling feet could be a sign of high blood sugars

Diabetes type 2 symptoms: Foul-smelling feet could be a sign of high blood sugars
A loss of sensation in the feet – due to high blood sugars – could disguise an open sore that may be oozing a foul-smelling discharge. This is when using your nose and sight might uncover untreated diabetes. The next time you take a good look at your feet and toes, notice if the skin is “shiny” or “smooth”, advised the charity Diabetes UK. It’s also telling if there is no hair on the big toe, or the feet, if there was hair there previously.
Do the feet look swollen? Are there any open wounds you can see but can’t feel? Is there any sensation in your foot at all?

Tingling, burning, or a dull ache can all be signs of high blood sugars.

Even if the feet have changed colour, are bizarrely cold or hot, or don’t sweat, it’s time to book an appointment with your GP.

Serious foot problems can (and do) lead to amputations if left unattended to.

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A blood test arranged by your doctor can determine if you have diabetes or not.

A diagnosis is crucial so that a diabetes support team can help you if you have the condition.

Without monitoring your health, and taking the necessary steps to get blood sugar levels under control, serious complications can occur.

“In the worst cases, diabetes can kill you,” warned Diabetes UK. “Each week diabetes causes thousands of complications like stroke, amputation, kidney failure, heart attack and heart failure.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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Diabetes type 2: High blood sugars affect the body which in turn affects sleep

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed

Diabetes type 2: High blood sugars affect the body which in turn affects sleep
Blood sugar – the main type of sugar you get from eating food – supplies the body’s cells with energy. However, consistently high levels can unleash destruction on the body. If you have type 2 diabetes, you are prone to high blood sugar levels because the main regulating force – insulin production – is impaired. This in turn can affect a person’s sleeping habits in a number of ways.

It is natural to get thirsty at various times during the day and adequate daily intake of water is very important as water is essential for many bodily functions, including regulating body temperature and removing waste.

However, if you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.

Diabetes.co.uk explains: “Increased thirst in people with diabetes can sometimes be, but certainly not always, an indication of higher-than-normal blood glucose levels.”

Having an increased thirst and drinking more water will naturally affect a person’s bedtime habits with the need to go to the toilet especially when consuming before bedtime.

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In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high, glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy.

This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger.

This sensation will also have an impact on a person’s sleeping habits as hunger is often felt later in the evening due to blood sugars naturally becoming lower in the evening.

What to do

The first step is to contact your GP if you recognise the symptoms of high blood sugar because it may result in a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, says the NHS.

“You’ll need a blood test, which you may have to go to your local health centre for if it cannot be done at your GP surgery,” explains the health body.

If you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you’ll be recommended to overhaul aspects of your lifestyle that may be contributing to high blood sugar.

There are two key components to blood sugar control including diet and exercise which can have a major effect on lowering blood sugars.

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Diabetes type 2: The eight signs found in your feet warning of high blood sugars

Diabetes type 2: The eight signs found in your feet warning of high blood sugars

Having diabetes means a person is at much greater risk of developing foot problems.

This is because raised blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, can damage the sensation in the feet. 

It can also affect circulation, which can lead to getting less blood supply to the feet.

Without a good blood supply, a person may have problems with cuts and sores healing, and they may also get cramps and pain in the legs or feet. 

If you don’t get these problems treated, they could lead to foot ulcers, infections and, at worst, amputations.

Read More

Diabetes symptoms: The seven tell-tale signs of type 2 high blood sugars

Diabetes symptoms: The seven tell-tale signs of type 2 high blood sugars

Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) also have a heightened risk, as the condition is linked to insulin resistance.

Insulin is the key hormone secreted by the pancreas when blood sugar levels increase.

The release of insulin enables the sugar in the bloodstream to be absorbed by the body’s cells to be used by energy.

However, if the body’s cells become resistant to insulin (insulin resistant) then sugar will continue to build up in the bloodstream.

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Statins side effects: Drug use could increase blood sugars increasing risk of diabetes

Statins side effects: Drug use could increase blood sugars increasing risk of diabetes

In another study published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, the effects of statin use on fasting glucose in non-diabetic individuals was analysed alongside which statins affect a person’s fasting glucose the most.

The study noted: “More adherent and intensive use of statins was significantly associated with an increase in fasting glucose of non-diabetic individuals. In subgroup analysis of individual statins, use of atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, pitavastatin and simvastatin had significant association with increase in fasting glucose.

Pravastatin, lovastatin, and fluvastatin had non-significant trend toward an increased fasting glucose.

“Our findings suggest the medication class effect of statins inducing hyperglycemia.”

How to live longer: Raspberries have anti-cancer properties and help lower blood sugars

How to live longer: Raspberries have anti-cancer properties and help lower blood sugars

Life expectancy can largely be attributed to a healthy balanced diet. Experts say you should eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day, base meals on higher fibre starchy foods, have some dairy or dairy alternative, and eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other protein. Choosing unsaturated oils and spread and eating them in small amounts is also important, alongside drinking plenty of fluids. When it comes to fruit, one in particular has numerous health benefits – so much so that it should be a staple in your fridge for those wanting to boost their longevity.

Raspberries are rich in quercetin and gallic acid, which are flavonoids linked to healthy heart function, and they provide protection against obesity.

Raspberries have also been shown to promote healthy cell life and regulate normal cell death.

Raspberries are high in several powerful antioxidant compounds, including vitamin C, quercetin and ellagic acid.

Compared to other berries, raspberries have a similar antioxidant content as strawberries, but only half as much as blackberries and a quarter as much as blueberries.

A review of animal studies suggests raspberries and raspberry extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects that may reduce your risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.

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Raspberries are also unlikely to raise blood sugar levels and are low in glycaemic index (GI).

The GI is a measure of how quickly a given food increases your blood sugar.

Though the GI for raspberries has not been determined, most berries fall into the low-glycaemic category.

Additionally, studies show raspberries may lower blood sugar and improve insulin resistance.

In animal studies, mice fed freeze-dried red raspberries alongside a high-fat diet had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance than the control group.

The raspberry-fed mice also demonstrated less evidence of fatty liver disease.

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In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, the effects of raspberries on killing stomach and colon cancer cells were further analysed.

The study noted: “Although the antioxidant capacity of raspberry extracts is important for inhibiting the proliferation of tumour cells, other characteristics of the berry extracts are responsible for a major part of their antiproliferative activity, and that the relative importance of the antioxidant effect can depend on the cell type being studied.

“The aim of this study was to assess the relative roles of low pH and high antioxidant levels in the killing of three cell types by an aqueous extract from red raspberries.

“Stomach, colon, and breast cancer cells were treated with berry extract

“A dilution of 7.5 percent ascorbic acid solution, of the same pH and slightly higher antioxidant concentration than the berry extract, killed less than 10 percent of the stomach and colon cancer cells.

“In contrast, the berry extract at this same dilution killed more than 90 percent of these cells.”

One study in 27 adults with metabolic syndrome showed that consuming a drink made of freeze-dried strawberries for eight weeks decreased “bad” LDL cholesterol by 11 percent.

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can lead to heart disease.

In addition, an 18-year study conducted by led by Dr Eric Rimm, associate professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, found women who ate the most strawberries and blueberries were 34 percent less likely to have suffered a heart attack than women who ate the least of these fruits.

Berries also have anti-cancer properties and are excellent food for the brain; there is evidence that berry consumption could help prevent cognitive decline with ageing.