Tag Archives: suing

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings is suing over the law that prohibits companies from requiring customers and employees to give documentation of Covid vaccination

(CNN) — Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings is suing Florida’s surgeon general over the state’s law that prohibits companies from requiring customers and employees to provide documentation of Covid-19 vaccination status.

According to the complaint filed Tuesday, NCLH says the lawsuit is a “last resort” because Florida had indicated it would prevent the company from “safely and soundly resuming passenger cruise operations” next month. It described the state law as an “anomalous, misguided intrusion.”

CNN has reached out to the Florida Department of Health for comment.

The NCLH complaint names Surgeon General Dr. Scott Rivkees in his capacity as “the responsible state official.”

In April, Gov. Ron DeSantis signed an executive order banning the use of Covid-19 passports in the state. The order prohibited any government entity from issuing vaccine passports and blocks businesses from requiring any such documentation.
Senate Bill 2006 was signed into law on May 3, making that executive order official. “In Florida, your personal choice regarding vaccinations will be protected and no business or government entity will be able to deny you services based on your decision,” DeSantis said.

The cruise line, though, wants documentation that all passengers and crew members have been fully vaccinated.

“The upshot places NCLH in an impossible dilemma as it prepares to set sail from Florida: NCLH will find itself either on the wrong side of health and safety and the operative federal legal framework, or else on the wrong side of Florida law,” the complaint says.

NCLH is set to resume cruises from Florida on August 15 “in a way that will be safe, sound, and consistent with governing law,” the complaint says, citing regulations set by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The risk of transmission of COVID-19 among the unvaccinated in the close quarters of cruise ships coupled with the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines in preventing the spread of COVID19 and in reducing the deaths caused by COVID-19 makes transmission of information about COVID-19 vaccines a matter of life and death,” the complaint says.

NCLH is asking the court to suspend Florida’s prohibition, according to the lawsuit, filed in US District Court for the Southern District of Florida.

In May, NCLH CEO Frank Del Rio said Florida’s law could cause the company to move its ships elsewhere.

“At the end of the day, cruise ships have motors, propellers and rudders, and God forbid we can’t operate in the state of Florida for whatever reason, then there are other states that we do operate from, and we can operate from the Caribbean for a ship that otherwise would have gone to Florida,” he said during the company’s quarterly earnings call.

The CEO described the issue over the Covid regulations as a “classic state versus federal government issue.” He added, “Lawyers believe that federal law applies.”

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. operates three cruise lines: Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises.

CNN’s Theresa Waldrop contributed to this report.

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Saving their soles: After suing over ‘Satan Shoes’, here are 5 other times Nike was forced to defend its reputation

As a multinational sportswear giant that takes a stance on social issues, while also sponsoring athletes and politically-squabbling countries, Nike has often been embroiled in controversy and forced to defend its reputation.

The latest scandal threatening to bring its name into ill-repute involves Brooklyn-based streetwear company MSCHF, which has released a limited edition run of 666 pairs of Nike Air Max ‘97 sneakers dubbed ‘Satan Shoes’, whose air bubbles are filled with red ink and “one drop of human blood” and are adorned with diabolical symbols. 

Nike has stressed it has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with the controversial footwear, and is taking MSCHF to court for potentially harming its reputation as well as copyright infringement. 
Also on rt.com Nike SUES Brooklyn company over ‘Satan Shoes’ in bid to salvage brand from critics
After the scramble to save their souls – or should be that ‘soles’ – here are five other occasions when Nike was forced to come out swinging.  

Pakistan Sweatshop Scandal

In 1996, Nike faced a backlash when Life magazine published a photo of a young boy sewing together its footballs in the Asian country. 

Its then chairman Phil Knight made a list of promises, including the minimum age to be raised to 18 for workers in shoe factories and 16 in their clothing factories. 

But an independent report in 2001, Still Waiting For Nike To Do It, found that workers were still doing excessive hours in high-pressure environments and failing to meet their children’s basic needs. 

“I think we’ve made significant strides, and I’m proud of what the company has done over the last three years,” Knight said at the time, as boycott movements raged.

“It may take a while longer, but I do think that it will be understood that Nike is a good citizen in all the countries that it operates in.”

Nike is accused of costing Brazil the 1998 World Cup

That they have still won the most World Cups of any nation is a source of immeasurable pride for Brazilians. 

But a then-fifth or sixth overall title slipped out of their reach at France ’98 when a headed brace by Zinedine Zidane handed the host nation the trophy. 

As the reigning Ballon d’Or holder, Ronaldo was on top of Planet Football. But a seizure meant he could not perform at his mercurial best. 

Edmundo would have been a better punt up front, yet instead Ronaldo was picked and it effectively meant Brazil played the French with 10 men while claims have also been made he was meant to mark Zidane. 

Gutted at being unable to retain the title, as seen in 1962 in the Pele era, conspiracy theories spread among the population in South American’s largest country that kit and Ronaldo sponsor Nike made him play.

At a congressional inquiry commission, R9 was forced to debunk them. “I only played after medical tests showed I was clinically and physically fit to do so. If the tests had showed otherwise, I would not have played,” he said. 

“The only thing Nike have asked of me is that I wear their boots.”

Colin Kaepernick takes a knee

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick first began making political statements on social media against police brutality, then started taking the knee during the American national anthem from the preseason through to the NFL 2016 regular season.

Supposedly blackballed by prospective teams as a consequence, once he and the 49ers parted ways, Nike stood by the ousted controversial figure and even had him star in an award-winning advertisement. 

Nike shares took a nosedive and products were burned in counter-protests by patriots and Trump supporters.

The company tried to release a Betsy Ross-flag pair of Air Max 1 Quick Strike Fourth of July to make amends, but Kaepernick also kicked a stink by declaring he associated the symbol with slavery.

With Kaepernick now retired to focus on activism, the row has died down. But with race relations more strained than ever in the US, and the Black Lives Matter movement still going, it could flare up at any moment once more. 
Also on rt.com Is it still about the shoes? Nike’s latest ad builds on the company’s tradition of slickly-edited propaganda & hypocrisy

Nike boots prohibited for Iran players at Russia World Cup

Again at FIFA’s flagship international football tournament, Iran’s players were barred from wearing boots in Russia. 

The action came as part of US sanctions on the Middle Eastern Country, with Nike fearful of hefty fines if it didn’t toe the line on Donald Trump’s watch. 
Also on rt.com Iran hits back after Nike refuses to supply players with boots due to US sanctions
“US sanctions mean that, as a US company, Nike cannot supply shoes to players in the Iranian national team at this time,” it said in an EPSN-published statement.

“Sanctions applicable to Nike have been in place for many years and are enforceable by law.”

The furor caused outrage among Iranians, who launched the No to Nike boycott movement as a response. 

Nike shuts down scandal-hit Oregon Project

Born in the US west coast city in 1964, Nike once ran the Oregon Project for elite long distance running but was forced to shut it down when a doping scandal involving head coach Alberto Salazar came to light.

“Nike has always tried to put the athlete and their needs at the front of all of our decisions,” began a statement, when Salazar was handed a four-year ban.

Though pointing out that there had been no discovery PEDs were used, it continued that “this situation including uninformed innuendo and unsubstantiated assertions has become an unfair burden for current OP athletes. That is exactly counter to the purpose of the team.

“We have therefore made the decision to wind down the Oregon Project to allow the athletes to focus on their training and competition needs. We will help all of our athletes in this transition as they choose the coaching set up that is right for them.”
Also on rt.com Mo Farah’s reputation is unravelling, so let’s stop tiptoeing around and hear the full story of his ties with disgraced Salazar

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‘False and damaging’: Roman Abramovich suing publishers & author after claims Putin ordered him to buy Chelsea

Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich is suing publishers HarperCollins and author Catherine Belton over “false claims” made in her book ‘Putin’s People’, which the billionaire says is causing damage to the club’s reputation.

Abramovich announced legal action on Monday against the publishers and Belton, who is the former Moscow correspondent for the Financial Times.

Belton’s book ‘Putin’s People’, published last year, includes claims from fugitive investor and Kremlin critic Sergei Pugachev that Abramovich was personally ordered by President Vladimir Putin to buy Chelsea back in 2003.

“The book contains a number of false and defamatory statements about me, including about my purchase, and the activities, of Chelsea Football Club,” read a statement from Abramovich on the London club’s website.

“Today’s action was not taken lightly. It has never been my ambition to gain a public profile and I have always been reluctant to provide commentary on any matters, including any false or misleading statements about me or Chelsea Football Club.

“However, it has become clear that the false allegations in this book are having a damaging effect, not only on my personal reputation, but also in respect of the activities of Chelsea Football Club.”

Abramovich added: “My objective has been to avoid a legal case and my legal team has engaged with the publishers to try to find an amicable resolution.

“We have provided them with detailed information addressing the various false allegations about me in the book, including the repetition of allegations that have already been held to be false in the English High Court during previous legal proceedings.

“Unfortunately, these engagements were not successful, and the publisher has not corrected the false statements in the book.”
Also on rt.com UK’s ‘The Independent’ apologizes to Roman Abramovich, pays Chelsea owner’s legal fees after parroting ‘Putin’s bag carrier’ claim
Abramovich took over as Chelsea owner from Ken Bates in the summer of 2003 and set about transforming the club’s fortunes.

The Russian businessman is said to have invested well over £1 billion ($ 1.38 billion) in the ensuing years, which have been the most successful in Chelsea’s history.

Under Abramovich’s tenure the Stamford Bridge club have won five Premier League titles, five FA Cups, the UEFA Champions League and two UEFA Europa League crowns.

“In contrast to the portrayal in the book, my ambition with Chelsea Football Club has always been to create world class teams on the pitch and to ensure the club plays a positive role in all of its communities,” Abramovich added in his statement.

“I believe our successes and activities over the years speak for themselves, including the trophies won, expansion of the Chelsea Academy, development of the Women’s team and the Chelsea Foundation becoming the largest charitable organisation within the Premier League.

“It is my hope that today’s action will not only refute the false allegations in regard to my own name, but also serve as a reminder of Chelsea’s positive footprint in the UK. I have every belief that the courts will give me a fair hearing, as they have in the past.”
Also on rt.com Absent he may be, but Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich has proved he’s as ruthless as ever with Frank Lampard sacking
Abramovich’s time as owner has not been without its problems. The 54-year-oligarch has not been seen at a Chelsea home game for more than two years, after suffering visa issues amid the fallout over the Skripal spy poisoning row between Russia and the UK.

Figures at Chelsea have frequently asserted that Abramovich remains fully committed to the club, as evidenced by the more than £200 million spending spree on new talent which the Blues owner sanctioned before the start of the current season.

Neither HarperCollins nor Belton – whose Twitter account is a steady stream of anti-Kremlin posts – have thus far responded to Abramovich’s statement.
Also on rt.com ‘I’m shocked every time’: Chelsea owner Abramovich blasts ‘evil’ antisemitism & racism, lauds ‘huge potential’ of women’s football

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