Tag Archives: tablets

Co-codamol tablets recalled: Users asked to check packaging after safety concerns

Batch number 1K10121 of a co-codamol painkiller is being recalled for safety concerns as they potentially have too little or too much of the active ingredients – codeine phosphate and paracetamol. Having too little of the ingredients causes the painkillers not to work as they should do. In addition, the lucky dip of pills may contain too much of the ingredients, which can lead to an overdose.

Current advise is “not to take any tablets from these packs given the potential risks of doing so”.

Healthcare professionals are also instructed to check their stocks and recall tablets from this batch “urgently”.

Batch 1K10121 details

  • Co-codamol 30/500 Effervescent Tablets
  • Company Name: Zentiva Pharma UK Ltd
  • PL 17780/0046
  • Batch Number: 1K10121
  • Expiry Date: December 2023
  • Pack Size: 100 tablets
  • Batch Size: 4464 packs
  • First Distributed: 05 March 2021

There are 4,464 packs under the batch number 1K10121 that are being recalled due to safety concerns.

What is co-codamol?

The NHS explained co-codamol is a mixture of paracetamol and codeine.

The medication is usually taken to treat headaches, muscular pain, migraines, and toothache.

Common side effects of co-codamol can include:

  • Constiaption
  • Nausea
  • Feeling sleepy.

Adults and children over the age of 12 are able to take co-codamol, but it’s unsuitable if you:

  • Have lung problems or breathing difficulties
  • Have a head injury
  • Have adrenal gland problems
  • Have a condition that causes fits or seizures
  • Regularly drink more than the maximum recommended amount of alcohol (14 units a week)
  • Are trying to get pregnant, are already pregnant or are breastfeeding
  • Have liver problems – you may need to take a lower dose
  • Are under 18 years old and have had your tonsils or adenoids removed because of a sleep problem called obstructive sleep apnoea.

Co-codamel comes in different strengths, from 8/500 to 30/500 – the latter being more potent.

As with the co-codamel painkiller that is currently being recalled, this strength of medication (30/500) is only available via prescription.

Thus, anybody who has been prescribed these tablets from the doctor needs to return the faulty batch 1K10121 to the pharmacy.

People who have bought co-codamel tablets at the supermarket won’t be affected by the latest safety recall.

 

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Health Feed
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New budget Amazon Fire tablets get best Windows 10 features without the hassle

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Tech Feed

Apple will launch its next iPad Pro next month, but Amazon is fighting back with its own refreshed line-up of low-cost tablets. Not only do these new Fire slates enjoy a bump in performance, but Amazon is launching a bundle that includes a laptop-style keyboard and access to Office 365 and all of its apps, such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and OneNote, for a whole year. That means you will be able to enjoy a Windows 10-style experience without the hassle of endless security updates, bug threats, and complicated menus.

If that sounds enticing, then there will be two new devices to choose from next month, including the entry-level Fire HD 10. This tablet packs a pretty impressive punch for a price of just £149.99. For your money, you’ll be treated to a 10.1-inch HD screen that’s 10 percent brighter than the previous Fire HD 10 model.

A new design makes it slimmer and lighter than previous tablets from Amazon too, and the display has also been strengthened thanks to aluminium silicate glass.

Tucked under the bonnet of the Fire HD 10 are more powerful specs with Amazon boosting that users will see faster load times and zippier performance. Other extras include 12-hours of battery life, Dolby Atmos sound and up to 1TB of storage thanks to its microSD card slot.

READ MORE: Fire TV viewers have a new way to watch some of the best British telly

Of course, being an Amazon tablet there’s hands-free access to Alexa with the chatty assistant being summoned without needing to touch the screen.

If those specs don’t excite you, it might be worth digging a little deeper in your wallet for the upgraded Fire HD 10 Plus. This tablet gets a more premium design that includes a soft-touch slate-coloured finish.

It also boasts slightly more RAM – which should help with any taxing games you want to play when you’re not busy working in those Microsoft Office apps – and adds the option to refill the battery wirelessly.

Those added features do increase the price with this model costing £30 more than the standard version and that doesn’t include the wireless charging dock which will add another £49.99 to your bill.

Prices start from £149.99 for the Fire HD 10 with the improved Fire HD 10 Plus costing £179.99. The productivity bundle which includes that keyboard case and Office 365 Personal subscription starts from £209.99.

Both tablets, Fire HD 10 and Fire HD 10 Plus will also be available from Argos, Currys PC World, John Lewis and Very.co.uk with Fire HD 10 also available through Tesco. Both new Fire HD tablets launch in May.

Xbox Cloud Gaming for Windows 10 PC and Apple Phones and Tablets Begin as Limited Beta for Xbox Game Pass Ultimate Members

Our mission at Xbox is to empower you to play the games you want with the people you want, anywhere you want. Simply put, we believe games have the power to connect humanity and it’s our mission to make gaming more accessible to people around the world.

As we shared at the end of last year, we’re bringing Xbox to more players on more devices via the cloud this year. Starting tomorrow, we’ll begin sending out invites to select Xbox Game Pass Ultimate members to start testing the Xbox Cloud Gaming limited beta for Windows 10 PCs and Apple phones and tablets via web browsers. We’re launching xbox.com/play where invitees can play over 100 Xbox Game Pass titles through Edge, Google Chrome, or Safari. Offering cloud gaming through the browser and having a simplified, universal landing page presents a great opportunity to make cloud gaming approachable to more players in more places over time.

The limited beta is our time to test and learn; we’ll send out more invites on a continuous basis to players in all 22 supported countries, evaluate feedback, continue to improve the experience, and add support for more devices. Our plan is to iterate quickly and open up to all Xbox Game Pass Ultimate members in the coming months so more people have the opportunity to play Xbox in all-new ways.

Those who receive an invite just need a compatible Bluetooth or USB-connected controller or can use custom touch controls for more than 50 games to start playing and testing. In the early stages of the beta, we’ll be focusing on fine-tuning features and creating a consistent experience across platforms, while making sure games are running their best. For more information on how to play, an updated list of supported devices, and release notes, please visit our support hub.

This is an exciting step on our journey to bring gaming to the 3 billion players around the world. Thanks so much for helping us shape cloud gaming, from the early days in Preview to today, quite simply we couldn’t have done it without you.

Catherine Gluckstein, Vice President & Head of Product, Project xCloud

This article originally appeared on Xbox Wire

Best supplements for anaemia: Do you need vitamin B12, folic acid or iron tablets?

Red blood cells are produced in the bone marrow, with vast quantities created every single day. Nutrients from food, such as iron, vitamin B12 and folate ensure the bone marrow is healthy.

Too little of these nutrients will lead to some type of anaemia, which all share general symptoms.

According to Nursing Times, there are seven warning signs of anaemia to be aware of. These are:

  • Fatigue
  • Breathlessness (dyspnoea)
  • Faintness
  • Irregular heart beats (palpitations)
  • Headache
  • Ringing in your ears (tinnitus)
  • Loss of appetite
This is an autoimmune disease that attacks the stomach’s cells that are responsible for producing intrinsic factor – a protein that binds to B12.

Normally, intrinsic factor binds with vitamin B12 so that the nutrient can be re-absorbed into the body.

When a person had pernicious anaemia, this doesn’t happen, causing a deficiency in the long term.

The body usually stores enough vitamin B12 to last up to four years, but pernicious anaemia begins in most people over the age of 60.
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Other causes of a vitamin B12 deficiency can be caused by a vegan diet, an unhealthy diet or Crohn’s disease.

Meanwhile, folate can only be stored for roughly four months inside of the body.

The water-soluble vitamin is needed in a daily diet, said the Nursing Times.

An unhealthy, unbalanced diet is a likely cause, or irritable bowel syndrome which can cause absorption issues.

Furthermore, excessive urination can cause a folate deficiency, which may be due to congestive heart failure.

The body may be more demanding for folate for any of these possible reasons:

  • Are pregnant
  • Have cancer
  • Sickle cell anaemia
  • Inflammation in the body

As for an iron deficiency, the NHS explained heavy periods, pregnancy and internal bleeding are likely culprits.

Any of these deficiencies can be identified by a blood test arranged by your GP.

Thankfully, all of these deficiencies can be corrected by taking supplements.

  • Iron deficiency – take iron supplements
  • B12 deficiency – take B12 supplements
  • Folate deficiency – take folic acid supplements

Your GP may advise you to take supplements for a specified duration if a deficiency is identified.

You will likely have a repeat blood test at a later date to check if the deficiency has been remedied.

Foods rich in iron:

  • Kidney beans
  • Edamame beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Nuts
  • Dried apricots
  • Soy bean flour

Foods rich in vitamin B12:

  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Milk
  • Cheese
  • Eggs

Food rich in folate:

  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Spring greens
  • Spinach
  • Peas
  • Chickpeas
  • Kidney beans