Tag Archives: tape

New York police officer saves man’s life by patching up chest wound with potato chips bag and tape

A NYPD officer saved the life of a man by repairing a stab wound using a potato chip bag and tape.

Officer Rodney Kennedy was dispatched to Harlem for a report on a stabbing.

LIFEGUARD 16 SAVES A WOMAN FROM DROWNING IN THE FIRST WEEK OF HER JOB

A man lying on his stomach on the sidewalk, telling Officer Kennedy that the suspect had “me in my lung” upon his arrival, told Officer Kennedy. Officer Kennedy directed one man to go to a nearby bodega and get tape and chips, while two others helped him to lay the suspect on his back.

WARNING: THIS VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT

Officer Kennedy quickly empty the bag and taped the man’s wound. This was to stop his chest cavity filling up with air.

He said, “It’s all I could do with what was available,” to paramedics while they replaced the potato chip bag with one with a better seal.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The attending physician at Harlem Hospital said Officer Kennedy’s actions saved the victim’s life, according to the NYPD.

Read more
This post originally posted here usnews

Food shop alert as YOUR supermarket bill set to soar due to EU red tape

The alarm was sounded by the British Retail Consortium, which also noted rising global food prices. Boris Johnson’s new Brexit trade deal with the EU took effect in January.

This reintroduced customs checks on the trade of many products between the bloc and Britain.

It also resulted in some checks on goods travelling from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

This move infuriated Northern Irish unionists who are demanding the inspections are scrapped.

Speaking to the Daily Telegraph, BRC chief executive Helen Dickinson said UK food prices could increase later this year.

She commented: “Global food prices are currently at their highest in seven years, shipping costs have risen threefold since 2019, and commodity prices are climbing.

“We will likely see these costs filter through in the second half of this year, and with the additional Brexit red-tape this autumn, retailers may be forced to pass on some of these costs onto their customers.”

Retail giant Marks & Spencer has reported a sharp rise in costs this year due to Brexit related red-tape.

It expects to pay between £42m and £47m in additional costs this year, versus £16 million in 2020.

READ MORE: Channel crossings – Housing delays for migrants spark fears of ‘mob unrest’

It said: “The free trade agreement with the EU means we will not incur tariffs on our core UK sales.

“However potential tariffs on part of our range exported to the EU, together with very complex administrative processes, will significantly impact our businesses in Ireland, the Czech Republic and our franchise business in France which we are actively working to mitigate.”

Whilst Britain formally quit the EU in January 2020, it remained closely tied to the bloc until the end of December, during the Brexit transition period.

During this time the UK remained part of the European Single Market.

It also continued paying into the EU’s budget and imposing many laws made in Brussels.

This ended at the close of December when Boris Johnson’s new EU trade deal came into effect.

Tensions surged in Northern Ireland over the new checks, with loyalist rioting across the province in April.

Brexit Minister Lord Frost has branded the current arrangement “unsustainable”, and is urging the EU to compromise.

The UK infuriated Brussels by unilaterally deciding it would delay implementing some of the new border checks.

In response, the EU launched legal action against Britain.

 

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: UK Feed

Overdue VHS Tape of 'Sabrina the Teenage Witch' Prompts Arrest Warrant

Author: Neil Vigdor
This post originally appeared on NYT > U.S. News

They once dotted shopping plazas in America with ubiquity, beckoning binge watchers with shelves of VHS cassettes, microwave popcorn and boxes of candy — and a reminder to “Be Kind, Rewind.”

Video rental stores, pushed closer to the brink of extinction by streaming services like Netflix and changing technology, may be a thing of the past but an overdue rental became an issue of the present for a Texas woman.

The woman, who was identified in court records as Caron Scarborough Davis, recently learned that there was a 21-year-old outstanding warrant for her arrest in Oklahoma.

Her offense?

Prosecutors said that Ms. Davis had failed to return a copy of “Sabrina the Teenage Witch,” a television sitcom that aired from 1996 to 2003. She rented the tape of episodes from a video store in Norman, Okla., in 1999, according to court documents.

She was charged with embezzlement of rented property, and a warrant was issued for her arrest in March 2000. The store where she rented the tape, Movie Place, closed in 2008, according to KOKH Fox 25 in Oklahoma.

In a charging document, prosecutors said that Ms. Davis “did willfully, unlawfully and feloniously embezzle a certain One (1) Videocassette Tape, Sabrina the Teenage Witch of the value of $ 58.59.”

Ms. Davis, 52, discovered the outstanding warrant for her arrest after she got married and tried to change her name on her driver’s license, KOKH reported on Thursday.

“I thought I was going to have a heart attack,” she said.

Ms. Davis said motor vehicle officials referred her to the district attorney’s office for Cleveland County, Okla., where a woman explained the charge against her.

“She told me it was over the VHS tape and I had to make her repeat it because I thought, ‘This is insane,’” Ms. Davis said. “This girl is kidding me, right? She wasn’t kidding.”

Ms. Davis could not be immediately reached on Sunday.

On April 21, prosecutors dropped the embezzlement charge against Ms. Davis in consideration of the “best interest of justice,” according to court documents. KOKH Fox 25 had contacted prosecutors the previous day about the charge.

Greg Mashburn, the district attorney for Cleveland, Garvin and McClain Counties in Oklahoma, did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday, nor did Tim D. Kuykendall, who was the district attorney when the warrant was issued.

Sandi Harding, the general manager of the world’s last Blockbuster video store, in Bend, Ore., said in an interview on Sunday that bringing criminal charges for an unreturned movie seemed overly punitive.

“We’ve definitely not sent out a warrant for anybody for that,” she said. “That’s a little a bit crazy to me.”

Blockbuster assesses daily late fees of 49 to 99 cents for overdue videos up to 10 days. After that, the store charges customers up to $ 19.99 to replace one of its DVDs or Blu-ray discs, Ms. Harding said.

In some cases, the store, which does not rent VHS cassettes, will refer past-due accounts for collection, she said.

“We would never charge someone $ 100 for a copy of ‘Scooby-Doo’ that they never returned,” she said.

It was not immediately clear who owned the now-shuttered video store where Ms. Davis rented the tape or whether she owed any late fees. She told KOKH Fox 25 that she had no recollection of renting the video, saying that she lived with a man at the time who had two young daughters.

“I’m thinking he went and got it and didn’t take it back or something,” she said. “I have never watched that show in my entire life — just not my cup of tea.”

Is Brexit-induced red tape going to stop UK exports to Europe? RT’s Boom Bust finds out

A recent poll conducted by the Federation of Small Businesses showed that one in four small UK exporters had to halt sales to customers in the European Union due to red tape caused by Brexit.

According to the results of the survey of over 1,400 firms, 23% of exporters have temporarily halted sales to the EU, while another 4% decided to fully stop their exports to the bloc. At the same time, one in 10 exporters are currently considering halting sales to Europe permanently. 

RT’s Boom Bust is joined by Hilary Fordwich of the British-American Business Association to discuss what it means for the struggling businesses. 

“Growing pains are big for small companies, growing pains aren’t as big for big companies,” the business developer said, adding that global firms simply have enough resources to cope with the additional red tape.

“Small businesses I think are gonna continue to feel this [for] longer than the larger corporations,” Fordwich noted.

For more stories on economy & finance visit RT’s business section

RT