Tag Archives: Trials

Brody Malone on course for Tokyo after 1st night of Olympics gymnastics trials

The Stanford star finished in the top three on four events and leads the all-around with two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak in fourth.

ST. LOUIS — Brody Malone’s rise is no fluke.

The 20-year-old NCAA and national champion surged to the lead at the U.S. Olympic Trials on Thursday night, posting an all-around score of 85.250 to make a compelling case to be on the plane to Tokyo regardless of how things go during Saturday night’s finals.

The Stanford star finished in the top three on four events, putting up the top score on high bar, tying for the best score on floor exercise while finishing second on still rings and third on parallel bars.

Shane Wiskus was second at 84.300, followed by 2017 national champion Yul Moldauer and two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak.

The all-around leader following Saturday night’s finals will automatically earn a spot on the team, with the runner-up also guaranteed a spot provided they finish in the top three in at least three events.Shane Wiskus was second at 84.300, followed by 2017 national champion Yul Moldauer and two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak.

Men’s high-performance director Brett McClure said the emphasis for the four-man team will be on the top all-arounders, and the quartet of Malone, Mikulak and Moldauer have made a pretty compelling case for themselves of the last three weeks.

Malone, Mikulak and Moldauer finished in the top three at the national championships in Fort Worth, Texas, this month. Wiskus was on his way to joining them before a nightmarish turn on high bar in the finals, when he fell three times to tumble all the way to ninth.

There were no major miscues this time around. Not by Wiskus or any of the other top contenders. Moldauer, hobbled by back spasms at nationals that cost him on pommel horse, bounced back by drilling his pommel horse set, his 14.050 the second-highest score on the event of the night.

Mikulak, a six-time national champion, lacked his usual polish on pommel horse and parallel bars. Yet he seemed far more steady than he was during the opening night at nationals three weeks ago.

While Malone, Moldauer, Mikulak and Wiskus appear to be separating themselves, the real drama heading into the weekend might be who gets the “plus-1” spot.

Penn State’s Stephen Nedoroscik, competing in his first Olympic Trials, endured a jittery start. Competing on just one event — pommel horse — Nedoroscik came off early in his set and settled for a 13.650. Not that he seemed particularly bummed about it. Nedoroscik conducted his own post-event interview with a nearby NBC camera, admitting he was “a little lost in the moment” while competing at his first trials.

Alec Yoder had no such issues on pommels. The fans in the stands near him roaring as he powered his way from side to side, Yoder let out a yell as he drills his set, his 15.050 easily the best of the night on an event that has long been a trouble spot for most Americans.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Olympic track trials: Emma Coburn wins 3,000-meter steeplechase

Jessica Ramsey won the shot put for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team, breaking the meet and her personal best.

EUGENE, Ore — The Latest on U.S. track and field Olympic trials (all times PDT):

Emma Coburn is headed to her third Olympics after winning the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the U.S. track trials.

The American recordholder in the event, Coburn finished in a meetrecord 9 minutes, 9.41 seconds.

Joining her on the Olympic team will be Courtney Frerichs, who finished second in 9:11.79 and Val Constien, who finished in 9:18.34.

Following her victory, Coburn was rushed by members of her family, all wearing “Go Emma” T-shirts. Among them was her mom Annie, who was diagnosed in late 2019 with Stage 4 cancer.

“Sharing this with my mom is everything,” she said.

The event was heartbreaking for Leah Falland, who was among the favorites and was running for a top-three finish when she fell coming off a hurdle with two laps to go and couldn’t make up ground.

“I knew I could do it,” Falland said through tears about her chances of finishing in the top three and making the Olympics. “I knew it was in there. It was kind of shocking, to be honest. I’m sorry, just really, really sad.”

Jessica Ramsey won the shot put for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team, breaking the meet and her personal best at 66 feet, 1/4 inch.

Ramsey will be joined on the Olympic team by Raven Saunders (65-6) and Ohio State’s Adelaide Aquilla (62-2 1/4).

Saunders, who competed in an Incredible Hulk mask, danced on the field upon making her second Olympic team. She also hugged Michelle Carter, the defending Olympic champion in the event. Carter could not compete after having surgery to remove a benign tumor from her ankle earlier this month.

Aquilla won the NCAA title in the shot put at Hayward just two weeks ago.

Former Oregon runner Raevyn Rogers qualified for the semifinals in the women’s 800 meters Thursday below the tower at Hayward Field that bears her image.

Rogers is in elite company: Images of Bill Bowerman, Steve Prefontaine, Ashton Eaton and Otis Davis also grace the tower that was erected as part of the renovation of the storied track stadium.

During her career at Oregon, Rogers won six NCAA and three Pac-12 titles and won the Bowerman award for the best collegiate track and field athlete in the nation. During her run the Ducks won four NCAA team titles.

On Thursday, her grandmother and her aunt got to see her larger-than-life likeness on the tower for the first time. And they also got to see Rogers run.

“What made me the most touched and so happy about it was how it affected my grandmother. My grandmother is the closest person I have to my grandpa, and my grandpa passed. So she’s a very strong figure in our family and to see her so excited, and to know that it was worth it for me coming all the way out here and only coming home twice during college. They came in and saw it today – it was the first time seeing it in person. It’s just really a heartwarming feeling.”

Teenage middle-distance runner Hobbs Kessler recently elected to turn professional and sign a deal with Adidas.

Kessler ran his first race in his new shoes during the first round of the 1,500 meters at Hayward Field. He finished in 3 minutes, 45.63 seconds to win his heat.

“It hasn’t sunk in, and I don’t know how long it will take,” Kessler said of being a professional. “It’s pretty amazing, and I’m very grateful.”

The 18-year-old Kessler from Michigan recently broke Jim Ryun’s American under-20 record with a time of 3:34.36 at the Portland Track Festival. Ryun’s mark had been on the books since 1966.

Kessler said the decision to turn pro was stressful.

“Weighed on me for a long time,” Kessler said.

In other races, sprinter Allyson Felix finished in the top three of her heat of the 200 meters to advance to the semifinals.

10:30 a.m.

Sha’Carri Richardson is out. Allyson Felix is in.

Start lists for Thursday’s 200-meter preliminaries at U.S. track trials include Felix, who has qualified for the Tokyo Games in the 400, but not Richardson, the 100-meter champion who had been qualified for the longer distance but decided not to race.

If Felix were to finish in the top three at 200 meters, she’d have to choose a distance, because the 200 and 400 will overlap on the Olympic schedule.

When asked last week about her prospects for the 200, Felix said “I think I want to have fun with it.”

“As everyone knows, I love the 200. I used to call it my baby. Now that I have a baby, I can’t do it anymore,” said the 35-year-old who had a daughter, Camryn, in 2018.

Felix has nine Olympic medals. Her only individual gold came in the 200 in 2012. She also won silvers at the distance in ‘04 and ’08, and a sliver in the 400 in 2016.

With potentially record temperatures about to reach the Pacific Northwest, parts of the U.S. track and field trials are being rescheduled to try to beat the heat.

This weekend’s 20-kilometer race walks and the women’s 10,000 and men’s 5,000-meter finals have all been moved to earlier time slots. The walks will start at 7 a.m. Saturday, two hours before originally scheduled.

The women’s 10K is now set for 10 a.m. Saturday and the men’s 5K will start at 10 a.m. Sunday. Both those races had originally been scheduled for late afternoon. The forecast high for Eugene on Saturday is 100 (37 Celsius) and for Sunday it is 107 (41 C).

After a two-day break, action at Hayward Field resumes Thursday with finals in the women’s shot put and women’s steeplechase. In that race, Emma Coburn is seeking her ninth national title and third trip to the Olympics.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Olympic track trials: Sha'Carri Richardson bows out of 200m; Felix in lineup

Allyson Felix has been added to the 200m prelims. If she qualifies for the Olympics there, she’ll have a choice to make before Tokyo.

EUGENE, Ore — The Latest on U.S. track and field Olympic trials (all times PDT):

10:30 a.m.

Sha’Carri Richardson is out. Allyson Felix is in.

Start lists for Thursday’s 200-meter preliminaries at U.S. track trials include Felix, who has qualified for the Tokyo Games in the 400, but not Richardson, the 100-meter champion who had been qualified for the longer distance but decided not to race.

If Felix were to finish in the top three at 200 meters, she’d have to choose a distance, because the 200 and 400 will overlap on the Olympic schedule.

When asked last week about her prospects for the 200, Felix said “I think I want to have fun with it.”

“As everyone knows, I love the 200. I used to call it my baby. Now that I have a baby, I can’t do it anymore,” said the 35-year-old who had a daughter, Camryn, in 2018.

Felix has nine Olympic medals. Her only individual gold came in the 200 in 2012. She also won silvers at the distance in ‘04 and ’08, and a sliver in the 400 in 2016.

With potentially record temperatures about to reach the Pacific Northwest, parts of the U.S. track and field trials are being rescheduled to try to beat the heat.

This weekend’s 20-kilometer race walks and the women’s 10,000 and men’s 5,000-meter finals have all been moved to earlier time slots. The walks will start at 7 a.m. Saturday, two hours before originally scheduled.

The women’s 10K is now set for 10 a.m. Saturday and the men’s 5K will start at 10 a.m. Sunday. Both those races had originally been scheduled for late afternoon. The forecast high for Eugene on Saturday is 100 (37 Celsius) and for Sunday it is 107 (41 C).

After a two-day break, action at Hayward Field resumes Thursday with finals in the women’s shot put and women’s steeplechase. In that race, Emma Coburn is seeking her ninth national title and third trip to the Olympics.

Also competing in preliminaries Thursday is hammer thrower Gwen Berry.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

What a comeback: Manuel wins at trials, Adrian falls short

After announcing she’d been diagnosed with overtraining syndrome, Simone Manuel punched her ticket to Tokyo with a win in the 50-meter freestyle Sunday.

OMAHA, Neb. — Simone Manuel is going back to the Olympics.

Days after revealing she was diagnosed with overtraining syndrome, Manuel brought the crowd to its feet on the final night of the U.S. Olympic swimming trials with a thrilling victory in the 50-meter freestyle Sunday.

The first Black woman to capture an individual gold medal in swimming, Manuel’s hopes were on the ropes after she failed to even qualify for the final of the 100 free, the event she won five years ago in Rio de Janeiro.

But Manuel bounced back from that disappointment to win the chaotic sprint from one end of the pool to the other in 24.29 seconds.

She edged Abbey Weitzeil, who already had locked up her spot on the team with a victory in the 100 free, by one-hundredth of a second.

While Manuel earned a trip to Tokyo, Nathan Adrian’s bid for a fourth Olympics came up short when he finished third in the men’s 50 free.

Caeleb Dressel tied his American record with another dominating performance, touching about a half-body length ahead of Michael Andrew in 21.04.

Andrew earned his third individual event at the Olympics with a time of 21.48, with Adrian next at 21.73.

Dressel hopped on the lane rope and splashed the water, while a smiling Adrian came over to congratulate the successor to Michael Phelps as America’s biggest male swimming star.

The 32-year-old Adrian beat testicular cancer and arrived at Omaha as a new father. He hoped to make his fourth Olympics, but the eight-time medalist failed to qualify for the final of the 100 free and came up just short in the 50.

The two shortest races of the trials were followed by the final event of the eight-day meet, the men’s 1,500 free.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Dressel, Ledecky romp to wins at US Olympic swim trials

Ledecky locked up her fourth event Saturday night with a dominant win in the 800-meter freestyle.

OMAHA, Neb. — The stars shined brightly on the next-to-last night of the U.S. Olympic swimming trials.

Caeleb Dressel added another event to his Tokyo program, powering to a dominating victory in the 100-meter butterfly Saturday.

Katie Ledecky blew away the field in the 800 freestyle, winning by more than 5 seconds in a race where the runner-up spot provided the only drama.

Ledecky locked up her fourth individual race at the Olympics with a time of 8 minutes, 14.62, adding to her victories in the 200, 400 and 1,500 free.

Fifteen-year-old Katie Grimes outraced veteran Haley Anderson for the expected second spot at the Olympics, knocking more than 11 seconds off her personal best to touch second in 8:20.36.

Anderson, who already made the team in marathon swimming, just missed out on a race at the Olympic pool. She finished third, 15-hundredths of a second behind the youngster.

No one was even close to Dressel as he finished the fly in 49.87 — just off his world record of 49.50 set two years ago at the world championships in Gwangju, South Korea.

Tom Shields claimed the expected second spot on the U.S. team by touching next in 51.19. Shields was an Olympian in 2016, taking gold as part of the 4×100 medley relay.

Dressel, who already made the Olympic team with a victory in the 100 freestyle, made it 2-for-2 on the night when he returned a short time later to win his heat in the semifinals of the 50 free.

Dressel is hoping to swim three individuals events in Tokyo and perhaps all four relays, giving him a chance to join Michael Phelps, Mark Spitz and Matt Biondi as the only swimmers to win seven swimming medals at the Olympics.

At the last world championships, Dressel became only the second swimmer after Phelps to win eight medals at a major international competition.

The 24-year-old Floridian captured six gold medals and two silvers, though two of those were in non-Olympic events.

With Phelps now retired, Dressel and Ledecky are expected to join ie Ledecky as the biggest American swimming stars at the Olympics.

There was a surprise in the women’s 200 backstroke. Favorite Regan Smith, who has already won the 100 back, faded to third in the longer race to miss out on a second individual event in Tokyo.

Rhyan White took the victory in 2:05.73, with Phoebe Bacon claiming the likely second spot in 2:06.46.

Smith finished third in 2:06.79, more than 3 seconds off her personal best.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Sha'Carri Richardson notches colorful win at Olympic trials

Even with a slow start, Richardson still finished three body lengths ahead of second place Saturday.

EUGENE, Ore. — Whether watching from Jamaica, Japan or the U.S, it was hard to miss that shock of flowing, orange hair that came streaking across the finish line first in Eugene on Saturday night.

It belongs to Sha’Carri Richardson. And after the eye-opening show she put on at Olympic trials — blowing away the field in the 100-meter semis in a wind-aided 10.64 seconds, then again in the final in 10.86 — she figures to grab her fair share of attention next month in Tokyo.

With her performance, the 21-year-old out of LSU picked up a spot in the Olympics and a national title while also setting up a possible showdown with the Jamaican world champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.

An over-the-limit tailwind prevented the 10.64 from becoming official and leaving Richardson only 0.01 behind Fraser-Pryce’s top time of 2021. But the season is far from over. The world record of 10.49 was set by Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

“She carries such a firecracker,” said Richardson’s training partner, Justin Gatlin. “She’s capable of running 10.6. I’ve seen her at practice, and she’s capable of running 10.5, actually. She can definitely shock the world.”

Richardson overcame a slow start to pass Javianne Oliver, who started in the lane next to her, and beat her by three body lengths and 0.13 seconds. Teahna Daniels finished third.

About the only question surrounding Richardson this week was what color hair she’d bring to the starting line. Style is part of her game. She says she’s proud to sport long nails, too, just like one of her idols — Griffith Joyner.

While Richardson’s blazing speed made her close to a sure thing in the women’s 100, the men’s sprint is nowhere near as settled.

The race for the three Olympic spots in their crowded 100 could be the best battle of the meet. They ran their qualifying heat Saturday, and all the “big” names made it through. That now includes Fred Kerley, whose main distance is the 400 meters but who made the 100 more interesting when, on the heels of a 9.91 earlier this season, he decided to be a short sprinter for this Olympic cycle.

“The bigger plan is still 400 meters for the next coming years,” Kerley said. “Right now, I’m focusing on getting everything correct and getting up my speed up so I can make history.”

He made it through his heat, and now Gatlin (the former Olympic and world champion) and Trayvon Bromell (this year’s world leader at 9.77), and star-in-the-making Noah Lyles, whose chances are more secure in the 200, have something to worry about as they approach Sunday’s finals.

Or maybe not.

“Everything is in preparation for the 200 as far as I’m concerned,” said Lyles, the world champion at 200 meters, in his strongest indicator yet of where his mind really rests for this meet.

That packed field does not include the reigning world champion, Christian Coleman, who is banned this year because of a doping violation that stemmed from a series of missed tests and a failed appeal to have the suspension overturned.

Coleman’s fate is sealed. Defending Olympic champion hurdler Brianna McNeal’s is not. She, too, has an appeal on a whereabouts case pending, but international officials are letting her run here while the case is decided.

“I want to cry right now,” she said after winning her qualifying heat in the 100 hurdles. “You guys don’t understand how much I’ve been going through this year. I’m just very emotional.”

In Saturday’s only other final, Valarie Allman won the discus throw to make the Olympic team, while in the women’s 400 semis, Allyson Felix stayed on track to make her fifth team by qualifying for Sunday’s final.

Richardson will be a first-timer, poised to square off with Fraser-Pryce, who has six Olympic medals, including the gold in the 100 in both 2008 and 2012. Jamaica’s Olympic qualifying is next weekend, though nobody’s doubting Fraser-Pryce — aka “The Pocket Rocket” — will skate through.

The 34-year-old mom has also been known to bring out brightly colored hair styles for her biggest events. Looks like she’ll have competition from Richardson on that front, too.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Olympic trials begin without Shelby Houlihan after emergency injunction denied

American record holder Shelby Houlihan’s request for an emergency injunction was turned down Friday following her 4-year-ban for nandrolone.

EUGENE, Ore — Shelby Houlihan’s quest to overturn her doping suspension in time to run at this year’s Olympic trials is over. Houlihan’s request for an emergency injunction from Switzerland’s highest court was turned down Friday because the court didn’t have the original decision to reference in order to make its own judgment.

The Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport announced earlier this week it had banned Houlihan for four years after international testers found traces of the performance enhancer nandrolone in her system.

Houlihan, who finished fourth at world championships last year in the 1,500 and holds the American record at both 1,500 and 5,000 meters, says the positive test came because she ate a pork burrito hours before the test. There are many examples in recent years of tainted meat causing positives.

Houlihan had been entered in Friday’s preliminaries for both distances at Olympic trials, but her name was removed before the races started.

She offered an update on the case on social media.

“I want to be clear that, contrary to media reports, I never had any intention of competing if this injunction wasn’t granted,” she said. “If I was going to race, it was going to be the right way. I respect the sport and my competitors too much.”

Her uncertain status for the races threw the day leading into the start of trials into chaos.

USA Track and Field announced early Thursday that Houlihan would be allowed to run until she had exhausted all her appeals, which presumably included an appeal to the Swiss court. That brought a backlash from athletes and others who asked why an athlete who had received a ban from CAS, the ultimate authority in the sports world, was being allowed to race.

USATF and the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee came back later in the day and said they would adhere to all antidoping rules. USATF explained that it didn’t receive official notice of Houlihan’s ban until late in the day, and therefore hadn’t been in position to remove her from the lineup.

Meantime, Houlihan’s team sent its appeal into the Swiss high court, asking for an injunction. While that request was denied, Houlihan said she would pursue the appeal once CAS issues its full decision.

“I am told that appeals of this kind are difficult to win, but I continue to believe that the truth will prevail,” she said.

In a social media post, and a video news conference earlier in the week, Houlihan and her attorney gave a detailed explanation of their case — including the existence of hair samples that offered no evidence of long-term buildup of nandrolone and a food log that showed she ate the burrito hours before the test.

“I can’t begin to find the words to express how disheartening this is,” she said in Friday’s post on Instagram. “It absolutely breaks my heart to have my dreams and career taken away for something I did not do.”

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Olympic champ Tony Ervin fails to advance at US swim trials

Ervin made history in 2016 as the oldest individual swimming champion in Olympic history.

OMAHA, Neb. — Reigning Olympic champion Tony Ervin failed to advance from the preliminaries of the 50-meter freestyle at the U.S. swimming trials Saturday.

Ervin, who went by Anthony when he won gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics, returned for one more trials at age 40 knowing he had little chance of earning a spot on the team.

He merely wanted to get as far as the final, with hopes of passing the baton to the next generation of sprinters. But Ervin managed only the 23rd-fastest time in the morning heats at 22.61 seconds — 1.21 off his winning time five years ago.

The top 16 advanced to the evening semifinals.

Ervin was a two-time gold medalist in the 50 free, tying for the top spot at the 2000 Sydney Games before improbably returning 16 years later to claim another gold at 35 — the oldest individual swimming champion in Olympic history.

Caeleb Dressel was top qualifier at 21.29, while eight-time Olympic medalist Nathan Adrian shook off a disappointing performance in the 100 free to post the third-fastest time (21.85).

The 32-year-old Adrian must finish in the top two of the 50 to make his fourth Olympics team.

In another bounce-back performance, Simone Manuel was second-fastest in the preliminaries of the women’s 50 free at 24.56.

The 2016 Olympic champion in the 100 free stunningly failed to make it past the semifinals in that event, revealing afterward that she had been diagnosed with overtraining syndrome.

Like Adrian, Manuel’s only hope of making it back to the Olympics is to finish in the top two of the 50.

Abbey Weitzeil, who won the 100 free Friday night, was fastest in the 50 free prelims at 24.50.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

World record shattered on Day 1 of US Olympic Track and Field trials

A 31-year-old world record was crushed Friday night as the first American track and field Olympians learned they were headed to Tokyo.

EUGENE, Ore — The record was older than he is.

When Ryan Crouser broke it, “it felt like it was a huge weight lifted.”

The 28-year-old who built a training ring at his home in Arkansas to stay on point during the coronavirus pandemic shattered a shot put world record Friday night that was set 2 1/2 years before he was born.

On Day 1 of U.S. Olympic Trials, he heaved the massive medal sphere 76 feet, 8 1/4 inches (23.37 meters) to put his name in the record book and punch his ticket for Tokyo, where he’ll have a chance to defend his Olympic title next month.

Just like he always imagined.

“There were so many times that I was throwing a six-pound shot out behind the middle school, throwing by myself, and let it go and put my hands over my head and be like, ‘Oh, new world record!’” Crouser said. “I knew it’s been a possibility or potential to do it since 2017.”

Virtually everyone in this tightly knit group of throwers knew the record of 75-10 1/4 (23.12) held by Randy Barnes since May 20, 1990, was in jeopardy. Earlier this year, Crouser topped Barnes’ indoor record. Earlier on Friday, during qualifying, Crouser heaved 75-2 1/2 (22.92) to set the American Olympic trials record.

Crouser was feeling so good in the preliminary round that he thought a world record was possible right then and there. What kept him from going for it was his shoes. Though he had brought a pair of new Nikes to Eugene for the trials, he opted for a more broken-in pair because the shot put ring at newly remodeled Hayward Field was “fast.”

“But they take your shoes if you break the world record,” Crouser said of World Athletics, which tests all shoes involved in a record. “I thought, ‘I don’t know, if I throw a world record in prelims, I won’t have shoes for the final. I’ll have to throw in the (new) Nikes.’”

So, the record held — but only for a few more hours.

Even before the fourth of his six tries on a mild, sunshiny evening had plunked into the dirt, Crouser was lifting his arms to celebrate. When the shot landed, far beyond where any other mark had been made, a collective gasp came from the quarter-filled stands.

About a half-minute passed while officials checked the distance. When the mark came up on the board, confirming that he had broken one of the longest-standing records in the books, he was mobbed by his competitors near the ring.

“Finally timed that one up,” said Crouser, who grew up in Oregon, went to college at Texas and now serves as a volunteer coach at Arkansas.. “I think I was celebrating on that one almost before it left my hand.”

Among those congratulating him were world champion Joe Kovacs, who finished second, and Payton Otterdahl, who earned the third spot.

“There are three or four guys capable of doing that,” Kovacs said. “In Tokyo, there are going to be some fireworks. Every year, we’re talking about the records being broken and I think there’s more to come.”

Several minutes after his record, Crouser was proudly posing on the field. The picture: Him standing next to the scoreboard with both thumbs raised and the words “World Record” highlighted in green on the board next to his new record.

Shot putters fashion themselves as part-time physics gurus. They spend hours analyzing their throws from multiple angles, all in the hopes of eking out a few more centimeters.

About the dynamics of his best-ever throw, Crouser said: “I stayed big with my chest and relaxed and let the entry happen. I didn’t force it. And once I did that well, I knew the throw was going to be good, so I didn’t do anything to mess it up from there.”

Crouser, who finished second to Kovacs at world championships in Doha in 2019, didn’t miss a day of training in 2020, even with the coronavirus pandemic shutting things down across the globe. He built a homemade shot-put ring that he constructed out of two sheets of plywood and screws from Home Depot.

The opening day of trials also featured strong first-round performances from world 800-meter champion Donavan Brazier and sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson, who chose orange as the hair color of the day and turned in the fastest 100-meter time (10.84 seconds). High jumper Vashti Cunningham — the daughter of former NFL quarterback Randall Cunningham — easily qualified for the final and discus thrower Valarie Allman set a meet record with her throw of 229- 8 (70.01) in qualifying.

In the night’s other final, Woody Kincaid sprinted the final stretch to hold off Grant Fisher and win the 10,000 meters. Both run for the Bowerman Track Club. Kincaid finished in 27:53.62. Joe Klecker was third.

All received second billing to Crouser.

He’s hard to miss at a track meet. The 320-pounder takes down about 5,000 calories a day to keep weight on his 6-7 frame. His diet consists of two big breakfast burritos in the morning, a pound of ground beef for lunch and three of the four portions from a meal delivery service at night.

So, what does a newly minted world-record holder do for dinner? Well, options figured to be limited at the late hour he would get out of the track.

“I’ll probably go for a big, old double-double hamburger somewhere,” he said.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

US Track reverses course, removes Shelby Houlihan from Olympic trials

It appeared Houlihan, who tested positive for a banned substance, would be allowed to compete Friday. USA Track and Field has since reversed that decision.

EUGENE, Ore — The odds of banned runner Shelby Houlihan running at U.S. Olympic trials diminished sharply late Thursday when the country’s Olympic committee said it would follow all antidoping rules and USA Track and Field received long-awaited official notice of her suspension.

The developments capped a whirlwind day that began with USATF saying it would not bar the American record-holder at 1,500 and 5,000 meters from running in Friday’s preliminary heats until she had exhausted every appeal.

USATF stood by that premise at the end of the day, as well, but said it was comfortable taking Houlihan off the start lists since it had received official word from the Athletics Integrity Unit, which conducted the test that led to the suspension, that Houlihan had been banned for four years.

“Process is important, particularly when individuals’ careers and lives are at stake,” USATF CEO Max Siegel said. “The letter from the AIU, received tonight, formally notifying us of the consequences of the decision is welcomed and, in line with our processes, we will act accordingly.”

Earlier this week, the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld Houlihan’s four-year ban for testing positive for trace amounts of the performance enhancer nandrolone.

RELATED: Runner failed to prove banned substance came from burrito, sport’s court says

RELATED: American record holder Shelby Houlihan receives 4-year ban a week before Olympic track trials

She blamed her positive test on a pork burrito she ate 10 hours before a test in December. Contaminated meats have led to positive tests in other cases, many of which have been dismissed. But Houlihan did not receive any leniency, and her ban would keep her out of the upcoming Olympics and the 2024 Games.

There remains a sliver of hope for Houlihan, but it is very slim. The 28-year-old would have to appeal to and receive fast-track relief from Switzerland’s highest federal court to conceivably be put back in the races.

Her representatives remained quiet about their plans.

But victories in sports cases at the Swiss tribunal are extremely rare, and barring that sort of last-minute reprieve, Houlihan is considered suspended and ineligible to race under international antidoping rules.

“The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, together with USATF, can confirm that we will adhere to the (international antidoping) code and any CAS decisions that govern athlete participation in sanctioned events,” USOPC CEO Sarah Hirshland said late Thursday.

Though USATF runs the Olympic trials, the USOPC has ultimate say on its rules and who it places on the Olympic team.

Houlihan began the day on the start list for both races, which led to phones ringing off the hook at USATF, USOPC, World Athletics and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The main question: Why was the runner, who shared news of her suspension earlier in the week on social media, still on the start list?

“Despite how frustrated people might be with the CAS decision, she is serving a sanction,” USADA CEO Travis Tygart said. “Under the rules, she’s not allowed to compete. It would be illegal for her to do so, unless a court orders differently.”

And so, with only hours to go until the races begin, Houlihan’s slim chances of staying eligible rested on her filing an appeal to the Swiss federal court, and the court issuing an injunction that would allow her to compete while it decides whether to take the case.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports