Tag Archives: Trials

Shocking: Simone Manuel fails to make the final in 100 freestyle at Olympic trials

One of the top stars of the 2016 Rio Olympics for Team USA still has a chance to qualify for Tokyo games in the 50-meter freestyle.

OMAHA, Neb. — Caeleb Dressel locked up his spot for Tokyo, where he’s expected to be one of the biggest stars in the Olympic pool.

Simone Manuel got left behind.

In the biggest surprise yet at the U.S. swimming trials, the defending Olympic women’s champion in the 100-meter freestyle failed to advance from the semifinals Thursday night.

Manuel, who tied for the gold at the Rio Olympics to become the first Black female ever to win an individual swimming event, finished fourth in the first semifinal heat at 54.17 seconds.

She just missed a spot in Friday night’s final when five swimmers went faster in the second semifinal heat, with Erika Brown taking the eighth spot in 54.15 — two-hundredths faster than Manuel.

“I’m an Olympic champion,” a tearful Manuel said, seeking solace in her 2016 accomplishments. “It’s still a tough pill to swallow.”

There were no such concerns for Dressel, who romped to victory in the men’s 100 free in 47.39.

He finally got a chance to shine on Day 5 of the trials after a long week of waiting. When Dressel saw a “1” beside his name, he hopped on the lane rope, splashed the water and pumped his arms to whip up the crowd.

“It’s a huge weight off my shoulders,” Dressel said. “I’m excited to get the job done and move forward.”

In the wake of Michael Phelps’ retirement, Dressel has emerged as the next big thing in men’s swimming. After winning two golds medals at the 2016 Rio Games, he really shined at the last two world championships.

In 2017, Dressel captured seven gold medals in Budapest — joining Phelps and Mark Spitz as the only swimmers to win that many races at a major international meet.

Dressel followed up with six golds and two silvers at the 2019 championships in Gwangju, becoming only the second swimmer to take as many as eight medals after Phelps.

A giant picture of Dressel adorns the outside of the downtown Omaha arena where the trials are being held.

“All the fluff that comes with it, your name on the building, is cool,” he said. “But it adds a little bit different pressure to it.”

While Dressel isn’t expected to swim enough events in Tokyo to challenge Phelps’ record of eight golds from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, he could be in the mix for as many seven medals if he’s included on all the relays.

Dressel isn’t thinking that far ahead. He’s still got two more individual events at the trials, and he’s heavily favored in both.

“You can’t win five, six or seven medals if you don’t qualify for the events,” he said. “I’m focused on qualifying right now.”

A fading star of the American team is still in the mix for Tokyo.

Thirty-six-year-old Ryan Lochte advanced to the final of the 200 individual medley, his only realistic chance to qualify for his fifth Olympics and redeem himself for the embarrassment of Rio, where he lied about being robbed at gunpoint during a boisterous night on the town.

But Lochte has his work cut out for him. Michael Andrew dominated the semifinals with a time of 1:55.26 — fastest in the world this year. Lochte was the sixth-fastest qualifier at 1:58.65, nearly 3 1/2 seconds behind Andrew.

Only the top two will make the Olympic team Friday.

At least Lochte made it to the final.

Manuel’s failure to advance in the 100 free means she won’t be in the mix for the relays, either. She still has a chance to qualify for the team in the 50 free — an event she took silver in at Rio as part of a four-medal haul.

Overcome by emotions, Manuel said she arrived in Omaha knowing it would be a struggle just to make the team because of health and emotional issues. She conceded that the racial turmoil since George Floyd’s death took a toll on her.

“That’s what’s giving me peace,” she said. “I know I did everything I possibly could to even be here, and that makes me proud. I continued to stay strong during this process even when there were times when I wanted to give up.”

Natalie Hinds and Olivia Smoliga were the top qualifiers in 53.55. Allison Schmitt, who already made the team in the 200 free, advanced to the final with the sixth-best time (54.08).

In the men’s 200 breaststroke, Nic Fink made the Olympics for the first time at age 27, winning with a time of 2:07.55 in a 1-2 finish with club teammate Andrew Wilson.

Fink failed to finish in the top two at either the 2012 or 2016 trials, and he had another heartbreak with a third-place showing in the 100 breast this year.

Now, finally, he’s got his long-sought spot on the Olympic team.

“It’s something I can’t really describe,” Fink said. “Relief is only the beginning of what I’m feeling right now. It’s a long journey to come here. I’ve had so much support and help. I’m so grateful for this opportunity and to come back after getting third in the 100.”

Wilson, who swims with Fink on the Athens Bulldog Swim Club in Georgia, earned a likely second individual event at the Tokyo Games with a runner-up finish in 2:08.32. Wilson also finished second in the 100 breast.

“It’s really fun to see it pay off for Andrew and I,” Fink said.

Kevin Cordes, who made the 2016 Olympic team in both breaststroke events, came up short this time. He was a distant fourth, nearly 2 seconds behind Wilson.

Hali Flickinger won the 200 butterfly to expand her program for Tokyo. She already had a runner-up finish in the 400 individual medley.

Flickinger finished seventh in the 200 fly at the Rio Olympics. She’s hoping to contend for a medal after moving to Arizona to swim for Bob Bowman,

“It’s helped tremendously, and my swimming is really showing that,” Flickinger said. “I love the group that I train with every single day, along with Bob. I’m relaly grateful.”

The U.S. team added another first-time Olympian when Bobby Finke of Clearwater, Florida won the men’s 800 freestyle, an event that will make its Olympic debut in Tokyo.

He covered 16 laps in 7:48.22, holding off runner-up Michael Brinegar (7:49.94). Ross Dant just missed an Olympic spot, finishing a mere 72-hundredths behind Brinegar in a thrilling finish.

Olympic gold medalists Ryan Murphy and Lilly King were top qualifiers in their semifinals events.

Murphy led the way in the 200 backstroke at 1:55.60, setting him up for another Olympic event after his win in the 100 back. He was a double gold-medalist in those races at Rio, and the American men haven’t lost a backstroke event since the 1992 Barcelona Games.

Likewise, it was King advancing in the 200 breaststroke at 2:22.73, which she hopes to add to her Olympic schedule after winning the 100 breast.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Runner Shelby Houlihan allowed to race in US trials pending ban appeals

The Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld Houlihan’s four-year ban after she tested positive for trace amounts of the performance enhancer nandrolone.

EUGENE, Ore — Banned runner Shelby Houlihan is in the lineup and will be allowed to run at U.S. Olympic track and field trials while any appeals she files are pending.

Houlihan, the American record holder at 1,500 and 5,000 meters, is on the start list for Friday’s preliminaries at both distances. Though those lists were initially produced before word of her four-year doping ban went public, USA Track and Field said there were no plans to take her off.

“Given there is an active appeal process, USATF will allow any athletes to continue competing until the process is completed,” managing director of communications Susan Hazzard said.

Earlier this week, the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld Houlihan’s four-year ban for testing positive for trace amounts of the performance enhancer nandrolone.

She blamed a positive test on a pork burrito she ate 10 hours before a test in December. Contaminated meats have led to positive tests in other cases, many of which have been dismissed. But Houlihan did not receive any leniency, and her ban would keep her out of the upcoming Olympics and the 2024 Games.

RELATED: Runner failed to prove banned substance came from burrito, sport’s court says

RELATED: American record holder Shelby Houlihan receives 4-year ban a week before Olympic track trials

It still might, but USATF doesn’t want to deny her a chance to qualify if, in fact, she can be reinstated on an appeal.

“You can always resolve the outcome later, but you can’t re-run a race,” CEO Max Siegel said.

Houlihan’s representatives would not say what her next move would be. Typically, when athletes lose cases at CAS, which is based in Switzerland, they appeal to that country’s highest court. In time-sensitive cases, that court can issue an injunction that would allow an athlete to participate while a case is decided.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

2 for 2: Ledecky wins her shortest, longest races at trials

An hour after winning the 200-meter freestyle, Katie Ledecky — as usual — destroyed her competition in the grueling 1,500.

OMAHA, Neb. — Katie Ledecky’s most grueling night at the U.S. Olympic swimming trials resulted in two more victories. She didn’t seem bothered at all to have to swim her shortest and longest events about 70 minutes apart.

The 24-year-old from the nation’s capital won the 200-meter freestyle first. She rushed off to the practice pool to warm down as best she could, then it was back to the arena for the 1,500 free — roughly the equivalent of a mile and a new event for the women at the upcoming Olympics.

It was a totally different race, stressing endurance over speed, but it looked just the same.

Ledecky touched the wall far ahead of everyone else, giving her a third individual race at the pandemic-delayed Tokyo Olympics. Her winning time was 15 minutes, 40.50 seconds, well off her 2018 world record (15:20.48) but fastest in the world this year.

Ledecky has already pondered the significance of the inaugural women’s 1,500 free.

About time, she said.

“The men have had the mile in the Olympics since 1908,” Ledecky pointed out. “It’s 2021, and we finally got one.”

Erica Sullivan was nearly a half-lap behind, but she knocked more than 4 seconds off her personal best to take the expected second Olympic berth in 15:51.18.

The 200 free was one of four gold medals that Ledecky won at the Rio Games. She’ll get a chance to defend that title after winning in 1:55.11, a full body length ahead of the field.

Allison Schmitt, who won the event at the 2012 London Games, is headed to her fourth Olympics at age 31 after holding off Paige Madden by one-hundredth of a second for the runner-up spot behind Ledecky.

Schmitt’s time was 1:56.79, which gives her a likely individual event in Tokyo as well as a spot on the 4×200 free relay. Madden and Katie McLaughlin, who was fourth in 1:57.16, will also be going to the Olympics as relay swimmers.

“I knew it was going to be close,” Schmitt said. “I didn’t know how close it was until I got out of the water and saw one-hundredth on the board.”

As Schmitt crossed the deck, her longtime teammate and good friend Michael Phelps raced down from the stands to give her a long embrace. Both swimmers have disclosed their struggles with depression even while performing brilliantly in the pool.

“I don’t even know how to put it into words,” Schmitt said. “He’s been a brother inside the pool and outside the pool. It helped me so much. Even now, when he’s not swimming, he’s a huge part of it.”

Ledecky already won the 400 free, though she wasn’t as fast as expected. She’s also heavily favored in the 800 free, another race she won at Rio, which means she could swim as many as four individual events and perhaps a couple of relays at the Tokyo games.

“Katie is amazing,” Schmitt said. “As her teammate and her friend, I’m going to be right there along the way cheering her on.”

Zach Harting earned his first trip to the Olympics with a victory in the men’s 200-meter butterfly.

Harting, a 23-year-old from Huntsville, Alabama, won with a time of 1:55.06 after a restless night.

“I couldn’t sleep last night, woke up before my alarm, heart pounding out of my chest, crazy adrenaline,” he said. “I wanted to puke all through warm-up, still kind of want to do that. I don’t think I really handled it well, but I knew I was going to win so that kind of gave me a little bit of peace.”

Harting is already making plans to get the customary Olympic rings tattoo.

“Coming in here and not making the team was not an option,” he said. “I don’t know if I could have handled it, so the easiest thing to do was make the team and that’s what I did.”

Gunnar Bentz, who was among the swimmers involved in Ryan Lochte’s infamous night in Rio five years ago, touched after Harting in 1:55.34 and will get the expected second spot in the event.

Alex Walsh won a thrilling race in the women’s 200 individual medley, with only four-hundredths of a second separating the top three.

The winner touched in 2:09.30, followed by Kate Douglass at 2:09.32 and Madisyn Cox in 2:09.34. Douglass will get the expected second spot on the Olympic team, while Cox endured another heartbreak after finishing fourth in two events at the 2016 trials.

Walsh and Douglass give the American team two more first-time Olympians.

“I’m in shock,” Walsh said.

Eighteen-year-old Torri Huske, who already made the team in the 100 butterfly, got off a blistering start in her signature stroke but couldn’t hold on. She faded to fourth in 2:10.38.

Ledecky is one of at least two swimmers the Americans are counting on to be big stars at these Olympics, the first since 1996 that won’t include Phelps. He retired after Rio with a record 23 gold medals and 28 medals overall.

The other is Caeleb Dressel, who was top qualifier in the semifinals of the 100 free with a time of 47.77.

Nathan Adrian, an eight-time Olympic medalist who won the 100 free at the 2012 Olympics and captured a bronze in Rio, failed to even qualify for the final after finishing sixth in his heat and 13th overall at 48.92.

“Goodness,” Dressel said when asked about Adrian failing to advance. “When we have six guys under 48 (seconds) heading into this (final), there’s real talent here. It’s real deep. It’s great for the sport, but it’s tough to get your hand on the wall first.”

Adrian, who overcame testicular cancer and is now married with an infant daughter, conceded that it was hard to maintain the sort of focus he needed at age 32.

“When I had a bad practice before, it was a little bit of a dagger in the heart. I would be very, very affected by that,” he said. “Now, I just want to go home and immediately give my wife and baby a hug and a kiss.

“In so many indescribable ways, this is such an all-in sport. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to stick two good swims out there.”

The other is Caeleb Dressel, who was top qualifier in the semifinals of the 100 free with a time of 47.77.

Nathan Adrian, an eight-time Olympic medalist who won the 100 free at the 2012 Olympics and captured a bronze in Rio, failed to even qualify for the final after finishing sixth in his heat and 13th overall at 48.92.

His last chance to make it back to another Olympics at age 32 will be in the 50 free.

“Goodness,” Dressel said when asked about Adrian failing to advance. “When we have six guys under 48 (seconds) heading into this (final), there’s real talent here. It’s real deep. It’s great for the sport, but it’s tough to get your hand on the wall first.”

Adrian, who overcame testicular cancer and is now married with an infant daughter, conceded that it was hard to maintain the sort of focus he needed at age 32.

“When I had a bad practice before, it was a little bit of a dagger in the heart. I would be very, very affected by that,” he said. “Now, I just want to go home and immediately give my wife and baby a hug and a kiss.

“In so many indescribable ways, this is such an all-in sport. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to stick two good swims out there.”

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Ryan Lochte fails to advance in first event at US trials, drops out of another

Lochte is hoping to make it to one more Olympics to erase the stigma of an incident at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, where he lied about being robbed at gunpoint.

OMAHA, Neb. — Olympic champion Ryan Lochte failed to advance from the preliminaries of the 200-meter freestyle on Monday, his first event of the U.S. Olympic swimming trials.

The 36-year-old Lochte, attempting to make his fifth Olympic team, posted a time of 1 minute, 49.23 seconds — only good enough for 25th place overall.

The top 16 advanced to the evening semifinals, led by Kieran Smith at 1:46.54. Caeleb Dressel was second in 1:46.63.

Smith won the 400 free on Sunday to earn his first trip to the Olympics.

Lochte was also entered Monday in the 100 backstroke, but he scratched that event. Defending Olympic champion Ryan Murphy easily advanced from the preliminaries, as did 36-year-old Matt Grevers, the 2012 gold medalist.

Even though Lochte initially entered six events at the trials, it appears the 200 individual medley is the only race in which he has any realistic shot of earning a trip to Tokyo. He scratched the 400 IM on Sunday.

Lochte has won 12 Olympic medals, including six golds. Now married with two children, he hopes to make it to one more Olympics to erase the stigma of an incident at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, where he lied about being robbed at gunpoint.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Meet the 'old-timers' going against swimmers half their age at US Olympic trials

While swimming will always be a young person’s sport, there are 13 athletes in the 30-and-older club competing at the U.S. Olympic trials in Omaha, Nebraska.

OMAHA, Neb. — Amanda Weir just can’t bring herself to say the word “retirement.”

So, she’s still at the pool, still toiling away against kids half her age — if that.

“I don’t think I’ll ever officially end it,” said the 35-year-old Weir, who is attempting to make her fifth Olympics at the U.S. swimming trials that began Sunday. “I don’t think I’ll ever be able to stand behind the block and say this is my last race.”

While swimming will always be a young person’s sport, Weir has plenty of company in the 30-and-older club.

She and a dozen other such athletes are competing in Omaha, led by 40-year-old Olympic gold medalist Anthony Ervin.

“Obviously, I have a lot of memories and a lot of history, but it’s great to be back in it,” Ervin said. “My heart wants to be a little bit more competitive.”

Ervin, who shared gold in the 50-meter freestyle at the 2000 Sydney Games and improbably won that event again five years ago in Rio at age 35, is realistic about his chances in Omaha.

He’s seeded 40th in the 50 free — which seems appropriate — and would be more than satisfied simply to make the final. He knows his chances of qualifying for the Olympic team by finishing first or second are beyond remote.

This is essentially his farewell tour.

“God willing, I’ll be in finals and I can shake the hands of those guys who are going (to the Tokyo Games) and pass the torch, so to speak,” Ervin said.

Nathan Adrian has loftier goals at age 32.

Attempting to make his fourth Olympic team, the five-time gold medalist has bested testicular cancer and is seeded in the top 10 in both the 50 and 100 free.

But he also concedes the challenges of being a top-level swimmer while balancing a home life. His wife, Hallie, had their first child in February, a daughter named Parker.

“To be really, really, really fast, 100% top-speed training, you’ve got to be like a cat,” Adrian said. “You’ve got to sleep so much, you’ve got to lay down and watch Netflix all day and then come to the pool kind of walking slow and when you turn it on, you turn it on.

“I’m just not at the point in my life where I can really do that sustainably right now and be the kind of dad I want to be,” he went on. “When I get home, I want to hold Parker until she goes to sleep every time.”

The most prominent of the old-timers is 36-year-old Ryan Lochte, a 12-time Olympic medalist who became a husband and father after the embarrassment of Rio, where he lied about being robbed at gunpoint during a raucous night on the town with several U.S. teammates.

Lochte insists he’s gotten his life in order and is confident of not only making the U.S. team for the fifth time, but winning another medal in Tokyo.

But his times coming into Omaha aren’t too encouraging. His only real chance appears to be the 200 individual medley, where he’s seeded fifth.

If nothing else, he seems to have figured out life away from the pool.

“No matter how many times you get knocked down, it’s how you get up that defines you as a person,” Lochte said. “There’s more to life than being a rock star, having that rock star persona. I had a wake-up call and now I’m the happiest person ever.”

Swimming was once a sport that afforded few chances for making a buck once a college career was over.

After winning a then-record seven gold medals at the 1972 Munich Games, Mark Spitz retired at age 22.

Matt Biondi hung up his swimming trunks before his 27th birthday, frustrated at the lack of assistance from USA Swimming and stymied in his attempts to professionalize the sport.

These days, however, the top swimmers can make a comfortable living into their 30s, which has made it possible for someone such as 36-year-old Matt Grevers to stay in the water far longer than he might’ve anticipated earlier in his career.

Increased support from USA Swimming, more sponsorship opportunities and the new International Swimming League have kept some athletes around into their 30s, like their counterparts in the NBA and Major League Baseball.

That said, Grevers knows it can’t go on forever. He’s already making plans for his post-swimming life, launching a career in residential real estate and pondering the financial viability of investing in swimming schools.

Swimming, he said, is “week by week. I have really good weeks where I get really excited and think, ‘Hey, I could do this forever,’ and then there’s times I just feel so beat down and I’m like, ‘Man, I am 36 and I do feel it.’”

Aging swimmers can also pose challenges for their coaches, who must alter their methods and tactics for the 30-something crowd.

A young swimmer will dutifully follow their coach’s orders. An older swimmer doesn’t look at things that way.

“You have to keep it interesting enough where they enjoy what they’re doing,” said Dave Durden, who coaches Adrian and has worked with Ervin. “When they walk in the door at 18 and they look at the coach-athlete relationship, they look at me as the boss. … As they get older, they’re a co-owner in this.”

Which only makes it that much harder to walk away.

Take Weir, who has competed in three Olympics and trains in Atlanta. Even after having major neck surgery following the 2016 Rio Games, she still has such passion for swimming that she put herself through an arduous rehab, all with an eye toward making it to Tokyo.

The odds are certainly stacked against her. She’s seeded 34th in the 100 free and 49th in the 50 free.

But when she steps up on the blocks, gazes out on that lane in front of her and plunges into the water, it all seems worth it.

“I just love it. I love the training. I love the routine of it,” Weir said. “I don’t think I’ll ever fully retire from it. Even if I’m not competing for anything major, I’ll always be in the water.”

AP Sports Writer Beth Harris contributed to this report.

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Destiny 2 Trials of Osiris rewards this week and Bungie loot report

The Trials of Osiris begin today, with Destiny 2 gamers taking on the latest Crucible challenges to earn the best rewards on offer.

As usual, returning loot will be available to those who can string together a generous amount of wins.

The Legendary Shayura’s Wrath SMG has been a popular choice for Trials during Season 14, and there’s a good chance it will be available again before June ends.

The first matches will be kicking off at 6pm BST on Friday, June 11, 2021. The new rewards curated by Bungie will be available between now and the next Weekly Reset, which is scheduled for June 15.

Saint-14 is the full-time Trials of Osiris vendor who currently resides in the Tower Hangar with his pigeons and ship.

And visiting him will be worth it for those who can smash through the Crucible and score some wins as Saint’s inventory updates with Trials Passages, Bounties, and the option to turn in Trials Tokens.

The map rotations continue each week, although Bungie has made changes to the weapons you can pick up during an event.

Last week saw Bungie offer the Shayura’s Wrath SMG for three-wins, a Class Item for five-wins, seven-wins for the Sword, and Flawless offering an adept Fusion Rifle.

Season 14 has also seen Bungie release a new weapon as part of Trials, meaning something similar could happen again.

Details on other aspects of the Trials experience can be found below, courtesy of Bungie:

Trials Passages: “There are five unique Passages that can be bought from Saint-14 which offer their own mechanics. Each Passage will track wins and losses in a single Trials run. If three losses appear on a Passage, players will be restricted from the activity and have to either reset the Passage or purchase a new one.”

These include:

Mercy: Always available and Forgives one loss per run.

Ferocity: Always available and with zero losses, your Third Win grants a Bonus Win.

Confidence: Unlocks after going Flawless and grants a bonus reward from the Flawless chest.

Wealth: Unlocks at 5 wins and Increases Trials tokens from completing and winning Trials matches.

Wisdom: Unlocks at 7 wins and grants bonus XP from Trials Wins, scaling with the number of Wins on a Ticket.

Trials Bounties: “Along with Passages, players can also purchase three different Trials Bounties which will reward players for completing them: Weekly Bounties will reward XP, Glimmer, 35 Valor Rank Points, and 5 Trials Tokens; Daily Bounties will reward XP, 15 Valor Rank Points, and 2 Trials Tokens; and Additional Bounties will offer XP and 2 Trials Tokens.”

And Trials of Osiris isn’t the only PvP event available to Guardians today and over the weekend.

The Iron Banner is still in progress and will remain playable until Tuesday, June 15, with Bungie telling gamers last week:

“Last Iron Banner, the Riiswalker Shotgun and Archon’s Thunder Machine Gun were introduced through a Seasonal quest. We quickly identified an issue where these new tools of destruction weren’t available through alternate means. If you’ve been holding tokens for future loot, it’s almost time to sell.”

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This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Gaming Feed

Olympic gold medalist, 2 world champs won't compete at US Olympic Gymnastics Trials

The gymnasts who will represent Team USA at the Tokyo Olympic Games will be named at the end of the U.S. Olympic Team Trials.

WASHINGTON — Two-time Olympic medalist Laurie Hernandez and world champions Morgan Hurd and Chellsie Memmel will not be competing at the U.S. Olympic Gymnastic Trials in two weeks. 

After the conclusion of the U.S. Gymnastics Championship on Sunday, 18 women were selected to advance to the team trials to compete for spots at the Tokyo Olympics. 

The list included the top 17 in the all-around standings and Riley McCusker, who finished 27th overall but second in the uneven bars.

Those who weren’t initially selected could petition to compete at the U.S. Olympic Trials. USA Gymnastics said Wednesday that it had reviewed the petitions and determined “no additional names” would be added to the entry list.

Hernandez, who won silver on the balance beam and gold in the team event at the 2016 Rio Olympics, hyperextended her right knee during warmups before the U.S. Gymnastics Championship last weekend. 

While the 20-year-old pushed through her beam routine on Friday, she appeared to be in pain after finishing. She later withdrew from Sunday’s finals altogether. 

She did not petition to be added to the roster for the Trials.  

Hurd, who was the 2017 World all-around champion during the year Simone Biles didn’t participate, only attempted two of the four events on both nights of the U.S. Championships. She had elbow surgery in March and has become an increasingly vocal supporter of social justice initiatives, including speaking at a “Stop Asian Hate” rally in New York earlier this year.  

USA Gymnastics said Wednesday that it reviewed petitions from Hurd, Chellsie Memmel and Riley McCusker to compete at the Olympic Trials. The organization said it approved McCusker’s petition “based on the criteria outlined in the Procedures.”

Memmel, the 2005 world champion and a member of the silver-medal-winning 2008 U.S. Olympic team, was competing this year for the first time in nearly a decade. The 32-year-old finished in 25th place in the all-around standings at last weekend’s championships. 

The U.S. Olympic Gymnastic Team Trials are June. 24-June 27 in St. Louis, Missouri. 

US Olympic Gymnastic Trials entry list

  • Simone Biles, Spring, Texas/World Champions Centre
  • Skye Blakely, Frisco, Texas/WOGA Gymnastics
  • Jade Carey, Phoenix, Ariz./Arizona Sunrays
  • Jordan Chiles, Spring, Texas/World Champions Centre
  • Kayla DiCello, Boyds, Md./Hill’s Gymnastics
  • Amari Drayton, Spring, Texas/World Champions Centre
  • Kara Eaker, Grain Valley, Mo./Great American Gymnastics Express
  • Addison Fatta, Wrightsville, Pa./Prestige Gymnastics
  • Shilese Jones, Westerville, Ohio/Future Gymnastics Academy
  • Emily Lee, Los Gatos, Calif./West Valley Gymnastics School
  • Sunisa Lee, St. Paul, Minn./Midwest Gymnastics Center
  • Emma Malabuyo, Flower Mound, Texas/Texas Dreams
  • Grace McCallum, Isanti, Minn./Twin City Twisters
  • Riley McCusker, Brielle, N.J./Arizona Sunrays
  • Zoe Miller, Spring, Texas, World Champions Centre
  • Ava Siegfeldt, Williamsburg, Va./World Class Gymnastics
  • MyKayla Skinner, Gilbert, Ariz./Desert Lights Gymnastics
  • Leanne Wong, Overland Park, Kan./Great American Gymnastics Express

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

Australian swimmer backs out of Olympic trials, blames 'misogynistic perverts'

“You can no longer exploit young women and girls…and then expect them to represent you so you can earn your annual bonus,” Olympic medalist Madeline Groves said.

WASHINGTON — Australian swimmer Madeline Groves, a two-time Olympic medalist, announced on Wednesday that she will not be competing at the country’s Olympic swimming trials, citing “misogynistic perverts” as the reason for her decision.

In an Instagram post, Groves said she would not be competing in the trials in Adelaide on Saturday, and was “grateful to feel so supported in this decision.”

She took screenshots of her Instagram post and shared them on Twitter, while further explaining her decision.

“Let this be a lesson to all misogynistic perverts in sport and their boot lickers – You can no longer exploit young women and girls, body shame or medically gaslight them and then expect them to represent you so you can earn your annual bonus,” Groves wrote on Twitter. “Time’s UP.”

Groves won silver medals in the 2016 Rio Olympics in the 200 meters Butterfly and the 4×100 meters Medley Relay.

RELATED: Laurie Hernandez, Morgan Hurd won’t compete at Olympic Trials

This isn’t the first time Groves has spoken up about this matter. In November, she shared on social media that she made a complaint a few years ago about a person who made her feel uncomfortable, but despite the complaint the individual was later promoted.

She added, “I think he went through some personal development first hopefully to teach him to not stare at young women in their toga, THEN he got promoted.”

She also tweeted about a time a “well known coach” asked her a creepy comment, but apologized 15 minutes later “possibly because the team psych told him to.”

According to Reuters, Swimming Australia released a statement in Decemeber claiming that Groves “declined to provide further information nor do we have any previous complaints on record from Maddie.”

The statement added: “We consider the welfare, safety and wellbeing of children and young people as paramount, and we have a duty to make inquiries to uphold the standards of our sport.”

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This post originally appeared on CBS8 – Sports

12 athletes from the University of Texas to compete at U.S. Olympic Diving Trials

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Texas will have quite the presence in Indianapolis at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials beginning on Sunday.

Twelve athletes will represent the Forty Acres at the trials. There are both current and former athletes who will compete over the course of the one week trial period.

Noah Duperre, a freshman competing in the men’s 3-meter springboard, Andrew Gawin-Parigini, a junior also competing in the men’s 3-meter springboard and Andrew Harness, a sophomore competing in the men’s 3-meter springboard and 10-meter platform, are the current athletes participating on the men’s side.

On the women’s side, it’ll be Janie Boyle, a sophomore competing in the 10-meter platform, Bridget O’Neil, a freshman competing in the 3-meter springboard, Jordan Skilken, a sophomore competing in the 10-meter platform and incoming freshman Hailey Hernandez, competing in the 3-meter springboard, who will represent Texas.

There are a number of Texas Exes who will compete as well, such as Murphy Bromberg, Grayson Campbell, Alison Gibson, Jordan Windle and Laura Wilkinson.

Everything will begin Sunday morning 10 a.m., and the trials will run through June 13 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Author: Jonathan Thomas
This post originally appeared on KXAN Austin

Destiny 2 Trials of Osiris rewards this week – Bungie Loot report June 2021

UPDATE: Destiny 2 Trials of Osiris will feature the Distant Shore map across PS4, Xbox One and PC until June 8. Bungie has not announced what new loot can be unlocked during this time, but luckily for us, Guardians have delivered the goods.

So far, Guardians are reporting that the three-win reward includes the Shayura’s Wrath SMG, the five-win being a Class Item, seven-win including a Sword, and Flawless offering an adept Fusion Rifle.

TRIALS OF OSIRIS REWARDS LIST:

  • Three Wins: Shayura’s Wrath Void SMG
  • Five Wins: Class Item
  • Seven Wins: Sola’s Scar Solar Sword
  • Flawless: Exile’s Curse Adept Fusion Rifle

ORIGINAL: Trials of Osiris returns to Destiny 2 today, and this time it will be a little different for those taking on the Crucible event. As usual, returning rewards will be available to those who can string together a generous amount of wins.

The first matches will be kicking off at 6pm BST on Friday, June 4, 2021. These rewards will be available between now and June 8 during the next Weekly Reset. This new loot will be unlocked in the coming hours, but some Guardians might find it harder when taking on the 3-vs-3 match.

This week’s Destiny update made some big changes to how Stasis works across several different classes.

The full list of Stasis changes can be found in the patch notes listed at the bottom of this article, with Bungie confirming last week that the Behemoth generally has the highest win rate of any subclass in most 6v6 game modes and is also among the strongest in 3v3 modes.

Meanwhile, the Revenant’s Crucible win rate, kills per minute, and average efficiency is generally within the top six of all subclass trees, but its usage rate is incredibly high.

So it will be worth checking the latest changes before jumping into Trials of Osiris this week.

Saint-14 is the full-time Trials of Osiris vendor, residing in the Tower Hangar with his pigeons and ship.

And visiting him will be worth it for those who can smash through the Crucible and score some wins as Saint’s inventory updates with Trials Passages, Bounties, and the option to turn in Trials Tokens.

The map rotations continue each week, although Bungie has made changes to the weapons you can pick up during an event.

Last week saw Bungie offer Gauntlets as the three-win weapon, and Shayura’s Wrath Adept Submachine Gun as the Flawless reward.

Season 14 has also seen Bungie release a new weapon as part of Trials, meaning something similar could happen in the coming weeks.

The patch notes for this week’s Destiny 2 Stasis changes can be found below and are now live on PS4, Xbox One, PC and next-gen consoles.

DESTINY STASIS CHANGES

Stasis Freeze

  • Reduced duration of all non-Super freezes vs. players to 1.35s.

  • Reduced Special-weapon, Heavy-weapon, and Light-ability bonus damage vs. frozen players from +50% to +5%.

Stasis Slow 

  • No longer reduces weapon accuracy. 

  • No longer suppresses class ability and air moves (e.g., Icarus Dash). 

  • Reduced movement speed penalty while slowed by ~20%.

Whisper of Hedrons Fragment

  • No longer increases weapon damage after freezing. 

  • Now increases weapon stability, weapon aim assist, Mobility, Resilience, and Recovery after freezing. 

Whisper of Rime Fragment

Coldsnap Grenade 

  • Seeker no longer tracks targets after initial target acquisition. 

  • Increased arming duration before seeker spawns from 0.3s to 0.8s. 

  • Reduced detonation radius vs. players from 3m to 1.5m. 

  • Now bounces off walls and detonates on the ground. 

Titan Behemoth 

Shiver Strike 

  • Reduced flight speed and distance. 

  • Reduced knockback vs. players. 

  • Removed slow detonation on player impact. 

Cryoclasm 

Howl of the Storm 

  • Reduced angle of initial freezing/damage cone. 

  • Reduced crystal-creation freezing radius. 

  • Slowed down sequence of crystal formation to allow victims more opportunity to escape. 

  • Now spawns a small crystal on walls if performed into walls. 

Glacial Quake 

Hunter Revenant 

Withering Blade

  • Reduced slow duration vs. players from 2.5s to 1.5s. 

  • Reduced Whisper of Durance slow-duration extension vs. players from 2s to 0.5s. 

  • Reduced damage vs. players from 65 to 45 (after one bounce reduced further to 30). 

  • Reduced projectile speed by 10%. 

  • Reduced tracking after bouncing off a wall. 

Winter’s Shroud 

Touch of Winter 

Warlock Shadebinder

Penumbral Blast 

Iceflare Bolts 

Winter’s Wrath 

Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Gaming Feed