Tag Archives: unprecedented

Camilla could get unprecedented title when Prince Charles becomes king

There have long been reports that Prince Charles plans to mix things up and slim down the monarchy when he becomes king.

And one way he could do this is by giving his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, an unprecedented title when he ascends the throne.

Usually, the wife of a king uses the title of Queen Consort and ever since they went public with their relationship there has been much discussion about the role his second wife will take when the Queen passes away.

But at the time of their marriage in 2005, an official statement said it is “intended that The Duchess will be known as HRH The Princess Consort”.



At the time of their marriage, it was revealed that Camilla would be known as Princess Consort when Charles becomes king

This would make Camilla, who celebrates her 74th birthday today, the first British royal to ever use the title of Princess Consort.

Public opinion of the Duchess was previously not favourable due to her relationship with Charles, and it is thought this is why she will be known as Princess Consort rather than Queen.

However, royal expert Robert Jobson has previously claimed that Camilla will be Queen and believes the word ‘intended’ was used in the original wording of the statement to give the public time to warm to her.

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Camilla celebrates her 74th birthday today
Camilla celebrates her 74th birthday today

In his book Charles at 70: Thoughts, Hopes And Dreams, he writes: “The critical word in this statement, of course, was ‘intended’. What Clarence House was doing was buying time — time for a hostile public to warm to Camilla.

“Prince Charles, however, has always intended her to become his queen consort. According to an inside source, he’d already decided that before their wedding.”

Meanwhile, in 2018, the Prince of Wales website removed statements saying Camilla will be known as Princess Consort.



The Prince of Wales website removed statements in 2018 saying Camilla will be known as Princess Consort - but Clarence House said this would still be the case
The Prince of Wales website removed statements in 2018 saying Camilla will be known as Princess Consort – but Clarence House said this would still be the case

The title was included in the site’s frequently asked questions section and in Camilla’s biography.

However, Clarence House said at the time that the statement about Camilla’s title when the pair married “has not changed”.

It also added that the changes were made to the website because the issue of Camilla being called Queen had not been raised recently.

A Clarence House spokeswoman said: “Our frequently asked questions are updated regularly.

“This is one question [we have] not been asked by the public for some time, which is why it no longer features.”

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This post originally posted here United Kingdom News

Unprecedented heat, hundreds dead and a town destroyed. This is the reality of climate change.

Lytton hit 49.6 degrees Celsius (121.3 degrees Fahrenheit), astounding for the town of just 250 people nestled in the mountains, where June maximum temperatures are usually around 25 degrees. This past week, however, its nights have been hotter than its days usually are, in a region where air conditioning is rare and homes are designed to retain heat.
Smoke rises from a fire at Long Loch and Derrickson Lake in Central Okanagan in Canada on June 30.
Now fires have turned much of Lytton to ash and forced its people, as well as hundreds around them, to flee.
Scientists have warned for decades that climate change will make heat waves more frequent and more intense. That is a reality now playing out in Canada, but also in many other parts of the northern hemisphere that are increasingly becoming uninhabitable.
Roads melted this week in America’s northwest, and residents in New York City were told not to use high-energy appliances, like washers and dryers — and painfully, even their air conditioners — for the sake of the power grid.
In Russia, Moscow reported its highest-ever June temperature of 34.8 degrees on June 23, and Siberian farmers are scrambling to save their crops from dying in an ongoing heat wave. Even in the Arctic Circle, temperatures soared into the 30s. The World Meteorological Organization is seeking to verify the highest-ever temperature north of the Arctic Circle since records there began, after a weather station in Siberia’s Verkhoyansk recorded a 38-degree day on June 20.
Visitors at Humayun's Tomb in New Delhi, India, on a hot day on June 30 amid a heatwave.
In India, tens of millions of people in the northwest were affected by heat waves. The Indian Meteorological Department on Wednesday classified the capital, New Delhi, and cities in its surrounds as experiencing “severe extreme heat,” with temperatures staying consistently in the 40s, more than 7 degrees higher than usual, it said. The heat, along with a late monsoon, is also making life difficult for farmers in areas like the state of Rajasthan.
And in Iraq, authorities announced a public holiday across several provinces for Thursday, including the capital Baghdad, because it was simply too hot to work or study, after temperatures surpassed 50 degrees and its electricity system collapsed.
Experts who spoke with CNN said it was difficult to pinpoint exactly how linked these weather events are, but it’s unlikely a coincidence that heat waves are hitting several parts of the northern hemisphere at the same time.
A man stands by fans spraying mist along a street in Iraq's capital, Baghdad, on June 30.
“The high pressure systems we’re seeing in Canada and the United States, all of these systems are driven by something called the jet stream — a band of very strong winds that sits way above our heads, at about 30,000 feet where the planes fly around,” Liz Bentley, Chief Executive at the UK’s Royal Meteorological Society, told CNN.
Bentley explained the configuration of the jet stream is preventing weather systems from moving efficiently along their normal west-to-east path.
“That jet stream has become wavy, and it’s got stuck in what we call an Omega block, because it’s got the shape of the Greek letter Omega, and when it gets in that, it doesn’t move anywhere, it blocks it,” Bentley said. “So the high pressure that’s been building just gets stuck for days or weeks on end, and these Omegas appear in different parts of the northern hemisphere.”
In the US, the same thing happened in mid-June in the Southwest, breaking records in Mexico and places like Phoenix in Arizona. A couple weeks later, a dome of high pressure built over the Northwest, toppling records in Washington, Oregon and southwest Canada.
“So we’ve seen these unprecedented temperatures — records being broken not just by a few degrees, being absolutely smashed,” Bentley said.

Scientist says this could happen every year by 2100

There is a growing acceptance among some political leaders that climate change is a driving force behind fueling many extreme weather events, particularly for heat waves and storms.
“Climate change is driving the dangerous confluence of extreme heat and prolonged drought,” US President Joe Biden said Wednesday. “We’re seeing wildfires of greater intensity that move with more speed and last well beyond traditional months, traditional months of the fire season.”
Scientists are working on sophisticated tools that can rapidly assess just how much climate change may have contributed to a particular weather event.
“We carried out a quick attribution study to get some fast answers to ‘What is the role of climate change?'” said UK Met Office meteorologist, Nikos Christidis, who has been developing simulations to carry out such analysis.
“We found that without human influence, it would be almost impossible to hit a new record and such a hot June in the region,” he said, referring to an area including those affected in Canada and the US.
Christidis said in the past, without human-caused climate change, extreme heat in the Northwest US or Southwest Canada would have occurred “once every tens of thousands of years.” Presently, it can occur every 15 years or so, Christidis said.
And if greenhouse gas emissions continue? Christidis said as often as every year or two by the turn of the century.
Several countries, including the US, United Kingdom and those in the European Union, recently increased their commitments — some by a long way — but many scientists and activists say they still don’t go far enough to keep global average temperatures within 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. World leaders pledged in the 2015 Paris Agreement to aim for this limit in order to stave off the more most catastrophic impacts of climate change.
Climate groups have also urged Canada to increase its commitments and wean itself off oil and gas.
“This is literally the deadliest weather on record for the US Pacific Northwest and far southwest Canada region. The losses and the despair as a result of the extreme heat and devastating fires in Canada are a reminder of what’s yet come as this climate crisis intensifies,” said Eddy Pérez, Climate Action Network Canada’s manager for international climate diplomacy.
“Canada is experiencing historic climate-induced losses and damages while at the same time not doing its fair share to combat dangerous climate change. As an oil and gas producer, Canada is still considering the expansion of fossil fuels which is directly attributed to the global temperature rise.”

Author: Angela Dewan, CNN
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Wall Street banks ditch $19 billion of stocks in ‘unprecedented’ block trade selloff – media

Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley have reportedly sold $ 19 billion worth of shares in Chinese tech and US media companies. Traders are now wondering what caused the unusually massive move and whether it will continue next week.

Goldman Sachs alone liquidated $ 10.5 billion worth of stocks in block trades on Friday, Bloomberg reported citing the investment bank’s email to clients. The first batch, that included $ 6.6 billion worth of shares of Baidu, Tencent Music Entertainment Group and Vipshop Holdings, was sold before the market opened on Friday. Later that day, the bank reportedly managed the sale of $ 3.9 billion worth of shares in American media conglomerates ViacomCBS and Discovery, as well some other companies, such as Farfetch, iQiyi and GSX Techedu. 
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Another US investment bank involved in the block trades, which are believed to have wiped $ 35 billion off affected firms’ valuations in just one day, was Morgan Stanley. The investment bank offered two batches of shares worth $ 4 billion each on Friday, according to the Financial Times. 

While block trades, when sellers are looking for buyers for large volumes of securities at a price sometimes negotiated privately between the two parties, are a common thing, the scale of Friday’s moves raised eyebrows. 

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“I’ve never seen something of this magnitude in my 25-year career,” portfolio manager at Swiss-based Bellevue Asset Management AG, Michel Keusch, told Bloomberg. 

Senior vice president at Wealthspire Advisors, Oliver Pursche, called the move “highly unusual,” adding that the market participants are now wondering if another wave of block trades could hit the market on Monday and Tuesday, causing wild price swings in the affected stocks.

Another issue is the unclear nature of those trades. Goldman Sachs explained the sales with “forced deleveraging,” the Financial Times wrote citing people with knowledge of the matter. The outlet also said that the move could indicate that a big hedge fund or family office faced some serious problems. 

Meanwhile, CNBC reported the selling pressure in some US media and Chinese stocks was linked to the forced liquidation of positions held by family investment office Archegos Capital Management. The lack of details about the move makes the situation worrisome, Pursche said, as investors don’t know “whether this was the liquidation of just one fund or more than a fund, or whether it was a fund liquidation to begin with and the reason behind it.”

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World facing unprecedented threat of food shortages, UN agency warns

World facing unprecedented threat of food shortages, UN agency warns

Natural disasters, climate change, and grain and livestock diseases are exacerbated by the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on agriculture and food security, says a United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization report.

The study highlighted that agriculture underpins the livelihoods of over 2.5 billion people – most of them in low-income developing countries – and remains a key driver of development. “At no other point in history has agriculture been faced with such an array of familiar and unfamiliar risks, interacting in a hyperconnected world and a precipitously changing landscape,” the report said.

“Agriculture continues to absorb a disproportionate share of the damage and loss wrought by disasters. Their growing frequency and intensity, along with the systemic nature of risk, are upending people’s lives, devastating livelihoods, and jeopardizing our entire food system.” 
Also on rt.com Covid pandemic could push more than a BILLION people worldwide into extreme poverty, UN warns
According to the report, from 2008 to 2018, billions of dollars were lost as a result of declines in crop and livestock production in the aftermath of disasters. Loss over the period amounted to $ 30 billion for sub-Saharan and North Africa, and slightly lower for Latin America and the Caribbean, at $ 29 billion. During the same period, Asia experienced crop and livestock production loss valued at a notable $ 49 billion.

The United Nations warned earlier that more than a billion people could be driven into extreme poverty by 2030, due to the severe long-term impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

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