Tag Archives: Victims

Holding urges victims of discrimination in cricket to respond to inquiry

The Independent Commission for Equity in Cricket has opened a call for evidence in the elite and grassroots game; it hopes to gather experiences of discrimination, highlight examples of good practice and set out recommendations to make the sport more inclusive

Last Updated: 08/11/21 11:43pm




Cricket great Michael Holding urged people to come forward

Former West Indies star Michael Holding has urged individuals to submit any evidence they may have of discrimination within cricket to a wide-ranging inquiry.

The Independent Commission for Equity in Cricket (ICEC) has opened a call for evidence in the elite and grassroots game.

It hopes to gather experiences of discrimination, highlight examples of good practice and set out recommendations to make the sport more inclusive.

An online survey opened on Tuesday with submissions invited until December 21. Written evidence can also be submitted to the Commission, with more information on how to do so to be shared on its website next month.

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The new chair of Yorkshire county cricket club, Lord Kamlesh Patel, apologised to Azeem Rafiq for the club’s handling of his racism case and praised him for speaking out about his experiences at the club
The new chair of Yorkshire county cricket club, Lord Kamlesh Patel, apologised to Azeem Rafiq for the club’s handling of his racism case and praised him for speaking out about his experiences at the club

Equality campaigner Holding said: “This is a game that I love and have dedicated my life to.

“I urge anyone who has experienced racism, sexism, elitism, or any kind of unfair treatment in cricket, anyone who has a story to share about being included, welcomed, or supported to respond to the Commission’s call for evidence.

“Now is your time to be heard, to share your story and be a part of the change the game so desperately needs.”

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Speaking last week, Holding said the ECB should have handed Yorkshire a more severe punishment for their handling of the allegations made by Rafiq
Speaking last week, Holding said the ECB should have handed Yorkshire a more severe punishment for their handling of the allegations made by Rafiq

The ICEC was set up by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in March of this year, and will use the evidence it gathers to inform a report on the level of equity in the sport.

It comes at a time when discrimination in cricket is in the spotlight, with Yorkshire having been heavily criticised over their handling of racism and bullying allegations made by former player Azeem Rafiq.

Cindy Butts, who is chair of the ICEC, told Sky Sports News it is vital they get a wide range of voices and evidence from across cricket.

She said: “Our call to evidence is now live and we’re encouraging as many people as possible to come forward and give their experiences, whether it’s on or off the field, whether they’re a current or former player, a volunteer, anybody who works for the ECB or any other cricketing authority.

“That’s what’s going to allow us to be able to examine cricket and say what the realities are.

“We want to be able to hold up a mirror to cricket and say, ‘this is what you look like, these are the kinds of experiences people are having in cricket’.

“It’s absolutely vital we hear from as many people as possible, that they’re able to give their experiences openly and honestly.

“What I do appreciate is it’s not easy for people to talk about these issues. We know it can be very difficult for people to talk about experiences of discrimination, which is why people can give evidence to us anonymously, with the confidence that it will be confidential if they want it to be.”

Read more here SkySports | News

‘Harder to spot!’ Pensioners issued stark warning as over 55s become victims of scams

PENSIONERS and older people are being warned they could be at risk of falling victim to sophisticated scams. The alarm bells have rung as many retirees have reported being duped by legitimate looking websites, as well as promises of high returns. This type of scam could be putting a person’s retirement in jeopardy.

Read more here Daily Express :: Finance Feed

Queen Letizia ‘just beautiful’ in blue while crying for Covid victims – ‘couldn’t help it’

Queen Letizia joined her husband King Felipe VI as they attended the State tribute to the coronavirus victims this week. For the occasion, the queen chose a stunning blue dress.

Queen Letizia was looking more stylish than ever in the flattering dress, but the fashion choice was also carefully selected for this occasion.

There was indeed a hidden meaning behind the dress.

Butterflies have been a symbol of the pandemic along with rainbows, as they are a symbol of rebirth and new starts.

With her outfit choice, Queen Letizia wanted to give a message of hope to all of those people who are still suffering due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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On this occasion, the Queen opted for classic makeup and a smokey eye.

She decided to keep her jewellery to a minimum, sporting only a pair of discreet earrings.

For the ceremony, Queen Letizia chose to have her hair tied in a messy but stylish bun.

But the most emotional moment came in the middle of the ceremony when the nurse Maria Diaz gave a speech in memory of his father.

“So elegant,” commented another.

Queen Letizia is well known for being a strong woman who rarely shows her emotions in public.

On this occasion, however, and as she was giving her condolences to the families after the ceremony, she couldn’t help but cry.

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: Life and Style
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Santander highlights ‘best way to stop a scammer’ amid surge of scam victims

The picture is very different for savvy seniors, with only four percent considering it rude to hang up on cold callers.

More than two thirds of over 65s (69 percent) said they would be suspicious if the caller suggested lying to their bank about why they want to make a payment, and 69 percent of this age group would hang up immediately.

It’s a stark difference to the 18-24 year old age group, who appear more susceptible to this tactic; just 37 percent said it would make them suspicious, and just over half (54 percent) said they would hang up if they suggested lying to their bank.

In an effort to encourage more people to hang up during a suspicious call, Santander has teamed up with the iconic Chelsea Pensioners, in the hopes of empowering Britons to say, “Push Off, Politely”.

Mr Lowe added: “The best way to stop a scammer is not to let them sweet talk you into doing something you might regret – whether that’s sharing too much information, not being upfront with your bank about the reason for a payment, or transferring money.

“So if you get a suspicious call, follow the advice and hang up immediately.”

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This post originally posted here Daily Express :: Finance Feed

Bay Area firefighters prepare for bike ride to New York City to honor 9/11 victims

SANTA CLARA, Calif. (KGO) — A group of Bay Area firefighters plans to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks with a cross country bike ride ending in New York city.

Because some days in American history are so significant, people can remember exactly where they were, even decades later.

September 11, 2001 is one of those days for retired Santa Clara firefighter Darrell Sales.

“That morning I happen to come into work and we had a group of 17 brand new firefighters that were in the last week of their fire academy,” Sales said. “For the first two or three hours of our training, all of us watched as the events unfolded.”

RELATED: WATCH: Late night newscast after the 9/11 attacks in New York City

They watched nearly 3,000 Americans killed on that day, including 343 firefighters.

To honor the lost lives 20 years later, Sales and a team of retired and current firefighters are preparing to ride across the country on bikes.

40 days, 3,800 miles.

An honor ride from the Bay to Brooklyn.

“Trying to come up with a way to honor the 343 firefighters that gave their life on that day, we thought that this would be a good way to do that,” Sales said. “We’re looking at averaging 100 miles a day, going across the heart of the United States, connecting with fire departments each way and then coming into New York in time for the 9/11 events.”

RELATED: ‘It feels like it was yesterday’: Survivor of 9/11 terrorist attacks shares his harrowing escape from 105th floor of the World Trade Center

The group consists of ten firefighters and military vets ranging in age from 38 to 72.

Sales was part of the team that participated in the first event of its kind in 2011.

The team makes stops at other fire stations throughout the journey and passes by landmarks commemorating events from 9/11.

Sales says he never could’ve anticipated the feelings that came with finishing the journey ten years ago and he can’t wait to do it again.

RELATED: Miles by Molly: San Jose woman running cross country to raise awareness for Challenged Athletes Foundation

“People will ask you, ‘why do you do this? How do you get the energy to do something like this?’,” Sales said. “It really goes along with your thought process for the fire service. You just make that sacrifice, because that’s what you do because you want to give back to your community.”

The ride will begin on August 1 in Santa Clara.

The team is also raising money for the Gary Sinise Foundation and the Santa Clara Firefighters Foundation.

To donate to the cause, visit the Bay to Brooklyn Ride website here.

Copyright © 2021 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Despite inclement weather, search teams are recovering victims more quickly now that the structure itself is no longer a threat

Search teams have been recovering victims more quickly now that a portion of the tower that remained standing was demolished and is no longer a threat to collapse, according to Florida Fire Marshall and Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis.
On Monday, a day after the demolition of the standing portion of Champlain Towers South, the death toll stood at 28. The building partially collapsed on June 24.
By Saturday morning, the toll reached 86 after more victims were recovered from the rubble, Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said during a news conference.
Sixty-two of the 86 victims have been identified and 61 next of kin notified, with 211 people accounted for and 43 others potentially unaccounted for, according to the mayor.
Authorities have been cross referencing names from a list of residents with US Postal Service and driver’s license information, Levine Cava said.
“We can only truly account for a missing person who is deceased once an identification is made,” the mayor said.
Crews at the site paused their work briefly Saturday morning because of lighting, but recovery efforts resumed within an hour, Levine Cava said. The work will continue despite rain that is expected throughout the day.
Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department Chief Alan Cominsky said the timeline for completion of recovery efforts was 14 to 21 days.
Surfside Mayor Charles Burkett said crews removing rubble from the recently demolished section of the building may complete their work “a lot sooner than many expected.”
Burkett described the progress in removing debris as intense, saying “much of the original pile is at ground level or below. “
The city is setting up a fund for downtown businesses affected by recovery efforts, Burkett said.
Patronis said the crews are paying the same attention to the importance of the task.
“One thing I can assure you is the dogs are still on the site. The infrared equipment is still being used. The cameras are still being used. The task forces that are here … are the same level of skills that were here with FEMA task forces,” he said. “They’re all still working. What’s happening right now is no different than five days ago.”
In an interview with CNN, Chief Nichole Notte of the Florida Task Force 2 said there has been an emotional toll for all the workers.
“I feel like I’m physically digging, but I’m also emotionally digging for more strength to continue,” she said.

Focus on the investigation

Meanwhile, officials have turned more of their attention to the investigation and to ensuring other structures in the area are safe.
Experts have already begun their investigation by examining Champlain Towers North, a sister building that is “substantially the same as the building that came down,” Burkett said.
“We have been in there several times now. We have taken out samples. We’ve done the ground-penetrating radar. We’re trying to determine the amount of steel, the thickness of the slabs, so we’re trying to compile all that information and see exactly if there is some indication of weakness,” Burkett told CNN on Friday.
“I talked to the engineer today, and he’s ready to make a determination as soon as he gets results back and let the residents of that building know whether he feels they are safe or not.”
The north towers building was evacuated for safety concerns.
Burkett said he urged other condo board members in the area to inspect their structure.
“We’ve given them a series of boxes to check in order to make sure that their buildings are as safe as they can be, given especially we don’t know why this building fell down,” Burkett said.
Patronis said that he thinks it’s important for investigators to compare North and South Champlain Towers.
“I’ve advised them to pull the minutes of Champlain Towers North board over the last 40 years and compare to the minutes of South and see if both boards have made the same investments over the last 40 years.”

More structural concerns elsewhere

Employees at a local government building have been advised to work from home for safety reasons.
All staff at the Miami-Dade County Courthouse were directed to immediately begin a work-from-home protocol on Friday following safety concerns revealed in an engineer’s report of the building, according to a statement from local officials.
The report found safety issues with various floors and recommended floors 16 and above be closed to staff while repairs are completed, Levine Cava, Circuit Court Chief Judge Nushin G. Sayfie and Clerk of Courts Harvey Ruvin said in a joint statement.
“Following this report, we are taking all necessary precautions and directing all Courthouse staff at 73 W Flagler Street to work from home beginning immediately while the repairs can be completed,” Miami-Dade officials said in the statement. “Over the last year throughout the pandemic all Courthouse staff was already working remotely and only recently returned to the building, and we are moving quickly to re-activate our remote work plan.”
Last week, residents in Crestview Towers in North Miami Beach were also asked to evacuate after a report determined the condo building was structurally and electrically unsafe based on a delinquent recertification report for the almost 50-year-old building, City Manager Arthur H. Sorey III previously said.

How the engineer is examining the building

Allyn Kilsheimer, a structural engineer hired by the town of Surfside to investigate the collapse took CNN on a tour of Champlain Tours North on Friday.
Kilsheimer said his team has been at the north tower for two days, using ground-penetrating radar to check the thickness of the concrete and collecting samples.
Kilsheimer said he has not seen anything that concerns him.
“The thing that I’m looking for is anything that would warn me … to get people out of the building,” he said. “I’ve not seen anything like that at this point in time.”
Other buildings in the area will soon receive letters from the mayor advising them to take the necessary steps to assure residents their buildings are safe, according to a copy of the letter obtained by CNN.
Regardless of the age of the building, the city is recommending the hiring of an engineer to review structural drawings and review basements, as well as a geotechnical engineer to examine the foundation.
“The recommendations are made in an abundance of caution based on the current status of the investigation,” the letter said. “They are intended to serve as an interim methodology to afford residents some peace of mind until the forensic investigation progresses further.”

Tesla Says Autopilot Makes Its Cars Safer. Crash Victims Say It Kills.

A California family that lost a 15-year-old boy when a Tesla hit its pickup truck is suing the company, claiming its Autopilot system was partly responsible.

Benjamin Maldonado and his teenage son were driving back from a soccer tournament on a California freeway in August 2019 when a truck in front of them slowed. Mr. Maldonado flicked his turn signal and moved right. Within seconds, his Ford Explorer pickup was hit by a Tesla Model 3 that was traveling about 60 miles per hour on Autopilot.

A six-second video captured by the Tesla and data it recorded show that neither Autopilot — Tesla’s much-vaunted system that can steer, brake and accelerate a car on its own — nor the driver slowed the vehicle until a fraction of a second before the crash. Fifteen-year-old Jovani, who had been in the front passenger seat and not wearing his seatbelt, was thrown from the Ford and died, according to a police report.

The Moments Before Collision

Video footage and data retrieved from the car involved in the crash show that neither the Tesla driver nor the Autopilot system slowed the vehicle until just before impact.




0.4 seconds before crash

Accelerator pedal pressure before crash

Car speed before crash

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Note: Accelerator pedal pressure measures how much the pedal is being pushed down in percentage terms.

Video and data from Tesla provided by Benjamin Swanson, a lawyer for the Maldonado family.

By The New York Times

The accident, which took place four miles from Tesla’s main car factory, is now the subject of a lawsuit against the company. It is one of a growing number of crashes involving Autopilot that have fueled concerns about the technology’s shortcomings, and could call into question the development of similar systems used by rival carmakers. And as cars take on more tasks previously done by humans, the development of these systems could have major ramifications — not just for the drivers of those cars but for other motorists, pedestrians and cyclists.

Tesla, founded in 2003, and its chief executive, Elon Musk, have been bold in challenging the auto industry, attracting devoted fans and customers and creating a new standard for electric vehicles that other established carmakers are reckoning with. The company is worth more than several large automakers combined.

But the accidents involving Autopilot could threaten Tesla’s standing and force regulators to take action against the company. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has about two dozen active investigations into crashes involving Autopilot.

At least three Tesla drivers have died since 2016 in crashes in which Autopilot was engaged and failed to detect obstacles in the road. In two instances, the system did not brake for tractor-trailers crossing highways. In the third, it failed to recognize a concrete barrier. In June, the federal traffic safety agency released a list showing that at least 10 people have been killed in eight accidents involving Autopilot since 2016. That list does not include the crash that killed Jovani Maldonado.

Tesla’s credibility has taken a hit, and some experts on autonomous driving say that it is hard not to question other claims made by Mr. Musk and the company. He has, for example, said several times that Tesla was close to perfecting Full Self Driving, a technology that would allow cars to drive autonomously in most circumstances — something other auto and technology companies have said is years away.

Mr. Musk and Tesla did not respond to several requests for comment.

Autopilot is not an autonomous driving system. Rather, it is a suite of software, cameras and sensors intended to assist drivers and prevent accidents by taking over many aspects of driving a car — even the changing of lanes. Tesla executives have claimed that handing off these functions to computers will make driving safer because human drivers are prone to mistakes and distractions, and cause most of the roughly 40,000 traffic fatalities that occur each year in the United States.

“Computers don’t check their Instagram” while driving, Tesla’s director of artificial intelligence, Andrej Karpathy, said last month in an online workshop on autonomous driving.

While Autopilot is in control, drivers can relax, but are not supposed to tune out. Instead, they’re supposed to keep their hands on the steering wheel and eyes on the road, ready to take over in case the system becomes confused or fails to recognize objects or dangerous traffic scenario.

But with little to do other than look straight ahead, some drivers seem unable to resist the temptation to let their attention wander while Autopilot is on. Videos have been posted on Twitter and elsewhere showing drivers reading or sleeping while at the wheel of Teslas.

KTVU-TV, via Associated Press

The company has often faulted drivers of its cars, blaming them in some cases for failing to keep their hands on the steering wheel and eyes on the road while using Autopilot.

But the National Transportation Safety Board, which has completed investigations into accidents involving Autopilot, has said the system lacks safeguards to prevent misuse and does not effectively monitor drivers.

Similar systems offered by General Motors, Ford Motor and other automakers use cameras to track a driver’s eyes and issue warnings when they look away from the road. After a few warnings, G.M.’s Super Cruise system shuts down and requires the driver to take control.

Autopilot does not track drivers’ eyes and monitors only if their hands are on the steering wheel. The system sometimes continues operating even if drivers have their hands on the steering wheel for only a few seconds at a time.

“This monitoring system is fundamentally weak because it’s easy to cheat and doesn’t monitor very consistently,” said Raj Rajkumar, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University who focuses on autonomous driving technology.

Consumer Reports said in May that one of its engineers had been able to turn on Autopilot in a Tesla and slip into the back seat while the car kept going. The California Highway Patrol said in May that it had arrested a man who got out of the driver’s seat of his Model 3 while it was moving.

Autopilot can also be used on city roads, where intersections, pedestrians and oncoming traffic make driving more difficult than on highways. G.M.’s Super Cruise works only on divided highways.

Still, Mr. Musk has often defended Autopilot. The company has cited its own statistics to claim that cars driving with the system turned on are involved in fewer accidents per mile than other cars. Last Thursday, he wrote on Twitter, that “accidents on Autopilot are becoming rarer.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has not forced Tesla to change or disable Autopilot, but in June it said it would require all automakers to report accidents involving such systems.

Several lawsuits have been filed against Tesla just this year, including one in April in Florida state court that concerns a 2019 crash in Key Largo. A Tesla Model S with Autopilot on failed to stop at a T intersection and crashed into a Chevrolet Tahoe parked on a shoulder, killing Naibel Leon, 22. Another suit was filed in California in May by Darel Kyle, 55, who suffered serious spinal injuries when a Tesla under Autopilot control rear-ended the van he was driving.

The crash that killed Jovani Maldonado is a rare case when video and data from the Tesla car have become available. The Maldonados’ lawyer, Benjamin Swanson, obtained them from Tesla and shared both with The New York Times.

Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Mr. Maldonado and his wife, Adriana Garcia, filed their suit in Alameda County Superior Court. Their complaint asserts that Autopilot contains defects and failed to react to traffic conditions. The suit also names as defendants the driver of the Tesla, Romeo Lagman Yalung of Newark, Calif., and his wife, Vilma, who owns the car and was in the front passenger seat.

Mr. Yalung and his lawyer did not respond to requests for comment. He and his wife, who were not reported injured in the accident, have not yet addressed the Maldonado family’s complaint in court.

In court filings, Tesla has not yet responded to the allegation that Autopilot malfunctioned or is flawed. In emails to Mr. Swanson’s firm that have been filed as exhibits in court, a Tesla lawyer, Ryan McCarthy, said the driver, not Tesla, bore responsibility.

“The police faulted the Tesla driver — not the car — for his inattention and his driving at an unsafe speed,” Mr. McCarthy wrote. He did not respond to emails seeking comment.

Mr. Maldonado works for PepsiCo, delivering beverages to retailers. The family, which includes two other children, lives in San Lorenzo, about 15 miles north of Fremont.

In written answers to questions, Mr. Maldonado said he and his wife were too devastated to talk in an interview. “We are living day by day,” he said. “There is so much sadness inside. We take family walks and try to do things together like going to church. There is a massive hole in the family.”

Mr. Maldonado described his son as an outgoing high school sophomore who liked to sing and planned to go to college. His dream was to become a professional soccer player and buy his parents a house. “Like any grateful child, he wanted to take care of his parents like they did for him,” Mr. Maldonado said.

The data and video allow a detailed look at how Autopilot operated in the seconds before the crash. Tesla vehicles constantly record short clips from forward-looking cameras. If a crash occurs, the video is automatically saved and uploaded to Tesla’s servers, a company official said in emails included in exhibits filed by Mr. Swanson.

The video saved by the car Mr. Yalung was driving shows it passing vehicles on the right and left. Four seconds before impact, Mr. Maldonado turned on his blinker. It flashed four times while his Explorer was in its original lane. A fifth flash came as his truck was straddling the lanes. In court documents, Mr. Maldonado said he had noticed the Tesla approaching rapidly in his rearview mirror and tried to swerve back.

Tesla, via Benjamin Swanson

In most of the video, the Tesla maintained a speed of 69 miles per hour, but just before impact it briefly increased to 70 m.p.h. then slowed in the final second, according to data from the car.

Mr. Rajkumar of Carnegie Mellon, who reviewed the video and data at the request of The Times, said Autopilot might have failed to brake for the Explorer because the Tesla’s cameras were facing the sun or were confused by the truck ahead of the Explorer. The Tesla was also equipped with a radar sensor, but it appears not to have helped.

“A radar would have detected the pickup truck, and it would have prevented the collision,” Mr. Rajkumar said in an email. “So the radar outputs were likely not being used.”

Mr. Maldonado’s truck rolled over and slammed into a barrier, the police report said. It had a shattered windshield and a crumpled roof, and the rear axle had come loose. The Tesla had a crumpled roof, its front end was mangled, its bumper was partly detached, and its windshield was cracked.

Jovani Maldonado was found lying face down on the shoulder of Interstate 880, his blood pooling.

Author: Neal E. Boudette
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