Home Lifestyle The end of speeding? Cars could be fitted with speed limit tech...

The end of speeding? Cars could be fitted with speed limit tech to stop you driving fast

Speeding fines could be dodged forever under new technology which will stop a car from exceeding the set road limit, according to EU law. Speed limiters are set to become mandatory for all vehicles sold in Europe after 2022 in a desperate attempt to boost road safety.

The Department for Transport has previously said the UK would follow the legislation despite leaving the EU.

The new Intelligent Seed Assist must be fitted into all new cars sold across the continent by 2022 after the move was supported last year by the European Commission.

The European Transport Safety Council said the new system would reduce crashes by 30 percent and could save 25,000 lives over 15 years.

The revolutionary technology would use sign recognition cameras and GPS data to learn current speed rules and slow the car down if it was travelling too quickly.

READ MORE: Speed camera warning: Thousands at risk of fines from with these rules

Cars will use cameras to detect speed limits (Image: Getty)

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The car will then be limited to the set speed (Image: Getty)

Brakes are not applied for strategy reasons but engine power will be limited to prevent acceleration over a certain point.

The system will incur an on/off switch when it is first introduced so drovers do not feel limited by the new technology.  

However, in time this is expected to be removed in a bid to create a safer road environment for all motorists.

If motorists continue to speed the technology will sound an alarm or dashboard warning until a driver has slowed back down.

Extra safety features which could soon be featured include data loggers, emergency braking systems, lane assist, reversing cameras and driver fatigue detection.

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Some of this is already in use across the motor industries very latest models and this is only expected to grow.

The Department for Transport is supporting its introduction with a spokesman saying the scheme would deliver a step-change in road strategy across Europe and the UK.

The Association of British Insurers has previously suggested overall premiums could be reduced due to the new braking system.

Cheaper insurance would help dozens of motorists and is likely to make the technology seen as a positive thing among road users who could reap massive benefits.

In a statement, they said: Motor insurers support measures aimed at improving road safety.

“Any steps that can be shown to make our roads safer, reducing road crashes and insurance claims, can be reflected in the cost of motor insurance.”

However, some campaigners have been critical about the introduction of the scheme with concerns it could create an extra safety risk.

AA President Edmund King said the group supported new technology but attacked the idea of an automatic speed system, warning it could make the roads more dangerous.

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He said: “When it comes to Intelligent Speed Assistance the case is not so clear.

The best speed limiter is the driver’s right foot and the driver should use it to do the right speed in the right situation.

 The right speed is often below the speed limit, for example, outside a school with children around, but with ISA there may be a temptation to go at the top speed allowed which may not be appropriate.

“Sometimes a little speed also helps to keep safe on the road, for example, overtaking a tractor on a country road or joining a motorway.

In his warning against the technology, he added that dodgem cars were fitted with speed limiters but still seemed to crash.

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