Tag Archives: Japanese

Japanese capsule hotel opens in East Sussex for guests seeking alternative budget stay

Japanese capsule hotel opens in East Sussex

Pod Central, is based in St. Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex. The venue has 16 pods to sleep in, each stacked in pairs and measuring up to 1.3m x 2.2m. Guests will receive complimentary wifi along with bedding, storage lockers, towels and USB port, plugs, reading lights, ear plugs and fans.

Eco-friendly toiletries will also be available to use on site and ther is also shared showers, toilets and hair-dryers.

Pod Central’s managing director Mia Preston has lived in the seaside town for more than 15 years. She said: “This is something new for the area, offering budget accommodation for young people, single parents, retired people – anyone looking for ‘no frills’ accommodation in a central location, whether for work, study or tourism.

“I came up with this fun idea when I was taking my son to explore universities around the country and it was difficult to find inexpensive accommodation.”

Mia Having worked in property renovation and management for several years. Mia ran a clinical aromatherapy business helping clients to unwind and destress.

Pod hotels were first made famous in Japan more than 40 years ago offering cheap, basic overnight accommodation for guests that are commonly made from wood, metal, plastic or fibreglass.

Pod Central opened for business on June 21 and complies with the UK government guidelines regarding the coronavirus pandemic.

Popular tourist attractions for visitors to check out include the historic towns of Hastings and Battle and Eastbourne just a 30 minute train journey away.

The hotel’s mission is to provide a money-saving alternative business and stay thanks to their low energy and underfloor heating.

Other eco-friendly measures include motion sensors and LED lighting and recycling bins.

Plans are currently under way for 20 more Pod Central sites to open in the next five years in major cities such as Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester and Plymouth and, all located near train stations.

READ MORE: Hand luggage: ‘Save space’ and money with ‘invaluable miniatures’

How to kill Japanese knotweed – the 4 key things you MUST know

How to kill Japanese knotweed - the 4 key things you MUST know

2. DIY methods

While you may save money on not hiring a professional, in the long run an insurance backed guarantee may be more valuable when it comes to selling your home or if a neighbour is threatening litigation.

The RHS says the best weedkiller for Japanese knotweed is “a glyphosate-based weedkiller such as Roundup Tree Stump Weedkiller.”

The gardening experts explain: “This has label recommendation for controlling Japanese knotweed, instructing it to be applied to the cut canes or a foliar spray. SBM Job done Tough Weedkiller (soluble sachet only) and Roundup Ultra also have label control for this weed”.

There are alternatives to this which are also tough formulations of glyphosate – like SBM Job done Tough Tree Stump Killer (soluble sachet only), Doff Weedout Extra Tough Weedkiller or Westland Resolva Pro Xtra Tough Concentrate.

Author: Georgina Laud
Read more here >>> Daily Express :: Life and Style
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New book lends artistry to trauma of Japanese internment

New book lends artistry to trauma of Japanese internment

Were someone to create the ballet of the Japanese internment during WWII, it wouldn’t be any more meaningful than “Balancing Cultures,” the book created by Japanese American artist and photographer Jerry Takigawa, to convey his family’s experiences and confront the racism perpetuated by the confinement. While there is nothing beautiful about the American concentration camps, giving artistry to such a project invites viewers into the story and keeps them from turning away from the truth.

Jerry Takigawa should have been born on the West Coast. Instead, he was born in Chicago, where his parents moved following their release from internment in Arkansas. In 1950, when he was 5 years old, his parents returned with him to Monterey.

Although he was never interned, although his parents never discussed their experiences with him, although he did not discover the photographs that chronicled his parents’ years in Arkansas until he was grown, Takigawa was raised by people who had endured the indignity.

He learned something of the camps in school and through other sources as he grew older, but he had never associated the stories with the look in his mother’s eyes. Takigawa’s growing-up years were influenced and affected by something he hadn’t experienced. There is sentiment in silence.

Jerry Takigawa

Once he studied the photographs his mother had stored, he understood she needed no symbol or reminder to keep her memories present. Not all scars are visible. He also began to understand aspects of himself — why he is so driven to make a difference where change is warranted, to speak up for those that can’t stick up for themselves, to heal injustice with equity, keep plastics and other “false food” out of the mouths of sea life, and become a photographer who makes pictures of how people feel.

“My whole family was in prison for two years because of racism, hysteria, and economic opportunity,” Takigawa said. “This kind of emotional trauma doesn’t go away, doesn’t have a statute of limitations, and doesn’t have to be voiced to exist.”

Silence can serve as a stealth transmission of trauma. Not talking about it, he says, eventually transfers the effects of the very thing we’re trying to conceal.

Takigawa ultimately used his parents’ photographs to embark on an investigation that would become “Balancing Cultures,” part of an award-winning artistic installation unveiled in January, through which he explored the uneasy space between an idea or experience and its
understanding. This summer, he released the project as a 96-page book, using collaged photographs, artifacts, documents, and text, to explore his family’s journey from immigration to incarceration to reintegration and, ultimately, to some degree of reassimilation.

“As I got further into the project,” he said, “I began to develop an expressive vocabulary by making pictures that mean something to me, gradually building the strength and stamina that would enable me to say something personal about the ‘elephant in the room.’”

Throughout his process, Takigawa sought to find out more about what happened to his family to help him understand more about himself while recognizing that his statement piece about racial subjugation dovetailed with ongoing national politics.

“I started the project in 2016,” he said, “during a revival of racist talk and encouragement for people to hate each other. I didn’t plan that; I had been working up the courage to do something that was very much a part of the bigger panorama.”

Positive feedback gave him confidence that he should pursue his project if only to learn and to teach about what had happened during WWII and its lasting impact on society and sentiment.

“Jerry tells a story that’s really important and visceral and, in some cases, political,” said Helaine Glick, who curated his exhibition at the Center for Photographic Art in January. “But he doesn’t hit us over the head with it. Instead, he presents it in such an aesthetically beautiful way, it gets
in subliminally, while we appreciate his images.”

When Takigawa invited his high school friend and college roommate, author and poet John Hamamura, to write the foreword to his book, his friend wasn’t sure he had the time or the perspective to do so. In the end, he found he had both, recognizing he “did not choose these
stories but was born into them,” as he developed his piece into a long-form poem.

“Jerry Takigawa and I,” he wrote, “are Japanese-American, now more often written without the hyphen as Japanese American. Even before we learned to read and write, we felt like we stood balanced on that wire-thin hyphen. Minus a hyphen, we became the bridge, with a foot on each
side, more or less weight on one or the other, depending on the situation.”

Hamamura’s poetry precedes Takigawa’s photographs yet introduces its own images, as he used his own artistry to interpret what Takigawa’s photographs represent.

“So much of our family histories were lost,” he wrote, “because our families could not bear the pain of telling the stories. Our mothers, lovely and gentle, deeply sensitive women, were barely out of their teens when they were sent to the camps. The war shattered their spirits like grenades
thrown against their hearts. . .”

As Takigawa considers the book that has given both imagery and verse to his family’s experience and legacy, he appreciates that the whole collection of his parents’ pictures is now in one place, paired with his prose and Hamamura’s poetry.

“The book is not an end in itself. It is a conversation,” he said, “which, I hope, will continue during upcoming exhibitions, as the book and ‘Balancing Cultures’ installation remain on tour during the next five years.”

“Balancing Cultures” is available at BookWorks in Pacific Grove and Carl Cherry Center for the Arts, Center for Photographic Art, The Weston Gallery, Pilgrim’s Way, and Riverhouse Books in Carmel.

Monterey’s Jerry Takigawa believes his book has given both imagery and verse to his family’s experience and he appreciates that the whole collection of his parents’ pictures is now in one place, paired with his prose and John Hamamura’s poetry. (Courtesy of Jerry Takigawa).

Author: Lisa Crawford Watson
Read more here >>> The European Times News

The Beatles: Paul McCartney was arrested and went to Japanese prison after drug charge

Queen is ‘very down to earth’ says Sir Paul McCartney

Ten years after The Beatles had split up in 1970, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr had all gone their own ways. Each member of the band had begun working on some solo music, or worked with new musical groups. McCartney created a band with his wife, Linda McCartney, called Paul McCartney and Wings. They started performing in 1971, but nine years into their journey, a Japanese tour brought them to their knees.

SCROLL DOWN TO WATCH PAUL MCCARTNEY TALK ABOUT GETTING ARRESTED

On January 16, 1980 McCartney and his entourage landed in Tokyo, Japan, to continue their ongoing tour of Asia.

As soon as he reached customs, McCartney was arrested by the Tokyo police for possessing nearly half a pound of marijuana.

The criminal justice system is very harsh on drug offences in Japan, so McCartney was looking at a staggering seven-year sentence in prison.

Despite the enormous amount of cannabis in his suitcase, the rock star assured the authorities it was intended for personal use, and not distribution.

READ MORE: The Beatles Get Back release date shifts and is now six hour series

The Beatles paul mccartney arrested

The Beatles: Paul McCartney was arrested for possessing drugs (Image: GETTY)

The amount of weed McCartney had in his suitcase was enough that it would warrant a smuggling charge.

As soon as he got out of customs, the former member of the Fab Four was placed in a Tokyo jail.

He remained in prison for nine days before he was eventually released, avoiding any real punishment.

After being released from prison, McCartney was deported from Japan and did not return for a decade.

SCROLL DOWN TO WATCH PAUL MCCARTNEY GET ARRESTED

The Beatles paul mccartney arrested drugs

The Beatles: The drugs seized in Paul McCartney’s suitcase (Image: GETTY)

What do you think? Should Paul McCartney have suffered the full seven-years imprisonment? Join the debate in the comments section here

McCartney went back to Japan in 1990 on The Paul McCartney World Tour.

All the money he earned from the tour in the country he donated to charity.

In 2004 McCartney commented on his arrest. He said: “We were about to fly to Japan and I knew I wouldn’t be able to get anything to smoke over there … This stuff was too good to flush down the toilet, so I thought I’d take it with me.”

Speaking about the moment he got caught, he added: “When the fellow pulled it out of the suitcase, he looked more embarrassed than me.”

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The Beatles paul mccartney arrested

The Beatles: Paul was ushered away and put in prison for nine days (Image: GETTY)

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McCartney went on: “I think he just wanted to put it back in and forget the whole thing, you know, but there it was.”

Speaking in 2018 to James Corden, the star recalled the situation once again.

He said: “I still am hazy as to how that happened but it did. I had some marijuana in my suitcase and I ended up in jail [for] nine days. Scary!”

Speaking once again about getting caught, the star continued: “The guy goes: ‘Oh! [makes incoherent sound]’ I said: ‘Well, what did he say?’ He says: ‘Seven years hard labour.’ And actually, that was the sentence for what I’d done.”

Despite spending over a week in prison, McCartney was quite jovial about the whole situation.

He said: “By the end, I was like: ‘Come on! In for a penny. I’m going in with the boys.’

“So we all went in there and it was fun, y’know, being in the tub with all these Japanese guys.”

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Author:
This post originally appeared on Daily Express :: Entertainment Feed

Japanese Charts: Game Builder Garage Beats Final Fantasy VII And Ratchet & Clank To Number One

Game builder Garage

Famitsu’s Japanese chart figures are now in for the week ending 13th June, revealing that Game Builder Garage has gone straight in at number one in its debut week.

The game – which was treated to a physical edition in both Japan and North America, don’t forget – managed to sell an estimated 71,241 copies at retail to keep Square Enix’s updated Final Fantasy VII Remake Intergrade release off top spot. It leads a top ten with a healthy number of new entries, mostly for PlayStation systems.

On the Nintendo front, Miitopia remains Switch’s second-best effort at present, with Ring Fit Adventure also maintaining its incredibly strong performance.

Here are the top ten (first numbers are this week’s estimated sales, followed by total sales):


  1. [NSW] Game Builder Garage (Nintendo, 06/11/21) – 71,241 (New)
  2. [PS5] Final Fantasy VII Remake Intergrade (Square Enix, 06/10/21) – 20,889 (New)
  3. [PS5] Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart (06/11/21) – 14,663 (New)
  4. [NSW] Miitopia (Nintendo, 05/21/21) – 14,579 (147,402)
  5. [NSW] Ring Fit Adventure (Nintendo, 10/18/19) – 13,507 (2,627,908)
  6. [PS4] Ninja Gaiden: Master Collection (Koei Tecmo, 06/10/21) – 12,210 (New)
  7. [NSW] Monster Hunter Rise (Capcom, 03/26/21) – 11,951 (2,257,335)
  8. [PS4] Guilty Gear: Strive (Arc System Works, 06/11/21) – 11,722 (New)
  9. [NSW] Minecraft (Microsoft, 06/21/18) – 11,661 (1,995,228)
  10. [NSW] Momotaro Dentetsu: Showa, Heisei, Reiwa mo Teiban! (Konami, 11/19/20) – 9,802 (2,223,507)

In the hardware charts, Switch is still leading the way. Here are this week’s figures, followed by lifetime sales in brackets:

  1. Switch – 61,766 (16,304,390)
  2. Switch Lite – 16,551 (3,889,413)
  3. PlayStation 5 – 15,648 (684,515)
  4. PlayStation 5 Digital Edition – 3,771 (135,284)
  5. Xbox Series X – 2,182 (36,185)
  6. PlayStation 4 – 1,185 (7,792,135)
  7. Xbox Series S – 512 (12,642)
  8. New 2DS LL (including 2DS) – 395 (1,165,619)

< Last week’s charts (actually two weeks ago)

Any surprises this week? Let us know in the comments.

Author:
This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Japanese sumo wrestler dies at 28, one month after hitting head during contest

Author: RT
This post originally appeared on RT Sport News

Japanese sumo wrestler dies at 28, one month after hitting head during contest

Japanese lower-tier sumo wrestler Hibikiryu has tragically passed away aged 28, one month after injuring his head during the sport’s last grand tournament.

The athlete, whose real name was Mitsuki Amano, died of acute respiratory failure at a Tokyo hospital despite showing signs of recovery.

The wrestler was injured in a loss on March 26, when he collapsed in the ring, landing on his head and sustaining a concussion.

According to local reports, he was left lying on the floor for several minutes before being given medical assistance and taken away on a stretcher.

He was brought to a local hospital where he was treated for a spinal injury, but on Wednesday his condition seriously deteriorated.

The Japan Sumo Association confirmed the athlete’s death on Thursday, triggering outrage from fans who lambasted the body for poorly training wrestlers with ring-related injuries and for being slow to provide athletes with medical help during competitions.

All members of the association express their deepest condolences. He fought hard like a true rikishi with the help of his family and doctors. Now I would like him to rest in peace,” the sumo association’s chairman, Hakkaku, said in a statement.

Hibikiryu is the first active wrestler to die since last May, when another athlete, Shobushi, died of multiple organ failure after contracting Covid-19.

Also on rt.com ‘How was he not disqualified?’: Fury as Japanese MMA giant continues to rain down blows on stricken rival (VIDEO)

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Japanese Charts: Monster Hunter Rise Loses Out On Top Spot For The First Time Since Launch

Author:
This post originally appeared on Nintendo Life | Latest News

Monster Hunter Rise

Famitsu’s Japanese chart figures are now in for the week ending 25th April, revealing that Monster Hunter Rise has fallen from first place for the first time since its launch last month.

Rise’s sales are understandably continuing to drop slightly week-on-week, with this week’s 86,258 estimated physical sales leaving it just shy of two million in total. Those 86,000 sales weren’t enough to match PS4 newcomer NieR Replicant ver.1.22474487139…, which debuted with a strong 108,838 physical sales.

Elsewhere, the new Atelier Mysterious Trilogy DX Premium Box also debuted in the top ten on Switch with 6,022 copies sold, and the usual Nintendo first-party suspects can be found making up the rest of the chart.

Here are the top ten (first numbers are this week’s estimated sales, followed by total sales):


  1. [PS4] NieR Replicant ver.1.22474487139… (Square Enix, 04/22/21) – 108,838 (New)
  2. [NSW] Monster Hunter Rise (Capcom, 03/26/21) – 86,258 (1,970,371)
  3. [NSW] Super Mario 3D World + Bowser’s Fury (Nintendo, 02/12/21) – 16,020 (674,662)
  4. [NSW] Momotaro Dentetsu: Showa, Heisei, Reiwa mo Teiban! (Konami, 11/19/20) – 12,415 (2,125,061)
  5. [NSW] Ring Fit Adventure (Nintendo, 10/18/19) – 12,287 (2,522,709)
  6. [NSW] Mario Kart 8 Deluxe (Nintendo, 04/28/17) – 10,331 (3,793,952)
  7. [NSW] Minecraft (Microsoft, 06/21/18) – 9,224 (1,910,581)
  8. [NSW] Animal Crossing: New Horizons (Nintendo, 03/20/20) – 8,269 (6,743,432)
  9. [NSW] Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (Nintendo, 12/07/18) – 6,770 (4,249,496)
  10. [NSW] Atelier Mysterious Trilogy DX Premium Box (Koei Tecmo, 04/22/21) – 6,022 (New)

Switch remains on top in the hardware charts, too, with sales of the original model seeing a very decent boost this week. Here are this week’s figures, followed by lifetime sales in brackets:

  1. Switch – 74,433 (1,581,422)
  2. Switch Lite – 31,400 (3,706,151)
  3. PlayStation 5 – 16,838 (550,911)
  4. PlayStation 5 Digital Edition – 3,319 (107,867)
  5. PlayStation 4 – 818 (7,780,555)
  6. New 2DS LL (including 2DS) – 564 (1,162,560)
  7. Xbox Series X – 67 (31,252)
  8. Xbox Series S – 39 (10,138)

< Last week’s charts

Any surprises this week? Let us know in the comments.

Honda to suspend three Japanese plants in May due to chip shortage

Author: Reuters
This post originally appeared on Stock Market News

Honda to suspend three Japanese plants in May due to chip shortage© Reuters. Paris Auto Show

TOKYO (Reuters) – Honda Motor Co will suspend three plants in Japan as many as six days in May due to a chip shortage, a spokesman said on Wednesday.

Honda will suspend two plants in Saitama Prefecture for six days and its Suzuka plant in Mie Prefecture for five days, he said. The output cut was reported earlier by Kyodo.

The suspension is due to a chip shortage caused by various factors, he added. He declined to outline the volume or models of vehicles affected but said that the company will carefully examine the situation for production following June.

Automakers worldwide are struggling due to a shortage of chips, exacerbated by a fire at Renesas Electronic Corp’s chip plant in Japan and a storm in Texas.

X: Therefore doesn`t .

Hideki Matsuyama wins Masters to become first Japanese major champion

Hideki Matsuyama wins Masters to become first Japanese major champion
AUGUSTA, Georgia — Hideki Matsuyama has made history as the first male golfer from Japan to win a major championship.Matsuyama held on after knocking one in the water at the 15th, shooting a 1-over 73 to win the Masters by one stroke.

A five-time winner on the PGA Tour, Matsuyama took control of the tournament with a brilliant 65 on Saturday, doing his best work after a rain delay.
Xander Schauffele closed within two strokes after Matsuyama made bogey at No. 15. But Schauffele put one in the water at the 16th and took the first triple-bogey of his major championship career.

That cleared the way for Matsuyama to claim the green jacket. He made a bogey at No 18 but that was enough to hold off Masters rookie Will Zalatoris, who stamped himself as a future star with a 9-under 279.Matsuyama was one shot better at 278.

Copyright © 2021 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

AP

Japanese Charts: Huge Debut For Monster Hunter Rise Sends Switch Sales Through The Roof

Monster Hunter

Famitsu’s Japanese chart figures are now in for the week ending 28th March, revealing that Monster Hunter Rise has had a – ahem – monstrous launch in Nintendo’s home region.

The game sold a whopping 1,302,132 physical copies in its opening weekend, dominating the charts and leading the pack by a ridiculous margin. Second place went to Super Mario 3D World + Bowser’s Fury, which sold another 37,166 physical copies to put its current lifetime total up to 592,683.

We haven’t seen a launch in Japan like this for any game since Animal Crossing: New Horizons, which sold a staggering 1,880,626 physical copies in its first three days on sale in the country.

Here are the top ten (first numbers are this week’s estimated sales, followed by total sales):


  1. [NSW] Monster Hunter Rise (Capcom, 03/26/21) – 1,302,132 (New)
  2. [NSW] Super Mario 3D World + Bowser’s Fury (Nintendo, 02/12/21) – 37,166 (592,683)
  3. [NSW] The Quintessential Quintuplets ∬: Summer Memories Also Come in Five (Mages., 03/25/21) – 20,374 (New)
  4. [NSW] Momotaro Dentetsu: Showa, Heisei, Reiwa mo Teiban! (Konami, 11/19/20) – 20,179 (2,072,296)
  5. [NSW] Mario Kart 8 Deluxe (Nintendo, 04/28/17) – 13,207 (3,751,594)
  6. [NSW] Ring Fit Adventure (Nintendo, 10/18/19) – 12,632 (2,479,573)
  7. [NSW] Animal Crossing: New Horizons (Nintendo, 03/20/20) – 11,145 (6,710,861)
  8. [NSW] Minecraft (Microsoft, 06/21/18) – 11,096 (1,872,739)
  9. [PS4] The Quintessential Quintuplets ∬: Summer Memories Also Come in Five (Mages., 03/25/21) – 10,378 (New)
  10. [NSW] Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (Nintendo, 12/07/18) – 10,270 (4,218,939)

The Monster Hunter launch had a huge knock-on effect in the hardware chart, too, with sales of both the Switch and Switch Lite rising significantly. The original model saw the biggest boost, which is perhaps to be expected owing to the nature of Rise’s gameplay. Here are this week’s figures, followed by lifetime sales in brackets:

  1. Switch – 190,133 (15,558,365)
  2. Switch Lite – 77,364 (3,526,983)
  3. PlayStation 5 – 51,931 (485,476)
  4. PlayStation 5 Digital Edition – 10,364 (94,735)
  5. PlayStation 4 – 2,174 (7,775,056)
  6. New 2DS LL (including 2DS) – 933 (1,160,124)
  7. Xbox Series S – 847 (9,373)
  8. Xbox Series X – 432 (30,636)
  9. PlayStation 4 Pro – 15 (1,575,723)

< Last week’s charts

Any surprises this week? Let us know in the comments.